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This lesson provided by:
Author: Tonya Harris
System:Choctaw County
School:Southern Choctaw Elementary School
Lesson Plan ID: 21195
Title:

Congruent and Similar Figures

Overview/Annotation:

This lesson provides a variety of hands-on activities for the students to understand the difference between congruent and similar figures. Students will use geoboards, pattern blocks, and the Internet to explore the difference. The activities can be used to reach all learning types.

Content Standard(s):
AED(5) Visual Arts6. Describe works of art according to the style of various cultures, times, and places.
TC2(3-5) 8. Collect information from a variety of digital sources.
MA2013(3) 24. Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories. [3-G1]
Local/National Standards:  
Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will be able to identify figures as being congruent or similar.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

Students will explain the difference between congruent and similar figures. Students will construct congruent and similar figures.

Approximate Duration of the Lesson: Greater than 120 Minutes
Materials and Equipment:

basketball, tennis ball, two oranges, grid paper, geoboards with rubberbands, pattern blocks, rulers, glue, scissors, lineless paper, scissors, crayons, markers, colored pencils, construction paper

Technology Resources Needed:

Computers with Internet access

Background/Preparation:

The teacher must have the classroom set up for three different math centers. Depending upon class size, it may be necessary to have six centers (two of each). Make sure students know the proper way to use the geoboard.

Procedures/Activities:
1.)1. The teacher will begin by displaying a basketball and a tennis ball. Ask: "How are these two figures alike?" Possible answer: they are the same shape. "How are they different?" Possible answer: they have different sizes. Explain to the students that the basketball and tennis ball are similar. Write the definition for similar on the board and have students copy it. Definition: Similar figures have the same shape but different sizes. 2. Display two-same sized oranges. Ask: "How are these oranges the same?" Possible answer: they are the same shape and size. Explain to the students that the oranges are congruent figures. Write the definition for congruent on the board and have students copy it. Definition: Congruent figures have the same size and same shape. 3. referring back to the two oranges, have students explain why all congruent figures are similar but not all similar figures are congruent. Possible answers: all congruent figures have the same shape, so they are similar. Similar figures are not necessarily the same size, so they may or may not be congruent. 4. Explain the three different centers to the students. *Geoboard Center: Students will make a figure on the geoboard. The students then switch with someone in the group to see if the figure can be duplicated (congruency). Have the students then make a similar figure. Students should use graph paper to draw examples of figures which are congruent to each other. Next, they should draw figures which are similar to each other. *Pattern Block: Students will sort pattern blocks which are congruent to each other and those which are similar to each other. Have one student in the group trace a shape on the lineless paper. Have the other students try to replicate that shape on construction paper. To make sure the shapes are congruent, have the student cut out one of the shapes, place it over the other student's shape to see if they are congruent, and glue it to the previous shape. Have them reverse roles until they have created five sets of congruent shapes. *Carol's Congruent Concentration: Students will use the website http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com (Carol's Congruent Concentration) to further explore congruent and similar figures. After completion of the website activities, have students design a flag that has congruent figures.
(Carol's Congruent Concentration)
Carol's Congruent Concentration is website that allows students to actually see congruent figures. They are asked to math congruent figures.

2.)1. The teacher will begin by displaying a basketball and a tennis ball. Ask: "How are these two figures alike?" Possible answer: they are the same shape. "How are they different?" Possible answer: they have different sizes. Explain to the students that the basketball and tennis ball are similar. Write the definition for similar on the board and have students copy it. Definition: Similar figures have the same shape but different sizes. 2. Display two-same sized oranges. Ask: "How are these oranges the same?" Possible answer: they are the same shape and size. Explain to the students that the oranges are congruent figures. Write the definition for congruent on the board and have students copy it. Definition: Congruent figures have the same size and same shape. 3. referring back to the two oranges, have students explain why all congruent figures are similar but not all similar figures are congruent. Possible answers: all congruent figures have the same shape, so they are similar. Similar figures are not necessarily the same size, so they may or may not be congruent. 4. Explain the three different centers to the students. *Geoboard Center: Students will make a figure on the geoboard. The students then switch with someone in the group to see if the figure can be duplicated (congruency). Have the students then make a similar figure. Students should use graph paper to draw examples of figures which are congruent to each other. Next, they should draw figures which are similar to each other. *Pattern Block: Students will sort pattern blocks which are congruent to each other and those which are similar to each other. Have one student in the group trace a shape on the lineless paper. Have the other students try to replicate that shape on construction paper. To make sure the shapes are congruent, have the student cut out one of the shapes, place it over the other student's shape to see if they are congruent, and glue it to the previous shape. Have them reverse roles until they have created five sets of congruent shapes. *Carol's Congruent Concentration: Students will use the website http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com (Carol's Congruent Concentration) to further explore congruent and similar figures. After completion of the website activities, have students design a flag that has congruent figures.
(Carol's Congruent Concentration)

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Assessment Strategies:

Informal assessment would include observing student interaction throughout the lesson. For a written assessment, teacher draws a picture of two congruent figures. Have students explain whether the figures are similar, congruent, or both.

Extension:

Student groups may be ability paired to allow more advanted students to help classmates.

Remediation:
 
Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior

Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.
Variations Submitted by ALEX Users:
Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

Hosted by Alabama Supercomputer Authority
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
Thinkfinity
Thinkfinity
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