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Lesson Plans (19) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Podcasts (6) A program (audio or video) made available in digital format for playback or download over the Internet. Informational Materials (4) Textual information containing useful facts or information.
Interactives/Games (3) A learning object that requires a user's involvement. Learning Activities (2) Any activity that would enhance a lesson or unit in order to help the learner master an objective 
and/or acquire a skill.  Examples include, but are not limited to, online tutorials, experiments, 
demonstrations, and hands-on activities.


ALEX Lesson Plans


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Subject: English Language Arts (4), or Social Studies (3 - 4), or Technology Education (3 - 5)
Title: Alabama's Prehistoric Indians
Description: In this seven-day lesson, students will explore, in depth, the lives of prehistoric Indians who lived in Alabama. Then students, working in cooperative groups, will choose one tribe to focus on as they create a musical parody about the tribe they have chosen.


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Subject: Arts Education (K - 2), or Science (K - 3), or Social Studies (K - 5)
Title: The Medicine Leaf Man
Description: The teacher will briefly discuss Mississippian time period medicine men. The teacher will read Leaf Man by Louis Elhert and discuss leaves of various trees that grow in Russell Cave National Monument and the surrounding North Alabama area that were used for medicinal purposes. Students will then create a medicine man using the discussed medicinal leaves and tree parts. This lesson plan is made possible through the ALEX and the U.S. National Park Service Partnership.


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Subject: English Language Arts (4 - 6), or Social Studies (3 - 5)
Title: Living in the Wild
Description: In this lesson, students will compare and contrast how the Prehistoric Americans lived off the land at Russell Cave and how Sam Gribley from "My Side of the Mountain" lived off the land. This lesson plan is made possible through the ALEX and the U.S. National Park Service Partnership.


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Subject: Arts Education (4), or Social Studies (3), or Technology Education (3 - 5)
Title: Creating a Prehistoric World
Description: In the lesson, students will research, create, and present knowledge gained about Prehistoric and Historic Native Americans in Alabama. This lesson plan is made possible through the ALEX and the U.S. National Park Service Partnership.


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Subject: Social Studies (3 - 8), or Technology Education (3 - 5)
Title: A Prehistoric Connection
Description: This lesson plan is an adaptation of Activity 92 from Project Learning Tree. Students will research the four prehistoric time periods and compare and contrast them with their lives. By doing this, they will recognize the difference between simple subsistence living and modern technology-based living. This lesson plan is made possible through the ALEX and the U.S. National Park Service Partnership.  


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Subject: English Language Arts (4), or Social Studies (3)
Title: A Father's Life at Russell Cave
Description: In this lesson, students will learn about a father's life at Russell Cave and learn about different writing genres. This lesson plan is made possible through the ALEX and the U.S. National Park Service Partnership.


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Subject: Social Studies (3), or Technology Education (3 - 5)
Title: Historic Indian Tribes of Alabama
Description: This lesson will focus on researching, analyzing, and comparing the culture of four Indian tribes from Alabama's history. The rich culture of the Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw, and Choctaw Indian tribes contributed to the rich history of Alabama. Collaborative research in small groups will culminate in presenting knowledge with a variety of visual and oral presentations.


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Subject: English Language Arts (4), or Social Studies (3 - 4), or Technology Education (3 - 5)
Title: Creek War Journals
Description: After a study of the Creek War, students will explore perspectives of families on both sides of the war. Students will compose journal entries from a selected social class of the era to develop and exhibit an understanding and appreciation for lives led by those who lived during the early 1800's.


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Subject: Social Studies (3 - 4), or Technology Education (3 - 5)
Title: A Look at Our Natural Environment
Description: During this lesson students will have the opportunity to research, analyze, and collect data on how the natural environment influenced the Native Americans long ago, and how it still influences us today. Using information gathered from the Internet, each student group will create a multimedia presentation and share it with the class.


