ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (8) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (2) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (4)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[ELA2015] (2) 12 :
12 ) Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. [RI.2.3]

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 2 :
2 ) Identify national historical figures and celebrations that exemplify fundamental democratic values, including equality, justice, and responsibility for the common good.

•  Recognizing our country's founding fathers, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Patrick Henry, John Adams, John Hancock, and James Madison
•  Recognizing historical female figures, including Abigail Adams, Dolley Madison, Harriet Tubman, and Harriet Beecher Stowe
•  Describing the significance of national holidays, including the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Presidents' Day; Memorial Day; the Fourth of July; Veterans Day; and Thanksgiving Day
•  Describing the history of American symbols and monuments
Examples: Liberty Bell, Statue of Liberty, bald eagle, United States flag, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

Subject: English Language Arts (2), or Social Studies (2)
Title: Time After Time: How Can We Use Timelines to Reconstruct the Past? Part 1 
Description:

The lesson will focus on ordering common events by times, days, months, steps, or events.  Students will work collaboratively in groups to organize five child-focused events, steps, or times.   These titles, events, steps, days, and times will be cut apart so that students need to organize them into a logical sequence. Groups will rotate through the five events to practice daily schedules, holidays, school schedules, weekly events, and procedural texts. Groups may take a picture of completed events as a digital copy or the teacher may check each group for formative assessment.

This unit was created as part of the ALEX Interdisciplinary Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2019] (2) 17 :
17. Measure the length of an object by selecting and using standard units of measurement shown on rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, or measuring tapes.
[ELA2015] (2) 12 :
12 ) Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. [RI.2.3]

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[MA2019] (2) 22 :
22. Create a number line diagram using whole numbers and use it to represent whole-number sums and differences within 100.
Subject: English Language Arts (2), or Mathematics (2), or Social Studies (2)
Title: Time After Time: How Can We Use Timelines to Reconstruct the Past? Part 3
Description:

The lesson will focus on creating a timeline. The teacher and students will work together to collect data from teachers around the school. Using this data, students will work to complete a class timeline and formulate questions to ask others about their completed timeline. This lesson will require four 30-45 minute sessions to complete.

This unit was created as part of the ALEX Interdisciplinary Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[MA2019] (2) 22 :
22. Create a number line diagram using whole numbers and use it to represent whole-number sums and differences within 100.
[MA2019] (2) 17 :
17. Measure the length of an object by selecting and using standard units of measurement shown on rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, or measuring tapes.
[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[ELA2015] (2) 12 :
12 ) Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. [RI.2.3]

Subject: English Language Arts (2), or Mathematics (2), or Social Studies (2)
Title: Time After Time: How Can We Use Timelines to Reconstruct the Past? Part 4
Description:

This lesson will focus on creating timelines. Students will use important dates from their lives to create a personal 5 event timeline. Students will use rulers to measure equal spaces for their timelines. This lesson will require two 1 hour sessions. The first lesson will include the lesson introduction, work on timelines and time for formative assessments as students work. The second session will be used to complete timelines, share projects, and complete exit tickets.

Sample of completed timeline:

IMG_4501.jpg

 

Video sample of completed timeline: https://goo.gl/1JwF0I

 

This unit was created as part of the ALEX Interdisciplinary Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [CE] (0-12) 4 :
4 ) Honesty

[ELA2015] (1) 25 :
25 ) Write informative or explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure. [W.1.2]

[ELA2015] (1) 31 :
31 ) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about Grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. [SL.1.1]

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.1.1a]

b. Build on others' talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges. [SL.1.1b]

c. Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion. [SL.1.1c]

[ELA2015] (1) 32 :
32 ) Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. [SL.1.2]

[ELA2015] (1) 33 :
33 ) Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood. [SL.1.3]

[ELA2015] (1) 34 :
34 ) Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly. [SL.1.4]

[ELA2015] (1) 36 :
36 ) Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation. (See Grade 1 Language standard 37 for specific expectations.) [SL.1.6]

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[ELA2015] (2) 34 :
34 ) Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (See Grade 2 Language standards 35 and 37 for specific expectations.) [SL.2.6]

[ELA2015] (2) 36 :
36 ) Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.2.2]

a. Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names. [L.2.2a]

b. Use commas in greetings and closings of letters. [L.2.2b]

c. Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives. [L.2.2c]

d. Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage → badge; boy → boil). [L.2.2d]

e. Form uppercase and lowercase letters in cursive. (Alabama)

f. Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings. [L.2.2e]

[SS2010] LWT (0) 11 :
11 ) Identify symbols, customs, famous individuals, and celebrations representative of our state and nation. (Alabama)

Examples: symbols—United States flag, Alabama flag, bald eagle (Alabama)

customs—pledging allegiance to the United States flag, singing "The Star-Spangled Banner"

individuals—George Washington; Abraham Lincoln; Squanto; Martin Luther King, Jr.

celebrations—Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Veterans Day

[SS2010] LWT2 (2) 2 :
2 ) Identify national historical figures and celebrations that exemplify fundamental democratic values, including equality, justice, and responsibility for the common good.

