Professional Learning Podcast Treasury Lesson Plans Personal Workspace Site Search ALEXville Learning Assets Home Courses of Study

ALEX Podcasts


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
The Cotton State
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. While many think of antebellum Alabama as a state of magnolias and cotton plantations, that picture tells only part of the story. This program will show how three groups – white yeomen farmers, planter elites, and enslaved African Americans – together created the “cotton state” in Alabama. It will begin with a description of the differences between life in the yeoman sections of the state – the hill counties and the Wiregrass – and life in the plantation areas – the Black Belt and the Tennessee Valley. Each of these groups contributed to and shaped Alabama society and antebellum politics. The program will examine some of the “hot” political topics of the time – the state bank, congressional districting, taxation, state aid for railroads, and secession from the Union. Montgomery - native J. Mills Thornton is a professor of history at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Professor Thornton received his bachelor’s degree with high honors from Princeton University in 1966, and his doctorate from Yale University in 1974, joining the faculty of the University of Michigan in that year. His book, Politics and Power in a Slave Society: Alabama, 1800-1860, published in 1978, received the Dunning Prize of the American Historical Association. His second book, Dividing Lines: Municipal Politics and the Struggle for Civil Rights in Montgomery, Birmingham and Selma, published in 2002, received the Liberty Legacy Prize of the Organization of American Historians. During 2007-08, he served as the Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at the University of Cambridge in England. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
The Land of Alabama
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought will celebrate the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us for the first in the series at noon on Thursday, January 15 as John Hall presents The Land of Alabama, a talk on the physical geography and geology of Alabama. This presentation will be held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. The varied landscape of the state is often taken for granted, but the state is the result of a half- billion years of changes. It has endured continental collision, the up-thrusting of a mountain range, deposition of a giant coastal plain—twice—and the recent massive erosion of its valleys. It has survived near-misses by glaciers, strikes by giant meteorites and its mountains being worn flat and thrust up again. Parts of it have been sea bottoms full of giant reptiles while dinosaurs roamed its hills and valleys. All this before the Indians arrived and made it theirs. This presentation will introduce the physical landscape of the state and set the stage for the talks to come in the rest of the 2009 ArchiTreats series. John Hall is presently Curator of the new Black Belt Museum at the University of West Alabama. He is the retired chief naturalist at the University of Alabama - Museum of Natural History in Tuscaloosa and is a well-known Alabama naturalist and teacher. He specializes in the connections of science and history in Alabama. He is well-known for his programs on botanist William Bartram and the Sylacauga meteorite. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353-4712.


Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

Hosted by Alabama Supercomputer Authority
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
Thinkfinity
Thinkfinity
Best of the Web

Web Design by: Digital Mason LLC