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This lesson provided by:
Author: Mary Rease
System:Etowah County
School:Highland Elementary School
Lesson Plan ID: 33200
Title:

Listening Comprehension Read Aloud-

Who Was Ruby Bridges?

Overview/Annotation:

Listening to narrative text offers students a chance to go beyond decoding and word meaning. Listening as the teacher reads a story gives gives students an opportunity to appreciate, draw significance and meaning as well as informal practice using  story elements. Listening to read-a-louds gives the teacher the opportunity to model "close" reading skills as well as model thinking.

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.

Content Standard(s):
ELA2013(2) 1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RL.2.1]
ELA2013(2) 2. Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral. [RL.2.2]
ELA2013(2) 3. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. [RL.2.3]
ELA2013(2) 5. Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action. [RL.2.5]
ELA2013(2) 7. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. [RL.2.7]
ELA2013(2) 29. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about Grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. [SL.2.1]
ELA2013(2) 32. Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences. [SL.2.4]
SS2010(K) Living and Working Together in Family and Community12. Describe families and communities of the past, including jobs, education, transportation, communication, and recreation.
SS2010(1) Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State4. Identify contributions of diverse significant figures that influenced the local community and state in the past and present. (Alabama)
SS2010(1) Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State6. Compare ways individuals and groups in the local community and state lived in the past to how they live today. (Alabama)
Local/National Standards:  
Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will be able to recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud such as Who, What, When, Where Why and How.

Students will be able to recount or describe key ideas or details from a media source.

Student Friendly Objective: I can tell you what happened at the beginning of the story, the middle of the story and at the end of the story.

I can name the characters in the story.

I can name the setting of the story.

I can tell you what happened in the beginning, middle, and the end of the story.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

1. Students will be able to select and defend a word that they think best describes Ruby Bridges.

I can correctly describe a character in a book.

Approximate Duration of the Lesson: 31 to 60 Minutes
Materials and Equipment:

Picture Book- Ruby Bridges

Chart Paper

pencils

paper

List of character traits: brave, strong, sad, mean, hopeful, peacefull

Technology Resources Needed:

http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=106572

Optional download of full length movie- Ruby bridges 1 hour 20 minutes.

Background/Preparation:

  1. Giving your learners enough background knowledge is very important for their complete understanding. Before the lesson, discuss with your students that they are about to meet a little girl in the story that is very much like them. However, this little girl lived a long time ago, over 50 years ago. This little girls name is Ruby Bridges, and she didn't have the rights and or privileges we do. 

Ruby Bridges was an African-American who born in Mississippi to a family that was very poor. Her parents worked hard to provide for her, but there were many nights that there was nothing to eat for dinner. At the age of 4, Ruby and her family moved to New Orleans, Louisiana, where her parents obtained better jobs.

In 1960, the treatment of African-Americans was not equal to that of whites. Black children attended different and separate schools than white children. While it was illegal to treat African Americans different than other people, much of the south didn't comply with these laws

Tell your students that you are going to read them a story about when the laws were changed and sometimes change; even good change is not easy.

  1. Create an Anchor chart to chart your thinking as you read Ruby Bridges.

Who- Characters

When – Over 50 years ago

What- History changed

Where- New Orleans *Show on American map

How- You will chart the story of Ruby Bridges on the (How of What) How did Ruby Bridges change with History.

*** You will fill in the What and How part the most. Sequence the How as Beginning, Middle and End or Sequence if you have higher learners First, Then, Next...

Procedures/Activities:
  1. Read Ruby Bridges to your class. Set a purpose for your students to listen to the story: What kind of person was Ruby Bridges?

  2. Stop and explain words that you feel your students might not know. For example: Federal Marshals are like soldiers or police.

  3. Wonder aloud, use the voice in your head to speak to your students about your wonders, connections you are making in the story and emotions you are feeling.

  4. Define the term equality and ask children if these differences make one person better than another.

  5. Provide children with hypothetical situations in which some of the class members were given certain privileges that other students could not participate in because they were different. For example, only girls were allowed to eat their lunch in the cafeteria while the boys had to eat their lunch outside (no matter what the weather was like). Or, children who were left handed had to attend a different school from those right-handed children. Ask students how they would feel if they couldn't do everything that other children could do just because they were different in some way. Emphasize that although we may be very different from one another, we are all equal and that we each deserve the same opportunities and privileges. Reinforce what the meaning of equality is. Allow your students opportunities to respond by asking for thumbs up if they feel the same way as Ruby Bridges or thumbs down if  they feel the differently.   When you have a majority of thumbs up or down ask your students to share with a partner their answer.
    • Some examples may be the word equality: Define the term equality and ask children if these differences make one person better than another. Provide children with imaginary situations in which some of the class members were given certain privileges that other students could not take part in because they were different. For example, only girls were allowed to eat their lunch in the lunch room while the boys had to eat their lunch outside (no matter what the weather was like). Or, children who were left handed had to attend a different school from those right-handed children. Ask students how they would feel if they couldn't do everything that other children could do just because they were different in some way. Give emphasis to the fact that although we may be very different from one another, we are all equal and that we each deserve the same opportunities and privileges. Emphasize what the meaning of equality is.
    • Be sure to restate often what happened in the Beginning, then the middle and last the end.
  6. Chart the story elements Beginning, Middle and End on your Anchor Chart.
  7. Play Corners: Have the following 4 words taped up in the 4 corners of your classroom:
    • patient courageous/brave
    • hopeful peaceful
    • Corners- Ask your students to pay attention to the following statement: Patient, Courageous, Hopeful and Peaceful. Have students partner talk about each word. Clarify meaning if you feel they do not fully understand character trait words. Then ask your students to choose "The word that best describes Ruby Bridges is..." Ask students to decide which word they agree with most and ask them to stand in that corner. Make sure that the children know what each of the words mean before you expect them to successfully accomplish this activity. As a group, students should discuss their reasons behind choosing their word and then explain it to the rest of the class.

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Assessment Strategies:

Formative- Corners game

Formative- Partner Talk, Choral responses

Formative- Ask students to describe Ruby Bridges in one sentence. Ask students to tell what happened in the beginning, the middle and the end of the story.

Watch the Video of Ruby Bridges: Write a story about yourself as Ruby Bridges best friend.

or

Ask students to write a paragraph about what Ruby Bridges is doing now.  Then read, share and discuss special ending of book.

Extension:

To extend the lesson have students write themselves into the story as either the main character or her friend.

Remediation:

For your lower level students, set only one goal or objective. Choose either Character Traits, or Story Elements.

Some of the vocabulary may be difficult for some of your students.  Make sure you clarify words and continue to monitor comprehension using question and student responses.

Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior

Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.
Variations Submitted by ALEX Users:
Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

Hosted by Alabama Supercomputer Authority
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
Thinkfinity
Thinkfinity
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