•  Recognizing our country's founding fathers, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Patrick Henry, John Adams, John Hancock, and James Madison
•  Recognizing historical female figures, including Abigail Adams, Dolley Madison, Harriet Tubman, and Harriet Beecher Stowe
•  Describing the significance of national holidays, including the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Presidents' Day; Memorial Day; the Fourth of July; Veterans Day; and Thanksgiving Day
•  Describing the history of American symbols and monuments
Examples: Liberty Bell, Statue of Liberty, bald eagle, United States flag, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial

Subject: Character Education (K - 12), or English Language Arts (1 - 2), or Social Studies (K - 2)
Title: President's Day for Special Education/Early Elementary
Description:

This lesson helps special education/early elementary students learn about George Washington and Abraham Lincoln and discuss how each demonstrated the character trait of honesty.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RI.2.1]

[ELA2015] (2) 11 :
11 ) Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text. [RI.2.2]

[ELA2015] (2) 16 :
16 ) Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text. [RI.2.7]

[ELA2015] (2) 15 :
15 ) Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. [RI.2.6]

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

Subject: English Language Arts (2)
Title: Reading Like a Detective
Description:

This lesson is about using detective skills to be better nonfiction readers. Students will gather clues from the text to make assumptions and connections that will solve, and make meaning about the text. The students will use nonfiction text context clues, and pictures to realize that the author’s purpose is for them to find ALL the clues and make meaning of a topic.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [CE] (0-12) 4 :
4 ) Honesty

[ELA2015] (2) 2 :
2 ) Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral. [RL.2.2]

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[ELA2015] (2) 30 :
30 ) Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. [SL.2.2]

Subject: Character Education (K - 12), or English Language Arts (2)
Title: The Empty Pot
Description:

This lesson will help students identify the moral of the story The Empty Pot by Demi. During this lesson, students will have an opportunity to discuss and write about the character trait honesty. Students will share about a time when they demonstrated this character trait.

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 8 :
8 ) Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures. [RL.2.9]

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[ELA2015] (2) 29 :
29 ) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about Grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. [SL.2.1]

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.2.1a]

b. Build on others' talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others. [SL.2.1b]

c. Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion. [SL.2.1c]

[ELA2015] (2) 22 :
22 ) Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section. [W.2.1]

a. Write free verse poetry to express ideas. (Alabama)

Subject: English Language Arts (2)
Title: Giddy Up Cinderella
Description:

Students will read two different western versions of the story Cinderella. They will engage in activities where they will compare and contrast different versions of the story.  Students will participate in listening, speaking, and writing activities that require them to reflect on the stories.

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [CE] (0-12) 25 :
25 ) Perseverance

[ELA2015] (2) 15 :
15 ) Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. [RI.2.6]

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[ELA2015] (3) 15 :
15 ) Distinguish their own point of view from that of the author of a text. [RI.3.6]

[ELA2015] (3) 29 :
29 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. [W.3.8]

Subject: Character Education (K - 12), or English Language Arts (2 - 3)
Title: A Weed is a Flower
Description:

In this lesson, students will learn to identify the main purpose of a text and distinguish it from their own point of view with the book A Weed is a Flower:  The Life of George Washington Carver by Aliki and other informational texts.

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 5 :
5 ) Differentiate between a physical map and a political map.

Examples: physical—illustrating rivers and mountains

political—illustrating symbols for states and capitals

•  Using vocabulary associated with geographical features, including latitude, longitude, and border
[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

Subject: Social Studies (2), English Language Arts (2)
Title: Which Direction? Latitude and Longitude
Description:

This activity uses YouTube as its digital resource. "Longitude and Latitude Meaning Definition for Kids" is a video that explains the definitions of latitude and longitude. The students will also engage in a Quick Write about the video relating to our essential question, What do the geographical terms latitude and longitude mean? Afterward, the students will participate in a hands-on activity.

This activity results from the ALEX Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2), English Language Arts (2)
Title: Shared Research: Habitats
Description:

After students have had a lesson on the "Super 3!" research method and how to maneuver the Alabama Virtual Library site, students will complete a shared research activity answering the essential question: How do animals adapt to the area in which they live? The teacher will model how to research using the PebbleGo database from the Alabama Virtual Library.  Finally, students will complete an extension activity where they will research a specific animal and how it survives in its own habitat.

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS COS Resource Development Summit.




