ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Classroom Resources (2)


ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 35 :
35 ) Find inverse functions. [F-BF4]

a. Solve an equation of the form f(x) = c for a simple function f that has an inverse, and write an expression for the inverse. [F-BF4a]

Example: f(x) =2x3 or f(x) = (x+1)/(x-1) for x ≠ 1.

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 20 :
20 ) Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to solve problems. Include equations arising from linear and quadratic functions, and simple rational and exponential functions. [A-CED1]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 27 :
27 ) Explain why the x-coordinates of the points where the graphs of the equations y = f(x) and y = g(x) intersect are the solutions of the equation f(x) = g(x); find the solutions approximately, e.g., using technology to graph the functions, make tables of values, or find successive approximations. Include cases where f(x) and/or g(x) are linear, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions.* [A-REI11]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 31 :
31 ) Write a function defined by an expression in different but equivalent forms to reveal and explain different properties of the function. [F-IF8]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 36 :
36 ) For exponential models, express as a logarithm the solution to abct = d where a, c, and d are numbers, and the base b is 2, 10, or e; evaluate the logarithm using technology. [F-LE4]

[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 16 :
16. Compare and contrast relations and functions represented by equations, graphs, or tables that show related values; determine whether a relation is a function. Explain that a function f is a special kind of relation defined by the equation y = f(x).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 17 :
17. Combine different types of standard functions to write, evaluate, and interpret functions in context. Limit to linear, quadratic, exponential, and absolute value functions.

a. Use arithmetic operations to combine different types of standard functions to write and evaluate functions.

Example: Given two functions, one representing flow rate of water and the other representing evaporation of that water, combine the two functions to determine the amount of water in a container at a given time.

b. Use function composition to combine different types of standard functions to write and evaluate functions.

Example: Given the following relationships, determine what the expression S(T(t)) represents.

Function Input Output
G Amount of studying: s Grade in course: G(s)
S Grade in course: g Amount of screen time: S(g)
T Amount of screen time: t Number of follers: T(t)
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 21 :
21. Compare properties of two functions, each represented in a different way (algebraically, graphically, numerically in tables, or by verbal descriptions). Extend from linear to quadratic, exponential, absolute value, and general piecewise.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: Algebra II Module 3, Topic D: Using Logarithms in Modeling Situtation
URL: https://www.engageny.org/resource/algebra-ii-module-3-topic-d-overview
Description:

Module 3, Topic D opens with a hands-on simulation and modeling activity in which students gather data and apply the analysis of Lesson 22 in Topic C to model it with an exponential function (A-CED.2, F-LE.5). Students use logarithms to solve exponential equations analytically and express the solution as a logarithm (F-LE.4). Students study the relationship between exponential growth and decay and geometric series (F-IF.3), and students must use properties of exponents to interpret expressions for exponential functions (F-IF.8b). Armed with a more thorough understanding of exponential functions and equations, students revisit the topic of Newton’s Law of Cooling that was introduced in Algebra I (F-BF.1b).



   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 16 :
16 ) Explain each step in solving a simple equation as following from the equality of numbers asserted at the previous step, starting from the assumption that the original equation has a solution. Construct a viable argument to justify a solution method. [A-REI1]

[MA2015] AL1 (9-12) 17 :
17 ) Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable, including equations with coefficients represented by letters. [A-REI3]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 21 :
21 ) Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales. [A-CED2]

[MA2015] AL2 (9-12) 27 :
27 ) Explain why the x-coordinates of the points where the graphs of the equations y = f(x) and y = g(x) intersect are the solutions of the equation f(x) = g(x); find the solutions approximately, e.g., using technology to graph the functions, make tables of values, or find successive approximations. Include cases where f(x) and/or g(x) are linear, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions.* [A-REI11]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Solve quadratic equations with real coefficients that have complex solutions. [N-CN7]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 13 :
13 ) Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it. [A-SSE2]

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 21 :
21 ) Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales. [A-CED2]

[MA2015] ALT (9-12) 27 :
27 ) Explain why the x-coordinates of the points where the graphs of the equations y = f(x) and y = g(x) intersect are the solutions of the equation f(x) = g(x); find the solutions approximately, e.g., using technology to graph the functions, make tables of values, or find successive approximations. Include cases where f(x) and/or g(x) are linear, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions.* [A-REI11]

[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 5 :
5. Use the structure of an expression to identify ways to rewrite it.

