Professional Learning Podcast Treasury Lesson Plans Personal Workspace Site Search ALEXville Learning Assets Home Courses of Study

ALEX Podcasts


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird
Overview:
This podcast is a brief overview of the life of Harper Lee. Harper Lee is the author of To Kill a Mockingbird, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel that was published in 1960.


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
W.C. Handy  Father of the Blues
Overview:
This is a podcast created by a student for her assignment on researching a Famous Black Alabamian during the month of February. She chose to research and report on W.C. Handy. She used her research findings and compiled the important information about Handy into a podcast. Her goal was to educate others about this famous Black Alabamian and his achievements.


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
Like It Ain't Never Passed
Overview:
This video takes you through the history of Sloss Furnace from its opening as an iron furnace to its reopening as a museum. Sloss made Birmingham, AL the thriving city it is today. Pictures tell the story of how Birmingham went from a small country town to a bustling city that grew up around the furnaces. It's astonishing growth and prosperity earned it the nicknames "The Pittsburg of the South" and "The Magic City." Sloss made Birmingham the world's largest producer of cast iron pipe, the nation's 3rd largest producer of pig iron, and the foremost industrial city of the South. Though Sloss closed its doors in 1971 its history lives on today through the museum that was opened 101 years after Sloss began making iron.


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
Old St. Stephens:  Where Alabama Began
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought begins another year of informative talks on Alabama history at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Join us as George Shorter presents Old St. Stephens: Where Alabama Began. Located on the Tombigbee River in southwest Alabama, Old St. Stephens is one of the most important historical and archaeological sites in the state. During a brief three decades, from the 1790s to its decline in the 1820s, St. Stephens was the site of a Spanish fort, an American fort and trading post, and the Alabama Territorial capital, as well as the place w here the legislature met when Alabama became a state. The Alabama Department of Tourism has designated 2010 as the Year of Alabama Small Towns and Downtowns. This program will explore the history of one of Alabama’s earliest towns ‐ Old St. Stephens, Where Alabama Began. George Shorter received Landscape Architecture and Anthropology degrees from LSU. Since 1995 he has worked as a Research Associate at the Center for Archaeological Studies at the University of South Alabama. His research focuses on colonial occupations and early settlement during the 18th and early 19th centuries, and includes projects at Old Mobile (1702‐1711), Port Dauphin Village (1702‐1720s), the French stockade on Dauphin Island (1702‐1718), and various other French colonial sites in the Mobile area. He also recently completed two years of research at Fort Morgan. For the past twelve years he has dire cted archaeological projects at Old St. Stephens. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353‐4726.


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
The Civil Rights Movement in Alabama
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us as Odessa Woolfolk presents The Civil Rights Movement in Alabama. This presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Alabama, the ‘Cradle of the Confederacy,’ was the setting for many of the most nationally significant battles of the Civil Rights Movement. The events of that era were initiated by ordinary people with uncommon courage. This presentation will highlight the mass activism which occurred in local communities around the state, and the importance of leaders and footsoldiers. Odessa Woolfolk grew up in Birmingham, Alabama. She received a BA in history from Talladega College and a MA in Urban Studies from Occidental College in California and she was a National Urban Fellow at Yale University. Her professional career includes high school and college teaching, as well as public administration in New York and Washington, D.C. She served in various capacities at the University of Alabama for over 20 years. She is the Founding President and Chairman Emeritus of the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353-4712.


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
The New South: A Social & Economic View
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us as Marlene Rikard presents The New South: A Social and Economic View. This presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Post-Reconstruction Alabama experienced major social and economic changes in the era known as the “New South,” a term coined by Henry Grady of the Atlanta Constitution. Emancipation of the slaves and falling cotton prices brought changes in agriculture for plantation owners, African Americans, and poor whites. Although farming remained the occupation of most Alabamians, industrialization became the mantra of new leaders who promised recovery and prosperity though the development of the state’s natural resources in mining and manufacturing. But prosperity proved elusive and change brought conflict in the form of strikes, segregation and Jim Crow laws, political turmoil, and battles over temperance, woman’s suffrage, regulation of public utilities, and convict leasing. The era changed Alabama forever. Dr. Marlene Hunt Rikard recently retired as Professor of History at Samford University. Following graduation from Auburn University, she began her work life as a graphic designer before returning to school for graduate work in history and teaching for thirty-five years. She was also Director of Samford’s London Programs for over a decade. She has served as president of the Southern Association of Women Historians, the Alabama Association of Historians, and the Alabama Historical Association. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353-4712.


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
Cast in Iron
Overview:
Sloss Furnaces carries a rich legacy that began in the post-Civil War South and continues through to today. It was founded in 1882 by James Withers Sloss who paid only $180,000 to have it built. Sloss Furnaces became a symbol of pride and progress in the South. It was the first to export iron overseas and helped make Birmingham, AL a thriving city. Listen as historians take you through Sloss's legacy and ironworkers recount what it was like to work inside its walls.  


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald
Overview:
Each year, fourth grade students at Lakewood Elementary School research people who have made a significant contribution to society. We dress up like those people and share what we learn about them in our wax museum exhibit. Other students, teachers, and parents come see what we've learned. As each guest approaches us, we share the biography of our famous person - just like you'd see in the real wax museums. It's a lot of work to prepare...and a lot of fun to share. We're glad we can share our wax museum exhibit with you.


Thinkfinity Podcasts


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details

Subject: Cross-Disciplinary - History , Cross-Disciplinary - Informal Education , Cross-Disciplinary - Technology , Physical Education - Adventure and Risk Challenge Activities , Physical Education - Outdoor Education , Science - Space Sciences , Social Studies - Technology and Civilization , Social Studies - United States History , Social Studies - World History , Informal Education - Academic Enrichment , Informal Education - Environmental Education , Informal Education - Technology Training , Informal Education - Zoo/Aquarium/Nature Center Education
Title: How Can You Talk Without Speaking?     
Description: On June 27, 1880, Helen Adams Keller was born in Tuscumbia, Alabama. Left blind and deaf after a childhood illness, Helen conquered long odds to learn to communicate. Come along as we take a closer look at sign language!
Thinkfinity Partner: Wonderopolis
Grade Span: K,PreK,1,2,3,4,5



Web Resources: Podcasts


Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
Martin Luther King, Jr: Animated Video Biography
http://www.brainpop....
This animated BrainPOP video provides a clear, concise review of the life and works of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. There are also links to a related activity, quiz, and famous quotes. *This video is free and can be viewed with no account set-up.

Save to ALEX | Share Share | Show Details
The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow
http://www.teachertu...
This documentary demonstrates the mistreatment of African Americans between Reconstruction and the Civil Rights Movement.

Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

Hosted by Alabama Supercomputer Authority
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
Thinkfinity
Thinkfinity
Best of the Web

Web Design by: Digital Mason LLC