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Subject: Social Studies (3 - 5), or Technology Education (3 - 5)
Title: Native Americans
Description: During this lesson, students will recognize that Native Americans were the first inhabitants of our country. They will locate on a map where different tribes lived and compare and contrast different tribes' basic needs and customs.


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Subject: English Language Arts (4), or Social Studies (3 - 5), or Technology Education (3 - 5)
Title: The Native Americans and Their Environment
Description: The students will research Native American groups and relate how the environment affected their lifestyles and cultures. The students will create a slideshow presentation depicting this relationship. The students will compare Native American groups in order to observe the differences in their lifestyles and cultures.


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Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 4), or Social Studies (3), or Technology Education (3 - 5)
Title: Would you fit in with the Cherokees?
Description: By gaining knowledge of other cultures, students will gain respect and appreciation for all people. Students will also become more interested in their own culture by exploring their own beliefs and customs.


Thinkfinity Lesson Plans


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Subject: Social Studies,Language Arts,Science
Title: Constellation Maker     
Description: Make your own constellation commemorating an American woman, like Maria Mitchell. Many cultures have used constellations to remember the stories of heroes, like the Greeks and some American Indians. Included in an OurStory module from Smithsonian's National Museum of American History entitled "Exploring the Sky'' , this activity is designed to help children and adults enjoy exploring history together through the use of children's literature, everyday objects, and hands-on activities.
Thinkfinity Partner: Smithsonian
Grade Span: K,1,2,3,4



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Subject: Arts, Social Studies
Title: Native American Cultures     
Description:
Thinkfinity Partner: ArtsEdge
Grade Span: K,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12



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Subject: Language Arts,Social Studies
Title: Where I Come From     
Description: In this lesson, from EDSITEment, students take research into their heritage a step beyond the construction of a family tree, traveling through cyberspace to find out what's happening in their ancestral homelands today and explore their sense of connection to these places in their past.
Thinkfinity Partner: EDSITEment
Grade Span: 3,4,5



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Subject: Social Studies
Title: What They Left Behind: Early Multi-National Influences in the United States     
Description: The four lessons in this unit, from EDSITEment, are designed to help students make connections between European voyages of discovery, colonial spheres of influence, and various aspects of American culture. They map 18th-century Europe's influence on what is now the U.S., list remnants of European influence that still remain today, and connect marks of European influence with specific explorers.
Thinkfinity Partner: EDSITEment
Grade Span: 3,4,5



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Subject: Social Studies
Title: Traces: Historic Archaeology     
Description: In this unit of five lessons, from EDSITEment, students recover and analyze artifacts from sites in use from the settlement period to the second half of the 19th century. They look for similarities and differences among the artifacts and the lives they reveal. In conclusion, students look at today's eventual artifacts of the future and consider how we may be viewed.
Thinkfinity Partner: EDSITEment
Grade Span: 3,4,5



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Subject: Arts,Social Studies
Title: Celebrate Native American Heritage Month     
Description: This page from EDSITEment features resources relating to Native American Heritage Month, and presents information and activities about the culture and art of the first Americans. Learn more about Native American culture by visiting the EDSITEment lesson plans and EDSITEment-reviewed Web sites referenced on this page.
Thinkfinity Partner: EDSITEment
Grade Span: K,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12



ALEX Podcasts


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Hey Woolly Mammoth
Overview:
This video was created to share information about the Paleo Indians.  In this video, students share information concerning shelter, natural resources used, and how the Paleo first came to North America and later Alabama.


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The Tlingit Indians
Overview:
This is a short song created by fifth grade students about the Tlingit Indians.  The song addresses the tribe's region and the climate in that region, the natural resources used by the tribe, the religion of the tribe, and diet of the the tribe.


