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Overcoming The Great Depression
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This podcast/vodcast is a beautiful gathering of research and interviews regarding what life was like during the Great Depression. 


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Shaking the Foundations: Alabama in the 1930's and 1940's
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us as Leah Rawls Atkins presents Shaking the Foundations: Alabama in the 1930s and 1940s. This presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. The Great Depression and World War II were watershed years for the state of Alabama. From the poverty and despair of the most severe economic depression in American history, the state began to emerge from the hard times to prosper from the billion-dollar economic development that poured into Alabama to finance defense and, later, war industries and military bases. Alabama took a leadership role in preparing the nation for war and training and supplying troops. From air bases, such as Maxwell Field, to forts such as Fort McClellan, to military camps, such as Camp Rucker; to the steel mills of Birmingham and the Port of Mobile ship-building operations; to the men and women who volunteered; from the aluminum plants to the explosives plants, Alabama was a vital cog in the nation’s defense. The driving forces in these years shook the foundations of politics and society, forcing Alabama to face challenges in a new world. Dr. Leah Rawls Atkins retired in 1995 after a decade with Auburn University’s Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities, where she directed four major NEH-funded librarybased public programs: “The Civil War: Crossroads of Our Being,” “World War II: Home Front/ War Fronts,” “Reading Our Lives: Southern Autobiography,” and “Read Alabama!” She taught history at Auburn and at Samford University. She was the secretary of the Alabama Historical Association (AHA) and has served as president of both the AHA and the Association of Alabama Historians. She was on the founding board of the Friends of the Archives, and she presently serves on the board of the Archives and History Foundation and the Cahaba Foundation, which is devoted to preserving the site of Alabama’s first capital. She has authored and a co-authored many works including Alabama: The History of a Deep South State and a fourth-grade Alabama history textbook. Her centennial history of the Alabama Power Company won AHA’s Sulzby Award in 2006. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353-4712.


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A Strange New Bird: The Airplane Comes to Alabama
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought continues another year of informative talks on Alabama history at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Join us as Billy J. Singleton presents A Strange New Bird: The Airplane Comes to Alabama. The first century of powered flight in Alabama began in February 1910 with the arrival of Wilbur Wright in the capital city of Montgomery. In search of a suitable location to establish a spring training camp for student aviators, Wright selected Montgomery as the site of the nation’s first civilian pilot training school because of the region’s genial climate and suitable grounds. The establishment of the Wright flying school marked the beginning of a remarkable aviation heritage in Montgomery, a legacy further enhanced by the evolution of military aviation on the former site of the flying school of the Wright Brothers. The same factors that attracted the Wrights to Montgomery made the area an ideal location for the establishment of military flight training and aerospace education programs, and formed the foundation of the first century of powered flight in Alabama. Billy Singleton has been involved in the aviation industry for more than three decades. Recently retired as a pilot for a major airline, he continues to fly as a corporate pilot based in Birmingham. A native of Alabama, Singleton serves as chairman of the Alabama Aviation Hall of Fame, vice-chairman of the Wright Brothers / Maxwell Field Museum project, and member of the Board of Directors of the Southern Museum of Flight. He received a bachelor’s degree from Troy State University and a Master of Aeronautical Science degree from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. He is the author of Images of Aviation: Montgomery Aviation and num erous articles relating to aviation history and safety. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353‐4726.


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