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The First Alabamians
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought will celebrate the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us for the second presentation in the series at noon on Thursday, February 19 as Craig Sheldon presents The First Alabamians. This presentation will be held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. For the past 12,000 years, the land now known as Alabama has been occupied by a series of Indian cultures. Beginning in the Pliestocene, or Late Ice Age, these groups evolved from small hunting and gathering societies in numerous small tribes to powerful agricultural chiefdoms supporting the mostly highly developed American Indian cultures north of Mexico. Severely devastated by early 16th century Spanish expeditions, Indian cultures reconstructed themselves to become the historic Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Cherokee Indians. This presentation briefly outlines the six major archaeological periods of Alabama prehistory and early history with emphasis upon some of the pivotal cultural innovations such as pottery, architecture, trade, agriculture, and ceremonialism. Born in Fairhope, Alabama, Craig Sheldon was educated at the University of Alabama and the University of Oregon where he received a Ph.D. in Anthropology. His fields of interest include archaeology, ethnohistory and architecture of the southeastern United States and Mesoamerica, and subsistence technology. He has concentrated upon the culture, history, archaeology, and architecture of the historic Creeks of Alabama and Georgia. He has presented over 30 papers and written over 20 articles, reports, and books. He is a member of the Alabama Historical Commission and the Council for Alabama Archaeology. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. View a chronology View a resource list View an annotated bibliography


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The Creek Indians in Alabama
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us for the third presentation in the series as Kathryn Braund presents The Creek Indians in Alabama. Once the newly established state of Alabama extended sovereignty over the tribe, it effectively ended the existence of the Creek Nation in their traditional homeland. In her talk, Dr. Braund will explore the main themes in Creek Indian history, including trade and land, diversity and division, and change and continuity. Drawing on both the written record and historical artifacts, Dr. Braund will explore the complex story of Alabama when it was owned and ruled by the Creek Indians. Dr. Kathryn Braund is Professor of History at Auburn University and has authored or edited four books relating to the southeastern Indians. Her first book, Deerskins and Duffels: The Creek Indian Trade with Anglo-America, 1685–1815, was the first to extensively examine the Creek deerskin trade, especially the impact of commercial hunting on all aspects of Indian society. She has also written on William Bartram, an eighteenth-century botanist whose published account of his southern Travels is an American literary classic, and on James Adair, a deerskin trader whose account of his life among the southeastern Indians was published in London in 1775. Dr. Braund has also published scholarly articles on the southeastern Indians during the American Revolution, Creek gender and work roles, and race relations and slavery among the Indians. She also has contributed to several encyclopedias and reference works. Currently, she is researching the Creek War of 1813-1814. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


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Investigation Roanoke: A Quest for Truth
Overview:
Roanoke is the first Colony established in Virginia. Unfortunately, some mysterious event occurred leaving experts baffled at what may have made an entire colony disappear. Based on historical research, students will explain their theories on what may have happened.


Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

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The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
Thinkfinity
Thinkfinity
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