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Southeastern Indian Textiles from the Prehistoric Period to Removal
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought continues another year of informative talks on Alabama history at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Join us as Mary Spanos presents Southeastern Indian Textiles from the Prehistoric Period to Removal. The textile history of the Southeast offers a complex and fascinating story that is unique among prehistoric cultures. Eight thousand years ago, Paleo-Indians left impressions of woven materials in clay-floor surfaces in Dust Cave in north Alabama. Southeast Indians in the Archaic era wrapped their dead in cloth before burying them in a bog in Florida. Two thousand years ago Woodland-era Indians, near present-day Fort Payne, covered their pottery with designs made by rolling cord-wrapped sticks in the soft clay or pre-fired pots. Five hundred years ago, Mississippian Indians left behind textile artifacts that included garments, bags, footwear, and images of textiles on pottery and copper ceremonial objects. The arrival of European settlers had a tremendous effect on the textile traditions of the Southeast Indians as cloth and clothing were very popular trade items between the indigenous population and the early settlers. By the 1830s, just prior to their removal from the Southeast, Indians were wearing traditional handmade textile accessories with their newly traded European clothing and were assembling cotton cloth factories to gin, spin, and weave the cotton they had begun to raise. An important textile artifact of that era, Osceola’s Garter, is part of the permanent collection at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Mary Spanos received an M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Alabama. Her research focuses on the prehistoric and early historic textiles of the Southeastern region of North America and includes the technology and traditions of native societies and European settlers. She is currently responsible for the research, design, and production of the prehistoric and early historic costumes for the new archaeology museum under construction on the campus of the University of South Alabama. Prior to her research on prehistoric textiles, she was the associate editor and a frequent contributor to Spin-Off, a national magazine for hand-spinners. ArchiTreats: Food for Thought lecture series is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be prolabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353‐4726.


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The First Alabamians
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought will celebrate the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us for the second presentation in the series at noon on Thursday, February 19 as Craig Sheldon presents The First Alabamians. This presentation will be held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. For the past 12,000 years, the land now known as Alabama has been occupied by a series of Indian cultures. Beginning in the Pliestocene, or Late Ice Age, these groups evolved from small hunting and gathering societies in numerous small tribes to powerful agricultural chiefdoms supporting the mostly highly developed American Indian cultures north of Mexico. Severely devastated by early 16th century Spanish expeditions, Indian cultures reconstructed themselves to become the historic Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Cherokee Indians. This presentation briefly outlines the six major archaeological periods of Alabama prehistory and early history with emphasis upon some of the pivotal cultural innovations such as pottery, architecture, trade, agriculture, and ceremonialism. Born in Fairhope, Alabama, Craig Sheldon was educated at the University of Alabama and the University of Oregon where he received a Ph.D. in Anthropology. His fields of interest include archaeology, ethnohistory and architecture of the southeastern United States and Mesoamerica, and subsistence technology. He has concentrated upon the culture, history, archaeology, and architecture of the historic Creeks of Alabama and Georgia. He has presented over 30 papers and written over 20 articles, reports, and books. He is a member of the Alabama Historical Commission and the Council for Alabama Archaeology. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. View a chronology View a resource list View an annotated bibliography


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The Creek Indians in Alabama
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us for the third presentation in the series as Kathryn Braund presents The Creek Indians in Alabama. Once the newly established state of Alabama extended sovereignty over the tribe, it effectively ended the existence of the Creek Nation in their traditional homeland. In her talk, Dr. Braund will explore the main themes in Creek Indian history, including trade and land, diversity and division, and change and continuity. Drawing on both the written record and historical artifacts, Dr. Braund will explore the complex story of Alabama when it was owned and ruled by the Creek Indians. Dr. Kathryn Braund is Professor of History at Auburn University and has authored or edited four books relating to the southeastern Indians. Her first book, Deerskins and Duffels: The Creek Indian Trade with Anglo-America, 1685–1815, was the first to extensively examine the Creek deerskin trade, especially the impact of commercial hunting on all aspects of Indian society. She has also written on William Bartram, an eighteenth-century botanist whose published account of his southern Travels is an American literary classic, and on James Adair, a deerskin trader whose account of his life among the southeastern Indians was published in London in 1775. Dr. Braund has also published scholarly articles on the southeastern Indians during the American Revolution, Creek gender and work roles, and race relations and slavery among the Indians. She also has contributed to several encyclopedias and reference works. Currently, she is researching the Creek War of 1813-1814. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


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Prehistoric Indians The Archaic Indians in Alabama
Overview:
Information podcast of the Native people in Alabama during the Archaic period.  It features Russell Cave,  which digs have revealed that native peoples used this area as a winter shelter as well as a permanent shelter for years.  It shows artifacts that were uncovered during the digs that were left behind by the native people which give us a glimpse into their lives.


