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This lesson provided by:
Author: Yolanda Moore
System:Perry County
School:Uniontown Elementary School
Lesson Plan ID: 24146
Title:

Let’s Get Physical! (or Chemical Weathering)

Overview/Annotation:

This lesson helps students learn the differences between physical and chemical weathering. Students will complete various activities in which they identify and describe the type of weathering that is taking place.
This lesson plan was created as a result of the Girls Engaged in Math and Science, GEMS Project funded by the Malone Family Foundation.

Content Standard(s):
SC(6) 2. Describe factors that cause changes to Earth's surface over time.
ELA(6) 14. Use organizing and paraphrasing in the research process.
ELA(6) 17. Use listening skills for remembering significant details, directions, and sequences.
ELA2013(6) 32. Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study. [SL.6.2]
Local/National Standards:

National Academy of Sciences, National Science Education Standards:
NS.5-8.4: As a result of activities in grades 5-8, all students should develop understanding of the structure of the earth system.
NS.5-8.1: As a result of activities in grades 5-8, all students should develop abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry; understandings about scientific inquiry.

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will:
1. Compare and contrast physical (or mechanical) weathering and chemical weathering.
2. Identify examples of physical (or mechanical) weathering and chemical weathering.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

Students will:
1. Compare and contrast physical (or mechanical) weathering and chemical weathering.
2. Identify examples of physical (or mechanical) weathering and chemical weathering.

Approximate Duration of the Lesson: 91 to 120 Minutes
Materials and Equipment:

Group Materials:
carbonated water
tap water
1-2 baby food jars
4 rock samples
2 pieces of limestone or chalk
permanent marker
2 pennies
2 antacid tablets
steel wool
2 sugar cubes
gravel
5 measuring cups or beakers
10 clear plastic cups
vinegar (white and brown)

Individual Student Materials:
goggles
apron
activity sheets
pencils

Technology Resources Needed:

computer
LCD projector
PowerPoint (see attachment)

Background/Preparation:

Background: This lesson is intended to be used as part of a unit or in conjunction with other lessons on weathering and erosion. It assumes that students have already been introduced to weathering and that they understand that there are two forms of weathering: physical (also referred to as mechanical or chemical). As students complete these activities, they will learn more about what happens during each type of weathering. In physical weathering, rocks are broken down into smaller pieces without changing their chemical makeup – tearing a piece of paper into smaller pieces. An example of physical weathering would be a cracked sidewalk. In chemical weathering, rocks are broken down by chemical actions that change their makeup – burning a piece of paper and having it change into ashes. An example of chemical weathering is rust on outdoor furniture. The activities in this lesson follow the scientific method; therefore, students should be familiar with its steps.

Preparation: Before beginning, the teacher will need to prepare a set of colored index cards (or construction paper cut to card size) to be used for grouping. You will need 4 cards each of 5-6 different colors (depending on the number of students). In the upper left of each card, write a number from 1-4; in the upper right, write a letter from A-D; in the lower left, draw a shape (circle, triangle, square, or rectangle); and in the lower right, write a direction (north, south, east, or west). Vary the way the cards are set up – for example, all of the red cards should not have the same numbers, letters, or shapes, etc. The cards may be laminated for durability.
After passing out the cards, you can then quickly group and/or regroup students by color, number, shape, letter, or direction.

Procedures/Activities:
1.)Show the Let's Get Physical PowerPoint (see attachment). As you view each picture, have students decide whether it's an example of chemical or physical weathering. Discuss what's happening in each picture that makes it chemical or physical. Tell students that they will be completing various activities that demonstrate the properties of chemical and physical weathering.

2.)Give each student a set of activity sheets. Group students using prepared index cards. Allow each group 25-30 minutes at each of the following stations (Each station involves more than one activity):
Station One:
Activity 1 - Effects of Freezing on Water
Activity 2 - Effects of Water on Rocks
Activity 3 - Effects of Water on Steel Wool
Station Two:
Activity 4 - Effects of Acid Rain on Copper
Activity 5 - Effects of Gravel on Sugar Cubes
Station Three:
Activity 6 - Effects of Water on Antacid Tablets
Activity 7 - Effects of Water and Vinegar on Limestone

3.)Regroup students and allow to discuss results with others in their groups. Then have the entire class discuss the activities - Which activities demonstrated chemical weathering? Which showed physical weathering? How do they know?

Attachments:**Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download. LetsGetPhysical.ppt
ActivitySheets.rtf
Assessment Strategies:

Review and/or grade the students’ activity sheets.

Extension:

Have students design and conduct their own experiments (activities) using the new questions from their activity sheets.

Remediation:

Pair students with stronger students and allow them to redo activities that they didn't understand.

Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior

Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.
Variations Submitted by ALEX Users:
Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

Hosted by Alabama Supercomputer Authority
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
Thinkfinity
Thinkfinity
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