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ALEX Podcasts


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Reflections on My Life in Alabama History
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us as Wayne Flynt presents Reflections on My Life in Alabama History. This presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and His tory. Wayne Flynt perhaps is Alabama’s best‐known living historian. While many people know him through his teaching and writing, few are aware that he was a minister before he became a historian. Living in Alabama for more than half of the twentieth century, Flynt viewed and studied events through a ‘double vision’ of historian and minister. In this presentation, Flynt will reflect upon and suggest an ethical vision for the long sweep of Alabama history. He will examine how the state failed to fulfill its own moral vision, and how that failure crippled the state. At the same time he will suggest positive aspects of the e. state, focusing on its attachment to tradition, community, family, honor, and endurance. Wayne Flynt has lived in Alabama most of his life, growing up in Birmingham, Dothan and Anniston. He holds degrees from Samford University (formerly Howard College) and Florida State University. Flynt is Professor Emeritus, having served as chairman of the History Department at Auburn University. He is the author of eleven books, including Alabama in the Twentieth Century and the Pulitzer Prize‐nominated Poor but Proud: Alabama’s Poor Whites. He is co‐author of Alabama: A History of a Deep South State, which also was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. He also serves as the editor‐in‐chief of the o nline Encyclopedia of Alabama. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353‐4726.


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A Strange New Bird: The Airplane Comes to Alabama
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought continues another year of informative talks on Alabama history at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Join us as Billy J. Singleton presents A Strange New Bird: The Airplane Comes to Alabama. The first century of powered flight in Alabama began in February 1910 with the arrival of Wilbur Wright in the capital city of Montgomery. In search of a suitable location to establish a spring training camp for student aviators, Wright selected Montgomery as the site of the nation’s first civilian pilot training school because of the region’s genial climate and suitable grounds. The establishment of the Wright flying school marked the beginning of a remarkable aviation heritage in Montgomery, a legacy further enhanced by the evolution of military aviation on the former site of the flying school of the Wright Brothers. The same factors that attracted the Wrights to Montgomery made the area an ideal location for the establishment of military flight training and aerospace education programs, and formed the foundation of the first century of powered flight in Alabama. Billy Singleton has been involved in the aviation industry for more than three decades. Recently retired as a pilot for a major airline, he continues to fly as a corporate pilot based in Birmingham. A native of Alabama, Singleton serves as chairman of the Alabama Aviation Hall of Fame, vice-chairman of the Wright Brothers / Maxwell Field Museum project, and member of the Board of Directors of the Southern Museum of Flight. He received a bachelor’s degree from Troy State University and a Master of Aeronautical Science degree from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. He is the author of Images of Aviation: Montgomery Aviation and num erous articles relating to aviation history and safety. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353‐4726.


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The New South: A Social & Economic View
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us as Marlene Rikard presents The New South: A Social and Economic View. This presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Post-Reconstruction Alabama experienced major social and economic changes in the era known as the “New South,” a term coined by Henry Grady of the Atlanta Constitution. Emancipation of the slaves and falling cotton prices brought changes in agriculture for plantation owners, African Americans, and poor whites. Although farming remained the occupation of most Alabamians, industrialization became the mantra of new leaders who promised recovery and prosperity though the development of the state’s natural resources in mining and manufacturing. But prosperity proved elusive and change brought conflict in the form of strikes, segregation and Jim Crow laws, political turmoil, and battles over temperance, woman’s suffrage, regulation of public utilities, and convict leasing. The era changed Alabama forever. Dr. Marlene Hunt Rikard recently retired as Professor of History at Samford University. Following graduation from Auburn University, she began her work life as a graphic designer before returning to school for graduate work in history and teaching for thirty-five years. She was also Director of Samford’s London Programs for over a decade. She has served as president of the Southern Association of Women Historians, the Alabama Association of Historians, and the Alabama Historical Association. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353-4712.


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The Ellis Island Experience - Coming to America
Overview:
Make Ellis Island come alive for U.S. history students by processing younger students in a recreation of the immigration center. Recreate the uncertainty, fear, and confusion many immigrants experienced by arranging a variety of stations in a large open space. Then open Ellis Island to visitors and allow time for reflection and discussion after all immigrants have been processed. Click to hear students reflect on The Ellis Island Experience.


Thinkfinity Podcasts


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Subject: Social Studies
Title: Transportation History Videos     
Description: Three short videos provide an overview of American transportation history in three different eras: 1800-1900, 1900-1950, and 1950-2000. These videos are included in the online exhibition entitled America on the Move , which focuses on transportation in US history.
Thinkfinity Partner: Smithsonian
Grade Span: 9,10,11,12



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Subject: Social Studies
Title: Transportation Infrastructure Videos     
Description: Three short videos provide an overview of the history of America's transportation infrastructure in three eras: 1800-1900, 1900-1950, and 1950-2000. These videos are included in the online exhibition entitled America on the Move , which focuses on transportation in US history.
Thinkfinity Partner: Smithsonian
Grade Span: 9,10,11,12



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