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ALEX Podcasts


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America's Top Ten
Overview:
Throughout this podcast series, viewers will learn about ten influential eras of American History. The journey begins with the American Revolution and wraps up with President Barack Obama. As the series progresses viewers will relive pivotal events that shaped the United States. They will see the struggles and triumphs of our great country and learn about American Pride.


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Like It Ain't Never Passed
Overview:
This video takes you through the history of Sloss Furnace from its opening as an iron furnace to its reopening as a museum. Sloss made Birmingham, AL the thriving city it is today. Pictures tell the story of how Birmingham went from a small country town to a bustling city that grew up around the furnaces. It's astonishing growth and prosperity earned it the nicknames "The Pittsburg of the South" and "The Magic City." Sloss made Birmingham the world's largest producer of cast iron pipe, the nation's 3rd largest producer of pig iron, and the foremost industrial city of the South. Though Sloss closed its doors in 1971 its history lives on today through the museum that was opened 101 years after Sloss began making iron.


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Reflections on My Life in Alabama History
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us as Wayne Flynt presents Reflections on My Life in Alabama History. This presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and His tory. Wayne Flynt perhaps is Alabama’s best‐known living historian. While many people know him through his teaching and writing, few are aware that he was a minister before he became a historian. Living in Alabama for more than half of the twentieth century, Flynt viewed and studied events through a ‘double vision’ of historian and minister. In this presentation, Flynt will reflect upon and suggest an ethical vision for the long sweep of Alabama history. He will examine how the state failed to fulfill its own moral vision, and how that failure crippled the state. At the same time he will suggest positive aspects of the e. state, focusing on its attachment to tradition, community, family, honor, and endurance. Wayne Flynt has lived in Alabama most of his life, growing up in Birmingham, Dothan and Anniston. He holds degrees from Samford University (formerly Howard College) and Florida State University. Flynt is Professor Emeritus, having served as chairman of the History Department at Auburn University. He is the author of eleven books, including Alabama in the Twentieth Century and the Pulitzer Prize‐nominated Poor but Proud: Alabama’s Poor Whites. He is co‐author of Alabama: A History of a Deep South State, which also was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. He also serves as the editor‐in‐chief of the o nline Encyclopedia of Alabama. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353‐4726.


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Modern Alabama
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us as Harvey H. Jackson presents Modern Alabama. This presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. How do you define “Modern Alabama?” Is it just a slice of time – 1945 to the present – in which Alabama became something it wasn’t before? Will a comparison of then (pre-1945) and since, really define us as “modern?” Or should we be measured against some abstract concept of modernity, some scholarly checklist of what a state must and must not be and do to be “modern?” In his talk, Jackson will compare us to what we used to be, measure us against what “smart folks” say a state must be to be modern, and reach some sort of a conclusion about what we are today. Harvey H. (Hardy) Jackson, III grew up in Grove Hill, Alabama where he attended local public schools. He is a graduate of Marion Military Institute, Birmingham Southern College, the University of Alabama, and the University of Georgia. He has taught at colleges and universities in Florida and Georgia, and is currently Jacksonville State University Professor and Eminent Scholar in History. Jackson is the author, co-author, or co-editor of eleven books on various aspects of southern history. His most recent book, Inside Alabama: A Personal History of My State, won the Alabama Historical Association C. J. Coley Award. He is also working on a history of the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico since World War II, tentatively entitled “The Rise and Decline of the ‘Redneck Riviera.’” This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353-4712.


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Shaking the Foundations: Alabama in the 1930's and 1940's
Overview:
ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us as Leah Rawls Atkins presents Shaking the Foundations: Alabama in the 1930s and 1940s. This presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. The Great Depression and World War II were watershed years for the state of Alabama. From the poverty and despair of the most severe economic depression in American history, the state began to emerge from the hard times to prosper from the billion-dollar economic development that poured into Alabama to finance defense and, later, war industries and military bases. Alabama took a leadership role in preparing the nation for war and training and supplying troops. From air bases, such as Maxwell Field, to forts such as Fort McClellan, to military camps, such as Camp Rucker; to the steel mills of Birmingham and the Port of Mobile ship-building operations; to the men and women who volunteered; from the aluminum plants to the explosives plants, Alabama was a vital cog in the nation’s defense. The driving forces in these years shook the foundations of politics and society, forcing Alabama to face challenges in a new world. Dr. Leah Rawls Atkins retired in 1995 after a decade with Auburn University’s Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities, where she directed four major NEH-funded librarybased public programs: “The Civil War: Crossroads of Our Being,” “World War II: Home Front/ War Fronts,” “Reading Our Lives: Southern Autobiography,” and “Read Alabama!” She taught history at Auburn and at Samford University. She was the secretary of the Alabama Historical Association (AHA) and has served as president of both the AHA and the Association of Alabama Historians. She was on the founding board of the Friends of the Archives, and she presently serves on the board of the Archives and History Foundation and the Cahaba Foundation, which is devoted to preserving the site of Alabama’s first capital. She has authored and a co-authored many works including Alabama: The History of a Deep South State and a fourth-grade Alabama history textbook. Her centennial history of the Alabama Power Company won AHA’s Sulzby Award in 2006. This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353-4712.


Thinkfinity Podcasts


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Subject: Social Studies
Title: History Explorer Podcast: Japanese Internment and WWII Service     
Description: In this episode of the History Explorer podcast series, curatorial assistant Noriko Sanefuji interviews Grant Ichikawa, a US veteran who enlisted after being relocated to a Japanese American internment camp with his family in 1942 strong . strong Allowed to join the army after a need for interpreters, Mr. Ichikawa served proudly and in 2011, he and other veterans were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal for his service. Visit http://americanhistory.si.edu/podcast" this page to find images of Ichikawa.
Thinkfinity Partner: Smithsonian
Grade Span: 6,7,8,9,10,11,12



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Subject: Social Studies
Title: European Theater During World War II     
Description: Newsreel video footage from 1944 and 1945, showing the Allies prepare and carry out the invasion of Normandy, the liberation of Paris, Battle of the Bulge and the eventual fall of the Third Reich and surrender of Germany. This video is part of the Price of Freedom learning resources package for use with the Battle of the Bulge:Americans Respond to a German Surprise lesson plan. It was produced to accompany the exhibition The Price of Freedom: Americans at War , by the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.
Thinkfinity Partner: Smithsonian
Grade Span: 9,10,11,12



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Subject: Social Studies
Title: Transportation History Videos     
Description: Three short videos provide an overview of American transportation history in three different eras: 1800-1900, 1900-1950, and 1950-2000. These videos are included in the online exhibition entitled America on the Move , which focuses on transportation in US history.
Thinkfinity Partner: Smithsonian
Grade Span: 9,10,11,12



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