Professional Learning Podcast Treasury Lesson Plans Personal Workspace Site Search ALEXville Learning Assets Home Courses of Study
Home  |    Add Bookmark   |   Print Friendly   |   Rate This Lesson Plan   |   Suggest a Variation

You may save this lesson plan to your hard drive as an html file by selecting "File", then "Save As" from your browser's pull down menu. The file name extension must be .html.

This lesson provided by:
Author: Susanne Harrison
System:Elmore County
School:Stanhope Elmore High School
Lesson Plan ID: 33188
Title:

Understanding Stream of Consciousness in "Bread" by Margaret Atwood

Overview/Annotation:

In this lesson students will explore the impact of narrative technique on a work of stream of consciousness in a modern essay.  By the end of the lesson, students will evaluate how an author uses stream of consciousness and shifts from scene to scene extending the meaning and significance of a motif.

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.

Content Standard(s):
ELA2013(11) 1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RL.11-12.1]
ELA2013(11) 2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.11-12.2]
ELA2013(11) 3. Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). [RL.11-12.3]
ELA2013(11) 10. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]
ELA2013(11) 11. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text. [RI.11-12.2]
ELA2013(11) 12. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. [RI.11-12.3]
ELA2013(11) 15. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text. [RI.11-12.6]
ELA2013(11) 18. By the end of Grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the Grades 11-College and Career Readiness (CCR) text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RI.11-12.10]
ELA2013(11) 21. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.11-12.3]
Local/National Standards:  
Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will be able to:

Explain the difference between a symbol and a motif.

Explain the purpose of stream of consciousness narration.

Evaluate how stream of consciousness is established and maintained in a nonfiction selection.

Describe how stream of consciousness impacts the tone and effectiveness of a nonfiction work.

Evaluate the introduction and development of a motif in a literary work.

 

Additional Learning Objective(s):  
Approximate Duration of the Lesson: 31 to 60 Minutes
Materials and Equipment:

Copies of Margaret Atwood's "Bread" for each student.

Yellow highlight

Color pencils or markers

Storyboard (paper version) template for essay analysis

Technology Resources Needed:

Interactive whiteboard

 

Background/Preparation:

Hard copies of "Bread" and the story board handout must be made before class.

Student pairs/groups should be pre-assigned before beginning activity. 

Students should be able to identify and describe the following point of view-narrative technique:

1st person (singular) point of view, 1st person (plural) point of view, 2nd person point of view, 3rd person limited, 3rd person omniscient. 

Students should also be able to identify and explain the significance of a symbol in various types of literature.

Procedures/Activities:

 1. Students should read "Bread" by Margaret Atwood.

 2. After reading the passage, students should pair up and complete the following:

  • Discuss the meaning and purpose of the work.
  • Highlight (in yellow) any words or phrases that are repeated throughout the essay.

 3. Student pairs should complete a basic “storyboard” analyzing the development of Atwood’s essay.  Each frame should include the following:                                                          

    --The first sentence from each paragraph should be in the top row.                                                                   

    --An illustration of the activity in the paragraph should be in the second row.                                                                                                        

    --The setting and action involving the bread should be in the third row.

  4. As a class, students should discuss the use of stream of consciousness in “Bread.” Students should be able to explain how Atwood does not follow a chronologic time line in the selection.

  5. On their individual "hard copies" of the essay, students should draw a slash (/) each time Atwood shifts thoughts or ideas.  Students should turn to the person sitting next to them and compare annotations.

  6. As a class students should explore how Atwood depicts her “multitude of thoughts” throughout the passage.

  6. As a class students should also discuss how the bread takes on greater significance throughout the passage.

  7. Students will be able to explain how Atwood develops the “bread” motif throughout her essay.

 


Attachments:**Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download. MargaretAtwood’sBread.docx
Assessment Strategies:

Teacher will walk around the room monitoring student discussion/participation.

Students will submit their group text annotations and explanations.

Students will create storyboards depicting the changes in setting and action as the author shifts between thoughts and develops (expands) the motif in the essay. 

Extension:

This lesson can be extended in the following ways:

Students can compose an original stream of consciousness work that uses one motif.

Students can use Animoto to create a digital representation of Margaret Atwood's "Bread."

 

Remediation:

Students will be grouped according to skill level as a means of increasing participation and mastery from weaker students.

Students can also be grouped in groups of three/four to increase creativity and variety of responses.

Also, dividing the essay into individual paragraphs and asking each pair to complete one frame representing their paragraph.  Allow student pairs to share their frames with the class. You might post the drawings on the wall as student samples of work.

Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior

Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.
Variations Submitted by ALEX Users:
Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

Hosted by Alabama Supercomputer Authority
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
Thinkfinity
Thinkfinity
Best of the Web

Web Design by: Digital Mason LLC