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This lesson provided by:
Author: Katrina Williams
System:Jefferson County
School:Irondale Middle School
Lesson Plan ID: 33119
Title:

Narratives & Grammar:  There's More to the Story

Overview/Annotation:

For this lesson, a mystery, a type of narrative realistic fiction, will be composed.  Since strong adjectives and adverbs will support a mystery, they will incorporated into the writing.  What should a good narrative contain?

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.

Content Standard(s):
ELA2013(6) 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. [RL.6.4]
ELA2013(6) 23. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.6.3]
ELA2013(6) 24. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 21-23 above.) [W.6.4]
ELA2013(6) 25. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three Language standards in Grades K-6.) [W.6.5]
ELA2013(6) 26. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single sitting. [W.6.6]
ELA2013(6) 30. Write routinely over extended time frames, including time for research, reflection, and revision, and shorter time frames such as a single sitting or a day or two for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. [W.6.10]
ELA2013(6) 37. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. [L.6.1]
ELA2013(6) 38. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.6.2]
ELA2013(6) 39. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. [L.6.3]
ELA2013(6) 41. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. [L.6.5]
ELA2013(6) 42. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. [L.6.6]
ELA2013(7) 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama. [RL.7.4]
ELA2013(7) 22. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.7.3]
ELA2013(7) 23. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 20-22 above.) [W.7.4]
ELA2013(7) 24. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-7.) [W.7.5]
ELA2013(7) 25. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources. [W.7.6]
ELA2013(7) 37. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.7.2]
ELA2013(7) 38. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. [L.7.3]
ELA2013(7) 41. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. [L.7.6]
ELA2013(8) 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. [RL.8.4]
ELA2013(8) 24. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-8.) [W.8.5]
ELA2013(8) 25. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as to interact and collaborate with others. [W.8.6]
ELA2013(8) 37. Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.8.2]
ELA2013(8) 38. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. [L.8.3]
ELA2013(8) 41. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. [L.8.6]
Local/National Standards:  
Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will compose a mystery and incorporate adjectives, adverbs, and figurative language.

Additional Learning Objective(s):  
Approximate Duration of the Lesson: Greater than 120 Minutes
Materials and Equipment:

Writing Focus:  Narratives (Mysteries)

Grammar Focus:  Adjectives and Adverbs

 

Materials

Day by Day Instructional Guide (Included)

Revising and Editing Task Sheet (Included)

Pre-Writing Diagram (Included)

A Writing Piece with Dull Adjectives (Included)

Sample Mysteries for Children (Please click the link.) 

 

Things You Will Need to Gather

Designated Area in the Classroom for Conferencing

Pink, Yellow, and Green Highlighters

Narrative Rubric (based on your specifications)

Technology Resources Needed:

Students will need access to a computer lab to type the final drafts of their narratives.

Background/Preparation:

Students should have a basic knowledge of nouns and verbs.

Procedures/Activities:

Day 1 - Effective Technique

Introduce narrative writing to the students.  Explain that they will be composing a mystery, and the grammar skills that they will be incorporating into the writing.  Explain how strong adjectives and adverbs can add depth to narratives.  Go over different techniques that writers use to construct narratives.  Provide two examples of narrative writing.  You will need one that successfully uses adjectives, adverbs, and narrative techniques and one that does not. Allow students to compare and contrast the two writing pieces.  A Venn Diagram is an excellent way to do this!  Don’t get bogged down with labeling yet.  Allow students to use their inquiry and investigation skills to fill out the Venn Diagram.  Consider the Interactive Venn diagram available at http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/venn_diagrams/

 

Day 2:  Relevant Descriptive Details

Introduce/Review adjectives. Tell what they are, how they can be found in sentences, what they modify, etc.  Students should take notes during this part of the lesson.  Provide examples of glowing adjectives, and advise students to stay away from dull ones.  Use a T-Chart, and complete this activity as a class.  Allow students to call out dull and glowing adjectives.  Discuss how dull adjectives affect writing.

Now, put the students in groups of 2 or 3.  Give them the sample writing piece with dull adjectives.  Allow them to make changes to the narrative.  Discuss the changes.  Again, reiterate why good writers incorporate glowing adjectives when they write.

 

Day 3:  Relevant Descriptive Details

Finish yesterday’s lesson if you didn’t have time. 

Introduce/Review adverbs. Tell what they are, how they can be found in sentences, what they modify, etc.  Students should take notes during this part of the lesson.  Explain how adverbs can be misused and overused. Give students a copy of "Kathy's Foul Mood".  See attached.  Go over this sheet with the students.

Give the students a narrative with adverbs and adjectives. I've attached a link that you can use.  See this attachment.

Emphasize how adjectives and adverbs bolster the writing.

Give students a list of narrative topics.  Tell them to choose a topic where they can broadcast their usage of adjectives and adverbs.  Allow them to ponder overnight.  They should come in tomorrow with their chosen topic.

 

Day 4:  Relevant Descriptive Details and Plot Structure

Review adjectives and adverbs.  Students should have a topic today.  Tell them to give their narrative a title.  The title must have an adjective and an adverb.  Ask them to tell you what the adverb is modifying in the title and why they chose that particular combination.

Give the students the rubric for this narrative, so they will know exactly what you will be grading.  Go over the rubric with the students.  Go over plot structure with the students (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution).  Also, discuss the different types of conflict.  I have attached a PowerPoint that you may use.  See the attachments.

 

Day 5:  Pre-Writing

Students should complete the pre-writing diagram today.  See the attachments.

Be sure to explain each step.  They should finish the diagram for homework.

 

Day 6:  The First Draft

Allow students to begin the first draft today.  They should skip lines when writing, and they must successfully incorporate 10 glowing adjectives and 5 adverbs in the first draft.  They should place a circle each adjective and a square around each adverb.  Remind them to follow their pre-writing diagram as it is their guide to writing.  The first draft should be finished tonight for homework.

 

Day 7:  Revising and Editing Day

Give students the revising and editing task sheet.  Students should complete the left side of the task sheet themselves.  The right side of the sheet should be completed by their writing partner.

Allow students to come and see you at the conferencing area when the checklist is finished.  Let them explain to you how each part of the checklist is satisfied.  They should point out their adjectives and adverbs and tell you how they are used in the sentences. 

 

Day 8:  Revising and Editing Day 2

Continue to conference with students as they complete the revising and editing task sheet. When they are finished, give them a reinforcement activity or worksheet on adjectives and adverbs.

 

Day 9:  Final Draft

Students should compose their final drafts today.  This should be done in the computer lab.

 


Attachments:**Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download. KathysFoulMood.docx
NarrativeTaskChecklist.docx
SampleNarrativeParagraphwithDullAdjectives.docx
Narrative(Mystery)Pre-WritingDiagram.pdf.doc
WhatsImportantinaNarrative.ppt
Assessment Strategies:

Students should be assessed according to the teacher's rubric.

Extension:
 
Remediation:

The teacher can pull the students into small groups and review adjectives via visual learning (colors, numbers, etc.)  Teachers should make the connection between the adjectives and the concrete objects. 

Teachers can also review other mysteries with a definitive plot structure and diagram the plot using a plot structure diagram.

Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior

Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.
Variations Submitted by ALEX Users:
Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

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The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
Thinkfinity
Thinkfinity
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