Web Resources


Lesson Plans


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Paleo-Indians in Alabama
http://www.archives....
This concise unit teaches students about the Paleo-Indians of Alabama. A culminating requirement of students is to create a first-person narrative of a Paleo-Indian. Guided note-taking sheets, narrative assignment, rubric, and informal quiz are included.

Informational Materials


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Cherokee Indian Fun Facts
http://www.bigorrin....
This website provides great information about the Cherokee Indian Nation.

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Creek Nation Fun Facts
http://www.bigorrin....
This site provides great information about the Creek Nation.

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Chickasaw Nation Fun Facts
http://www.bigorrin....
This website provides information about the ways of life of the Chickasaw Nation.

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Choctaw Nation Fun Facts
http://www.bigorrin....
This website provides information about the Choctaw Nation.

Thinkfinity Interactive Games


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Subject: Social Studies
Title: Explore Pueblo Pots     
Description: In this hands-on activity, students will learn the meaning of imagery on two Pueblo pots by examining images and reading short excerpts from Native American folklore. They will then design their own pots by creating symbols and will explain the meaning of the symbols. The decorations on Pueblo pots are great examples of how objects can help us learn about the culture and beliefs of people from the past. Originally created to transport and store water, the symbols with which the pots were decorated have become invaluable historical sources.This activity is included in an OurStory module entitled Pueblo Pots. OurStory is a series of modules designed by the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History to help children and adults enjoy exploring history together through the use of objects from the Museum's vast collections, quality children's literature, and engaging hands-on activities. Ideal for afterschool use, OurStory resources allow students to think critically, to be creative, and to achieve academic standards both in and out of the classroom.
Thinkfinity Partner: Smithsonian
Grade Span: K,1,2,3,4



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Subject: Social Studies
Title: Reading When Clay Sings     
Description: In this activity, students will learn how to answer questions by examining objects as well as learn about a book about Native American culture named When Clay Sings . This worksheet can help guide students while visiting a museum, library, website, or any location where objects are used to interpret the past. It is included in an OurStory module entitled Pueblo Pots. OurStory is a series of modules designed to help children and adults enjoy exploring history together through the use of objects from the Museum's vast collections, quality children's literature, and engaging hands-on activities. Ideal for afterschool use, OurStory resources allow students to think critically, to be creative, and to achieve academic standards both in and out of the classroom.
Thinkfinity Partner: Smithsonian
Grade Span: K,1,2,3,4



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Subject: Arts, Social Studies
Title: Joseph Bruchac: The Flute and the Drum     
Description: Author and storyteller Joseph Bruchac explains the origin and significance of the flute and the drum to Native American culture.
Thinkfinity Partner: ArtsEdge
Grade Span: K,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12



Thinkfinity Learning Activities


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Subject: Language Arts,Social Studies
Title: Pueblo Pots: Read "When Clay Sings''      
Description: In this activity, students will learn how to answer questions by examining objects as well as learn about a book about Native American culture named "When Clay Sings'' . This worksheet can help guide students while visiting a museum, library, website, or any location where objects are used to interpret the past. It is included in an "OurStory'' module entitled "Pueblo Pots'' .
Thinkfinity Partner: Smithsonian
Grade Span: K,1,2,3,4



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Subject: Geography,Social Studies
Title: Major Languages of the Americas     
Description: Activity. Students identify major languages spoken in the Americas, map them, and discuss the relationship between the distribution of languages and the colonial history of the countries.
Thinkfinity Partner: National Geographic Education
Grade Span: 3,4,5



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