ALEX Resources

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Learning Activities (3) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (5)


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. [RL.2.7]

[ARTS] VISA (2) 12 :
12) Interpret art by identifying the mood or feeling suggested by a work of art through subject matter and visual qualities.

Examples: Talk about color qualities and composition in Pablo Picasso's The Old Guitarist.

Subject: English Language Arts (2), Arts Education (2)
Title: Determining Mood
Description:

Students will be able to interpret the mood of a piece of art by describing the setting of the piece and the colors used within. 

This activity was created as a result of the Arts COS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (2) 5 :
5) Create an artwork using found and/or recycled objects.

Examples: Use objects such as leaves, rocks, paper tubes, egg cartons, etc.
Use book A Day with No Crayons by Elizabeth Rusch.

[ELA2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. [RL.2.7]

[ARTS] VISA (2) 3 :
3) Extend skills by individually following sequential steps to create works of art on subjects that are real or imaginary.

Example: Use the book A House for Hermit Crab by Eric Carle.
Create a real or imagined home.

Subject: Arts Education (2), English Language Arts (2)
Title: Creating a House: Integrating Language Arts with Visual Arts
Description:

The teacher will begin the activity with a read-aloud of A House for Hermit Crab by Eric Carle. Next, the teacher will allow students to use the illustrations in the picture book to describe the plot of the story. Then, the teacher will lead students on a "nature walk" around the school to collect items to create an imaginary house. Lastly, the students will design an imaginary home using the natural objects found on their walk while individually following sequential steps.

This activity was created as a result of the Arts COS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 5 :
5 ) Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action. [RL.2.5]

[ELA2015] (2) 6 :
6 ) Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud. [RL.2.6]

[ELA2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. [RL.2.7]

[ELA2015] (2) 12 :
12 ) Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. [RI.2.3]

[ELA2015] (2) 23 :
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section. [W.2.2]

[ELA2015] (2) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure. [W.2.3]

[DLIT] (2) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: English Language Arts (2), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Tell the Story
Description:

The Storykit app allows users to create stories using their own pictures, words and text.




ALEX Learning Activities: 3

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RL.2.1]

a. Infer the main idea and supporting details in narrative texts. (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (2) 3 :
3 ) Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges. [RL.2.3]

[ELA2015] (2) 5 :
5 ) Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action. [RL.2.5]

[ELA2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. [RL.2.7]

[ELA2015] (2) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories and poetry, in the Grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.2.10]

[ELA2015] (2) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.2.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.2.4a]

b. Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.2.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.2.4c]

[ELA2015] (2) 29 :
29 ) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about Grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. [SL.2.1]

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.2.1a]

b. Build on others' talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others. [SL.2.1b]

c. Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion. [SL.2.1c]

Subject: English Language Arts (2)
Title: Let's Talk About Stories: Shared Discussion With Amazing Grace
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/talk-about-stories-shared-57.html
Description:

This lesson gives second-grade students opportunities to interact with a thought-provoking story, as they also develop comprehension and critical-thinking skills. Students begin by listening to a read-aloud of Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman, with teacher modeling of the thinking process at key points. They then participate in partner, small-group, and whole-class discussions to revisit and respond to the text. Students finish by using the interactive Doodle Splash to visually represent the ideas they want to remember from the book. Helpful tips are embedded within the lesson for discussing difficult themes and guiding students to make respectful and thoughtful comments in a group setting.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (0) 4 :
4 ) Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. [RL.K.4]

[ELA2015] (0) 7 :
7 ) With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts). [RL.K.7]

[ELA2015] (0) 9 :
9 ) Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. [RL.K.10]

[ELA2015] (0) 16 :
16 ) With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts). [RI.K.7]

[ELA2015] (0) 24 :
24 ) Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is …). [W.K.1]

[ELA2015] (0) 25 :
25 ) Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative or explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic. [W.K.2]

[ELA2015] (0) 39 :
39 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on kindergarten reading and content. [L.K.4]

a. Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately (e.g., knowing duck is a bird and learning the verb to duck). [L.K.4a]

b. Use the most frequently occurring inflections and affixes (e.g., -ed, -s, re-, un-, pre-, -ful, -less) as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word. [L.K.4b]

[ELA2015] (0) 40 :
40 ) With guidance and support from adults, explore word relationships and nuances in word meanings. [L.K.5]

a. Sort common objects into categories (e.g., shapes, foods) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent. [L.K.5a]

b. Demonstrate understanding of frequently occurring verbs and adjectives by relating them to their opposites (antonyms). [L.K.5b]

c. Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at school that are colorful). [L.K.5c]

d. Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs describing the same general action (e.g., walk, march, strut, prance) by acting out the meanings. [L.K.5d]

[ELA2015] (1) 7 :
7 ) Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events. [RL.1.7]

[ELA2015] (1) 23 :
23 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.1.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.1.4a]

b. Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.1.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.1.4c]

[ELA2015] (1) 24 :
24 ) Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure. [W.1.1]

a. Write simple poems addressing a topic. (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. [RL.2.7]

[ELA2015] (2) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.2.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.2.4a]

b. Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.2.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.2.4c]

