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This lesson provided by:
Author: Leigh Evans
System:Jasper City
School:West Jasper Elementary School
Lesson Plan ID: 33032
Title:

Famous Failures

Overview/Annotation:

The students are shown a video of "Famous Failures" which provides examples of famous people who failed many times prior to becoming successful. The students are encouraged to discuss the different people in the video and are asked to think about the famous person's contributions. Was Walt Disney's impact greater than Henry Ford's? The students then (teacher facilitated) list the ten famous people they would put on a “Top 10 list."

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.

Content Standard(s):
CE(K-12) 14. Diligence
CE(K-12) 25. Perseverance
SS2010(7) Civics10. Describe individual and civic responsibilities of citizens of the United States.
SS2010(7) Civics11. Compare changes in social and economic conditions in the United States during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
SS2010(7) Civics12. Describe how the United States can be improved by individual and group participation in civic and community activities.
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution3. Trace the chronology of events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, passage of the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, passage of the Intolerable Acts, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the publication of Common Sense, and the signing of the Declaration of Independence. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution4. Describe the political system of the United States based on the Constitution of the United States. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution5. Explain key cases that helped shape the United States Supreme Court, including Marbury versus Madison, McCullough versus Maryland, and Cherokee Nation versus Georgia. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution6. Describe relations of the United States with Britain and France from 1781 to 1823, including the XYZ Affair, the War of 1812, and the Monroe Doctrine. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution7. Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution9. Explain dynamics of economic nationalism during the Era of Good Feelings, including transportation systems, Henry Clay's American System, slavery and the emergence of the plantation system, and the beginning of industrialism in the Northeast. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution10. Analyze key ideas of Jacksonian Democracy for their impact on political participation, political parties, and constitutional government. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution11. Evaluate the impact of American social and political reform on the emergence of a distinct culture. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution12. Describe the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin and the role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimké, Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution13. Summarize major legislation and court decisions from 1800 to 1861 that led to increasing sectionalism, including the Missouri Compromise of 1820, the Compromise of 1850, the Fugitive Slave Acts, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott decision. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution14. Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution15. Compare congressional and presidential reconstruction plans, including African-American political participation. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present1. Explain the transition of the United States from an agrarian society to an industrial nation prior to World War I. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present2. Evaluate social and political origins, accomplishments, and limitations of Progressivism. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present3. Explain the United States' changing role in the early twentieth century as a world power. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present4. Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present5. Evaluate the impact of social changes and the influence of key figures in the United States from World War I through the 1920s, including Prohibition, the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, the Scopes Trial, limits on immigration, Ku Klux Klan activities, the Red Scare, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Migration, the Jazz Age, Susan B. Anthony, Margaret Sanger, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, W. C. Handy, and Zelda Fitzgerald. (Alabama) [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present6. Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present7. Explain strengths and weaknesses of the New Deal in managing problems of the Great Depression through relief, recovery, and reform programs, including the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), and the Social Security Act. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present8. Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present9. Describe the significance of major battles, events, and consequences of World War II campaigns, including North Africa, Midway, Normandy, Okinawa, the Battle of the Bulge, Iwo Jima, and the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present10. Describe the impact of World War II on the lives of American citizens, including wartime economic measures, population shifts, growth in the middle class, growth of industrialization, advancements in science and technology, increased wealth in the African-American community, racial and ethnic tensions, Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (G. I. Bill of Rights), and desegregation of the military. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present11. Describe the international role of the United States from 1945 through 1960 relative to the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the Berlin Blockade, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present12. Describe major initiatives of the John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson Administrations. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present13. Trace the course of the involvement of the United States in Vietnam from the 1950s to 1975, including the Battle of Dien Bien Phu, the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, the Tet Offensive, destabilization of Laos, secret bombings of Cambodia, and the fall of Saigon. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present14. Trace events of the modern Civil Rights Movement from post-World War II to 1970 that resulted in social and economic changes, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the desegregation of Little Rock Central High School, the March on Washington, Freedom Rides, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March. (Alabama) [A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present15. Describe changing social and cultural conditions in the United States during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. [A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]
SS2010(11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present16. Describe significant foreign and domestic issues of presidential administrations from Richard M. Nixon to the present. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.h., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
SS2010(9-12) Contemporary World Issues and Civic Engagement3. Compare civic responsibilities, individual rights, opportunities, and privileges of citizens of the United States to those of citizens of other nations.
SS2010(10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution16. Explain the transition of the United States from an agrarian society to an industrial nation prior to World War I. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.h., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
Local/National Standards:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

