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This lesson provided by:
Author: Nikki Guilford
System:Covington County
School:Red Level High School
Lesson Plan ID: 10420
Title:

Hershey Kiss Descriptive Essay

Overview/Annotation:

This is a fun lesson to demonstrate the power of words to describe a simple chocolate treat prior to writing a five-paragraph descriptive essay.

Content Standard(s):
ELA(3) 9. Compose narrative texts using an introductory paragraph, specific time frames, clear sequencing of events, and a conclusion.
ELA(3) 10. Apply mechanics in writing, including capitalization of proper nouns and titles of people and appropriate end marks, abbreviations, and commas with dates.
ELA(4) 8. Compose descriptive texts using an introductory paragraph, sensory details, vivid language, and a conclusion.
ELA(4) 10. Apply mechanics in writing, including capitalization of business and friendly letter parts and envelope addresses and use of punctuation, including apostrophe with contractions; underlining or italicizing of book titles; and commas to separate items in a series and in a physical address.
ELA(5) 7. Compose expository texts using an introductory paragraph that includes a main idea; supporting paragraphs with a minimum of three reasons, explanations, or steps in a process; and a conclusion.
ELA(5) 9. Apply mechanics in writing, including capitalization of first word in a direct quotation and use of punctuation, including quotation marks and comma with direct quotations, colon to introduce a list, and commas after introductory words, with a noun of direct address, and in a compound sentence.
ELA(5) 10. Demonstrate knowledge of grammar and usage concepts, including subject-verb agreement with a compound subject; present, past, and future verb tenses; forms of adjectives; forms of nouns; and subject, object, and possessive pronouns.
ELA2013(3) 23. Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.3.2]
ELA2013(3) 24. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.3.3]
ELA2013(3) 37. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. [L.3.1]
ELA2013(3) 38. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.3.2]
ELA2013(4) 23. Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.4.2]
ELA2013(4) 24. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.4.3]
ELA2013(4) 38. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. [L.4.1]
ELA2013(4) 39. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.4.2]
ELA2013(5) 23. Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.5.2]
ELA2013(5) 24. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.5.3]
ELA2013(5) 38. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. [L.5.1]
ELA2013(5) 39. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.5.2]
Local/National Standards:  
Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will create vivid imagery to describe a Hershey's chocolate kiss. As a class, students will list these original examples of figurative language using a modeled graphic organizer. Students will compose a five-paragraph descriptive essay.

Additional Learning Objective(s):  
Approximate Duration of the Lesson: 91 to 120 Minutes
Materials and Equipment:

One Hershey's chocolate kiss per student, an overhead projector or chalkboard, student copies of a four-column graphic organizer (optional)

Technology Resources Needed:

Computer with Internet access for teacher (recommended) and students (optional), word processing software, digital projection device, such as LCD projector or TV scan converter (optional)

Background/Preparation:

Students must have a basic understanding of the descriptive writing process and a working knowledge of figurative language (personification, metaphor, simile). Web sites attached to Activity Steps for any necessary review.

Procedures/Activities:
1.)Place a single Hershey Chocolate Kiss on each student's desk. Tell the students they may not touch the kisses in any way. They may only look at them and know that they will get to eat them later in the lesson.

2.)On a Smartboard, computer with projection device or an overhead projector(or whiteboard) make a hand-drawn chart with four columns or use a transparency of the graphic organizer from Makes Sense Strategies "4MI multidetail." Head each column as follows: Looks like..., smells like..., sounds like..., taste like... Students should not write anything at this point. They are to listen to the teacher and anticipate when they will get to eat their treats. At this point the teacher should engage the students in conversation about how powerful word imagery can be and how much fun it is to create this powerful imagery. Explain that this is the key to descriptive writing. The author is trying to convey an idea or image in such a way that the reader participates in the description by visualizing it completely.
(Graphic Organizers)
Ordering information and free downloads

3.)Begin with the "looks like" column. Have students look at the treat on their desks. Again, emphasize that they may not touch the kisses in any way. Ask students to describe what the kisses look like. The teacher can spark description by saying, "Doesn't the little flag look as if it is waving to you to come get it?" Take this opportunity to review that this is an example of personification used to describe the little flag. Students will begin to develop descriptions of their own when prompted by the teacher. Discourage boring descriptions like "silver paper" by encouraging something more like " silver presents waiting to be unwrapped." Remember that the more creative the teacher becomes, the more creative and excited the students will become. Write down their descriptive phrases under the appropriate heading.
(Kids Konnect)
Figurative language chart for teaching or review, good links

4.)Continue to move through each of the senses listed on the overhead. When the element of "sounds like" is explored, have students remove the wrapper slowly and close to their ears. This way they can hear the foil as it crinkles. Again, they are not allowed to eat the candy yet.

5.)The moment of anticipation is now here; have the students close their eyes and eat the pieces of chocolate. Make sure no one speaks aloud, so as not to disturb someone's thought process. Instruct them to think of a creative way to express how good the chocolate tastes as it melts in their mouths. After a few minutes have the students tell you what they tasted as you write their descriptions in the correct column.

6.)Leave the computer projection, overhead or chalkboard up for students to use as a creative reference. Explain to them that now they will compose a powerful descriptive essay on the simple paradise of a small Hershey's Kiss. Encourage them to recreate all the senses they used during the activity on paper so that other people will understand how great a small piece of chocolate can be when sincerely appreciated. Encourage students to add more examples of imagery to their descriptions as they recreate the experience. (Copies of the same graphic organizer as in Step 2 might be utilized to help students "prime the creative pump" and/or make notes from the class model for their essays. This will also help those who do not finish their papers in a class period.)
(The RSCC Owl: Online Writing Lab)
A brief guide to writing the descriptive essay, sample

7.)Remember to write down students' descriptive ideas under each column. Also this is a wonderful review of simile, metaphor, and personification as they arise in the activity. [I have done this activity every year and it is always so much fun. I get really great writing pieces after exploring the senses with the students.]
(LEO: Literacy Education on Line)
A set of questions to ask before writing the descriptive essay, samples

8.)Assign the essay using the writing process as previously taught and practiced. (Optional: Allow students computer time to type their essays into a word processing program.)

Attachments:**Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download.
Assessment Strategies:

Teacher can review final written essays to determine if student fully expressed word imagery in a descriptive essay. A helpful rubric can be found at this site: http://gnaedu.org/gna/Student%20Services/Classroom%20Pages/Terry%20Van%20Praet/6th%20Grade%20On-Target%20Integrated%20Language%20Arts/Descriptive%20Essay%20Rubric.pdf.

Extension:
 
Remediation:
 
Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior

Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.
Variations Submitted by ALEX Users:
Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

Hosted by Alabama Supercomputer Authority
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
Thinkfinity
Thinkfinity
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