[ELA2015] (2) 22 :
22 ) Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section. [W.2.1]

a. Write free verse poetry to express ideas. (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (2) 38 :
38 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 2 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies. [L.2.4]

a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.2.4a]

b. Determine the meaning of the new word formed when a known prefix is added to a known word (e.g., happy/unhappy, tell/retell). [L.2.4b]

c. Use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with the same root (e.g., addition, additional). [L.2.4c]

d. Use knowledge of the meaning of individual words to predict the meaning of compound words (e.g., birdhouse, lighthouse, housefly; bookshelf, notebook, bookmark). [L.2.4d]

e. Use glossaries and beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases. [L.2.4e]

Subject: English Language Arts (K - 2)
Title: Let's Read It Again: Comprehension Strategies for English-Language Learners
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/read-again-comprehension-strategies-1045.html
Description:

Using Con Mi Hermano/With My Brother by Eileen Roe, this lesson has second grade Spanish-speaking ELLs identify the main idea of the story, construct meaning from text and illustrations, and learn English words. They then demonstrate their knowledge and practice writing in English by writing a poem and a retelling of the story. This lesson (which can be adapted using bilingual books in other languages and for other ages) also has older struggling readers read with younger students. Finally, it encourages English-speaking students in mixed classrooms to learn Spanish words for familiar people and objects.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RL.2.1]

a. Infer the main idea and supporting details in narrative texts. (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. [RL.2.7]

[ELA2015] (2) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories and poetry, in the Grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.2.10]

[ELA2015] (3) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. [RI.3.1]

[ELA2015] (3) 17 :
17 ) Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison; cause and effect; first, second, third in a sequence). [RI.3.8]

[ELA2015] (3) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.3.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.3.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.3.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.3.4c]

[ELA2015] (4) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.4.3]

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.4.3a]

b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. [W.4.3b]

c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. [W.4.3c]

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. [W.4.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.4.3e]

[ELA2015] (4) 26 :
26 ) With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three Language standards in Grades K-4.) [W.4.5]

[ELA2015] (4) 29 :
29 ) Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources. [W.4.8]

[ELA2015] (4) 31 :
31 ) Write routinely over extended time frames, including time for research, reflection, and revision, and shorter time frames such as a single sitting or a day or two for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. [W.4.10]

Subject: English Language Arts (2 - 4)
Title: Engaging With Cause-and-Effect Relationships Through Creating Comic Strips
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/engaging-with-cause-effect-30678.html
Description:

In order to fully comprehend reading materials, students need to understand the cause-and-effect relationships that appear in a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts. In this lesson, students learn cause-and-effect relationships through the sharing of a variety of Laura Joffe Numeroff picture books in a Reader's Workshop format. Using online tools or a printed template, students create an original comic strip via the writing prompt, “If you take a (third) grader to….” Students use various kinds of art to illustrate their strip and publish and present their completed piece to peers in a read-aloud format.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (1) 7 :
7 ) Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events. [RL.1.7]

[ELA2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. [RL.2.7]

[ELA2015] (4) 1 :
1 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RL.4.1]

[SS2010] LWT1 (1) 6 :
6 ) Compare ways individuals and groups in the local community and state lived in the past to how they live today. (Alabama)

•  Identifying past and present forms of communication
Examples: past—letter, radio, rotary-dial telephone

present—e-mail, television, cellular telephone

•  Identifying past and present types of apparel
•  Identifying past and present types of technology
Examples: past—record player, typewriter, wood-burning stove

present—compact diskette (CD) and digital video diskette (DVD) players, video cassette recorder (VCR), computer, microwave oven

•  Identifying past and present types of recreation
Examples: past—marbles, hopscotch, jump rope

present—video games, computer games

•  Identifying past and present primary sources
Examples: past—letters, newspapers

present—e-mail, Internet articles

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] ALA (4) 6 :
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
Subject: English Language Arts (1 - 4), Social Studies (1 - 4)
Title: Read "Dakota Dugout"
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/sodhouse/sodhouse_readdakota.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students read Dakota Dugout by Ann Turner. They look at an object that would have been important to a woman living in a sod house and try to determine what the object is.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. [RL.2.7]

[ELA2015] (4) 1 :
1 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RL.4.1]

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 11 :
11 ) Interpret legends, stories, and songs that contributed to the development of the cultural history of the United States.

Examples: American Indian legends, African-American stories, tall tales, stories of folk heroes

[SS2010] ALA (4) 11 :
11 ) Describe the impact of World War I on Alabamians, including the migration of African Americans from Alabama to the North and West, utilization of Alabama's military installations and training facilities, and increased production of goods for the war effort.

•  Recognizing Alabama participants in World War I, including Alabama's 167th Regiment of the Rainbow Division
•  Identifying World War I technologies, including airplanes, machine guns, and chemical warfare
Subject: English Language Arts (2 - 4), Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Read "Follow the Drinking Gourd"
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/slavelife/slave_readgourd.pdf
Description:

In this activity, students will increase their knowledge about slaves, slavery, and the underground railroad by reading Follow the Drinking Gourd by Jeannette Winters. Students will write and illustrate a poem or letter playing the role of a conductor, agent, or passenger on the underground railroad.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 5

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