Primary Learning Objective(s):

The students will actively participate in an analysis of these successful people within US history. They will distinguish the importance of the person's impact on society as they debate who should be included on a "Top 10" list. Using the group's top ten, they will then work in small groups to discuss and priortize the list. Students will visually rank the list in order of perceived importance of impact on today's society.

Additional Learning Objective(s):  
Approximate Duration of the Lesson: Time Not Specified
Materials and Equipment:

Computer with Internet access

Digital projector 

Computer or laptop for each group of 4-5 students with Internet access

Intel Tool account (free account)*

*This lesson does not depend exclusively on the Intel tool. It is just that--a tool. This lesson can be used with the reading strategy: “Arguments on a Card”. The goal is to promote conversations among students, encourage productive questioning, and create inquiry.

Technology Resources Needed:

Digital projector, computers, or laptops with Internet access

Youtube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLYECIjmnQs

or

Teacher tube: http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=176603

Background/Preparation:

Teacher should preview video and ensure ability to project to students. Create a free account with Intel. 

http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/education/k12/teachers.html

Access "Visual Ranking Tool" and input the names of each of the famous failures from the video, prior to initiation of lesson. Set up small group teams for your class--recommend 4-5 in each small group team. Provide instructions on the Visual Ranking tool: teams should rank the famous failures in order from greatest impact to least impact on US society.

 • Have all of the “prep” work completed before the lesson. As the Intel tool is new, ensure the usernames and passwords are disseminated. It is recommended to teach log on procedures as a whole group in the computer lab, prior to implementation of this lesson.

Procedures/Activities:

1) Show the Youtube or Teachertube video to the students.

2) Display Essential Question: "Which of these famous people impacted our lives the most because of their refusal to give up?"

3) Engage the class in a discussion regarding who should be included on our class "Top 10" list (in no specific order). The students have to provide explanation and evidence to support why their recommendation should be included. Encourage conversation, dissenting opinions, and appropriate debate.

4) Once the list is agreed upon, the final list should be entered into the Intel tool by the teacher and teams of four assigned to a computer/laptop.

5) Students should be reminded of appropriate small group/teamwork behaviors.

6) Students log in to Intel and follow the Intel tool instructions to rank the famous failures in order from greatest impact to least impact. The tool also gives an area for the students to write a sentence of explanation as to why they ranked them in that spot. Students should use evidence as they formulate their argument/explanation.

7) After each team visually ranks their famous failures, allow time to compare their ranking decisions to the other teams. The tool offers this function along with the rate of similarity. 

8) Come together as a whole group again to evaluate the decisions. Using the digital projector, display the results and lead the discussion. ("Do you agree with the actions of...", "What is your opinion of...", "What information supports this view...")


Attachments:**Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download.
Assessment Strategies:

Assess through observation and student explanations:

After they complete the ranking, make a printable page of the student's list. You will have a record of the degree to which students applied criteria to their rankings, the logic they used in resolving equally strong justifications for a ranking, and even the reflections on their work.

 

Extension:

Students should choose a Famous Failure they most identify with and select an extension:

  • Create a time line of one of the Famous Failure’s lives

  • Relate the person’s character traits to the “Leader In Me” 7 Habits and compare/contrast

  • Research the person and write a brief paragraph, including dominate character traits

  • Compare/contrast with themselves

Remediation:

(In lower grades) If possible, this lesson benefits from an aide or peer helper to assist with computer issues, management, etc.

Students might need assistance logging on to the Intel site or inputting data and information. Pair these students with more computer literate students.

Students who are uncomfortable in whole group situations should be given an opportunity in small group to voice their opinion.

Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior

Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.
Variations Submitted by ALEX Users:
Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

Hosted by Alabama Supercomputer Authority
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
Thinkfinity
Thinkfinity
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