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Library Media/Information Literacy

Roles of the Library Media Specialist
http://www.bcps.org/offices/lis/office/index.html

Extensive school library media program information from the Baltimore County Public Schools

Alabama Virtual Library
http://www.avl.lib.al.us/

The Alabama Virtual Library provides all students, teachers, and citizens of the State of Alabama with online access to essential library and information resources.

American Association of School Librarians
http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/aasl/index.cfm

Programs, links, and standards

Anti-Plagiarism Strategies for Research Papers
http://www.virtualsalt.com/antiplag.htm

Strategies for preventing online plagiarism


K - 12

Copyright - What do you know?
http://www.uen.org/Lessonplan/preview.cgi?LPid=21713

A chart, a quiz, and a lesson designed to teach students about copyright and fair use policies.

Do you have a book? I don't know, Dewey?
http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/4015

Activities and assessments designed to teach students about the Dewey Decimal System.

Common Sense Media: Identifying High-Quality Sites (6-8)
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/identifying-high-quality-sites-6-8

In this Common Sense Media lesson, students discuss how print materials (books and newspaper or magazine articles) are published. Then they compare and contrast this process with publishing on the Internet, learning that there are no built-in checks for accuracy or quality on the Internet. Therefore, they must use their own criteria to judge the trustworthiness and usefulness of websites. After this lesson, students will be able to understand how the ease of publishing on the Internet might affect how much they can trust the content of some sites, learn criteria that will help them evaluate websites, and apply the criteria to a site to determine how trustworthy and useful it is.

Duck Duck Go
https://duckduckgo.com/

DuckDuckGo is a kid friendly search engine. Simple and easy to use for younger students. *Search anonymously (truly anonymous search) utilizing multiple search engines simultaneously (not just one) to see a more authentic representation of search results from across the internet.

LiveBinders
http://www.livebinders.com/

Live Binders is a research and organizational tool for teachers and students. It is a way to organize documents and websites like pages in a book. Students can use live binders to group information for projects and classes.

New School Brochure PBL
http://wveis.k12.wv.us/teach21/public/project/Guide.cfm?upid=3372&tsele1=4&tsele2=104

This is a project-based learning unit plan that requires students to create a brochure of their school after surveying the school layout, gathering data, and calculating time and distance required to travel across the campus.

What is a Blog?
http://www.brainpop.com/english/writing/blogs/

This animated video from BrainPOP explores the idea of blogging (what is a blog? a blogger? how does someone publish a blog?) The high production value makes for an engaging video; there are also links to related activities, lesson plans, and a quiz. *This video is free and can be viewed without setting up an account.

Going Places Safely on the Computer (K-2)
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/going-places-safely-k-2

This Common Sense Media lesson includes step-by-step instructions for teachers as they guide students through activities and discussion questions. By taking a virtual field trip, students experience the power of the Internet to take them to places they might not be able to visit in person. They learn that they should follow safety rules when they travel online, just as when traveling in the real world. *Downloading worksheets or materials requires creating a free account with Common Sense Media.

Creative Commmons Search
http://search.creativecommons.org/

Find content that you can share, use, and remix. "Our mission: Creative Commons develops, supports, and stewards legal and technical infrastructure that maximizes digital creativity, sharing, and innovation." "If you want to give people the right to share, use, and even build upon a work you’ve created, you should consider publishing it under a Creative Commons license. CC gives you flexibility (for example, you can choose to allow only non-commercial uses) and protects the people who use your work, so they don’t have to worry about copyright infringement, as long as they abide by the conditions you have specified. If you’re looking for content that you can freely and legally use, there is a giant pool of CC-licensed creativity available to you. There are hundreds of millions of works — from songs and videos to scientific and academic material — available to the public for free and legal use under the terms of our copyright licenses, with more being contributed every day."

Private Today, Public Tomorrow
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/private-today-public-tomorrow-9-12

This Common Sense Media lesson includes step-by-step instructions for teachers as they guide students through activities and discussion questions. Students read a true story about the unintended consequences of sharing a compromising photo, and then they consider how this situation might be different if someone else shared the photo. Next, students brainstorm questions they should ask themselves before posting and tagging photos, videos, or any information about others online, and create a decision tree to guide them through future choices.

Risky Online Relationships
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/risky-online-relationships

This Common Sense Media lesson includes step-by-step instructions for teachers as they guide students through activities and discussion questions. This lesson is designed to help students understand why the term “online predator” is misleading and how to identify more realistic forms of inappropriate contact. Students then discuss a story about a teen’s risky online relationship and draw conclusions about how to stay safe online.

Safe Online Talk (6-8)
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/safe-online-talk-6-8

In this Common Sense Media lesson, students first watch a short video in which teens share their rules of the road for connecting with others online. Through a guided class discussion, students then learn strategies for recognizing and responding to risky online interaction. Finally, students work in groups to rate the riskiness of several online scenarios using the provided "Internet Traffic Light Student Handout."

Trillion Dollar Footprint (6-8)
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/trillion-dollar-footprint-6-8

This Common Sense Media lesson includes step-by-step instructions for teachers as they show a provided video clip and guide students through activities and discussion questions. Students learn that they have a digital footprint, which can be searched, shared, and seen by a large, invisible audience. Discussion questions and activities lead students to recognize that people’s online information can be helpful or harmful to their reputation and image. Students also consider their own digital footprints and what they want those footprints to be like in the future.

Talking Safely Online (3-5)
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/talking-safely-online-3-5

This Common Sense Media lesson includes step-by-step instructions for teachers as they guide students through activities and discussion questions related to safe online behaviors. In this lesson, students will compare and contrast online-only friends and face-to-face pals, analyze why private information should not be given to anyone online without the permission of a trusted adult, and debate how to respond if an online-only friend asks them personal questions.

Rights, Remixes, and Respect
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/rights-remixes-and-respect

This Common Sense Media lesson includes step-by-step instructions for teachers as they guide students through activities and discussion questions. Students review their knowledge of copyright and fair use and then examine a case study involving the appropriation of music by a popular band. Students form groups in which they role-play different stakeholders in the music industry and then debate the ethical and legal issues involved in using other people’s creative work in practices such as remixes and sampling.

Rework, Reuse, Remix (6-8)
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/lesson/rework-reuse-remix-6-8

This Common Sense Media lesson includes step-by-step instructions for teachers as they guide students through activities and discussion questions related to fair use of creative content. This lesson will help students identify the key points required for a creative work to fall under fair use, judge whether or not the two case studies can be called fair use, and understand the value of fair use by reworking and remixing copyrighted material in a collage or video. *Downloading worksheets or materials requires creating a free account with Common Sense Media.

Alabama Virtual Library
Alabama Virtual Library

Hosted by Alabama Supercomputer Authority
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
The Malone Family Foundation
The Malone Family Foundation
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