Example: See x4 - y4 as (x2)2 - (y2)2, thus recognizing it as a difference of squares that can be factored as (x2 - y2)(x2 + y2).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 9 :
9. Select an appropriate method to solve a quadratic equation in one variable.

a. Use the method of completing the square to transform any quadratic equation in x into an equation of the form (x - p)2 = q that has the same solutions. Explain how the quadratic formula is derived from this form.

b. Solve quadratic equations by inspection (such as x2 = 49), taking square roots, completing the square, the quadratic formula, and factoring, as appropriate to the initial form of the equation, and recognize that some solutions may not be real.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 10 :
10. Select an appropriate method to solve a system of two linear equations in two variables.

a. Solve a system of two equations in two variables by using linear combinations; contrast situations in which use of linear combinations is more efficient with those in which substitution is more efficient.

b. Contrast solutions to a system of two linear equations in two variables produced by algebraic methods with graphical and tabular methods.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 12 :
12. Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities in context; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales and use them to make predictions. Limit to contexts arising from linear, quadratic, exponential, absolute value, and linear piecewise functions.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 14 :
14. Given a relation defined by an equation in two variables, identify the graph of the relation as the set of all its solutions plotted in the coordinate plane.
Note: The graph of a relation often forms a curve (which could be a line).
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 15 :
15. Define a function as a mapping from one set (called the domain) to another set (called the range) that assigns to each element of the domain exactly one element of the range.

a. Use function notation, evaluate functions for inputs in their domains, and interpret statements that use function notation in terms of a context. Note: If f is a function and x is an element of its domain, then f(x) denotes the output of f corresponding to the input x.

b. Relate the domain of a function to its graph and, where applicable, to the quantitative relationship it describes. Limit to linear, quadratic, exponential, and absolute value functions.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 19 :
19. Explain why the x-coordinates of the points where the graphs of the equations y = f(x) and y = g(x) intersect are the solutions of the equation f(x) = g(x).

a. Find the approximate solutions of an equation graphically, using tables of values, or finding successive approximations, using technology where appropriate.
Note: Include cases where f(x) is a linear, quadratic, exponential, or absolute value function and g(x) is constant or linear.
[MA2019] AL1-19 (9-12) 20 :
20. Graph the solutions to a linear inequality in two variables as a half-plane (excluding the boundary in the case of a strict inequality), and graph the solution set to a system of linear inequalities in two variables as the intersection of the corresponding half-planes, using technology where appropriate.
Subject: Mathematics (9 - 12), Mathematics (9 - 12)
Title: How Many Solutions?: Algebra 1, Episode 14: Unit 7, Lesson 5 | Illustrative Math
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/im20-math-ep14-75/how-many-solutions/
Description:

This video lesson builds on the idea that both graphing and rewriting quadratic equations in the form of expression = 0 are useful strategies for solving equations. It also reinforces the ties between the zeros of a function and the horizontal intercepts of its graph, which students began exploring in an earlier unit.

Here, students learn that they can solve equations by rearranging them into the form expression = 0, graphing the equation y = expression, and finding the horizontal intercepts. They also notice that dividing each side of a quadratic equation by a variable is not reliable because it eliminates one of the solutions. As students explain why certain maneuvers for solving quadratic equations are acceptable and others are not, students practice constructing logical arguments (MP3).

 



ALEX Classroom Resources: 2

Go To Top of page