ALEX Learning Activities: 2

Go To Top of page
ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (0) 10 :
10 ) With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. [RI.K.1]

[ELA2015] (0) 19 :
19 ) Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. [RI.K.10]

[ELA2015] (0) 31 :
31 ) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. [SL.K.1]

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.K.1a]

b. Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges. [SL.K.1b]

[ELA2015] (1) 41 :
41 ) Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships (e.g., because). [L.1.6]

[ELA2015] (2) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RI.2.1]

[ELA2015] (2) 14 :
14 ) Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently. [RI.2.5]

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[SC2015] (0) 5 :
5 ) Construct a model of a natural habitat (e.g., terrarium, ant farm, diorama) conducive to meeting the needs of plants and animals native to Alabama.

Subject: English Language Arts (K - 2), Science (K)
Title: Digging Up Details on Worms: Using the Language of Science in an Inquiry Study
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/digging-details-worms-using-917.html
Description:

Foregrounding scientific vocabulary, these integrated lesson plans invite students to research worms in order to create a classroom habitat. Students are first introduced to inquiry notebooks and then use them to record what they already know about worms. Next, students observe the cover of a fiction book about worms and make a hypothesis on whether the book is fact or fiction, and then check their hypotheses after the book is read aloud. Next, after an introduction to related scientific words such as hypothesis, habitat, attribute, predator, and prey, students conduct and record research and findings in their inquiry notebooks. Once they have gathered the necessary information, students plan and build a worm habitat, which becomes the springboard for further scientific exploration, observation, and experimentation.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (0) 3 :
3 ) With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. [RL.K.3]

[ELA2015] (0) 4 :
4 ) Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text. [RL.K.4]

[ELA2015] (0) 6 :
6 ) With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story and define the role of each in telling the story. [RL.K.6]

[ELA2015] (0) 7 :
7 ) With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts). [RL.K.7]

[ELA2015] (0) 9 :
9 ) Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. [RL.K.10]

[ELA2015] (1) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. [RI.1.1]

[ELA2015] (1) 11 :
11 ) Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. [RI.1.2]

[ELA2015] (1) 13 :
13 ) Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text. [RI.1.4]

[ELA2015] (1) 15 :
15 ) Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text. [RI.1.6]

[ELA2015] (1) 16 :
16 ) Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas. [RI.1.7]

[ELA2015] (1) 17 :
17 ) Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text (e.g., eating a balanced meal, obeying safety rules, engaging in recycling projects). [RI.1.8]

[ELA2015] (1) 19 :
19 ) With prompting and support, read informational texts appropriately complex for Grade 1. [RI.1.10]

[ELA2015] (2) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.2.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.2.4a]

b. Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.2.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.2.4c]

[ELA2015] (2) 26 :
26 ) With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. [W.2.6]

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[ELA2015] (3) 27 :
27 ) With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others. [W.3.6]

[ELA2015] (3) 28 :
28 ) Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. [W.3.7]

[ELA2015] (3) 29 :
29 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. [W.3.8]

[ELA2015] (4) 32 :
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.4.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.4.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.4.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others. [SL.4.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. [SL.4.1d]

[ELA2015] (4) 37 :
37 ) Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation. (See Grade 4 Language standards 38 and 40 for specific expectations.) [SL.4.6]

[ELA2015] (4) 40 :
40 ) Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. [L.4.3]

a. Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely.* [L.4.3a]

b. Choose punctuation for effect.* [L.4.3b]

c. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion). [L.4.3c]

[ELA2015] (4) 41 :
41 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.4.4]

a. Use context (e.g., definitions, examples, or restatements in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.4.4a]

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., telegraph, photograph, autograph). [L.4.4b]

c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases. [L.4.4c]

[ELA2015] (4) 43 :
43 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being (e.g., quizzed, whined, stammered) and that are basic to a particular topic (e.g., wildlife, conservation, and endangered when discussing animal preservation). [L.4.6]

[ELA2015] (5) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text. [RL.5.2]

[ELA2015] (5) 7 :
7 ) Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem). [RL.5.7]

Subject: English Language Arts (K - 5)
Title: Designing Elements of Story in Little Blue and Little Yellow
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/designing-elements-story-little-30739.html
Description:

Through multimodal activities, students will explore key elements of design such as color, shape, size, texture, density, and layout to understand and appreciate how these elements combine to convey meaning in Little Blue and Little Yellow, by Leo Lionni. Using art and digital media, they will then create their own designs to express meaning for setting, character relationships, and plot. Students will realize how to use design elements to read images and how meaning in picture books is equally conveyed in both words and images.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RI.2.1]

[ELA2015] (2) 14 :
14 ) Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently. [RI.2.5]

[ELA2015] (2) 19 :
19 ) By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the Grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RI.2.10]

[ELA2015] (2) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.2.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.2.4a]

b. Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.2.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.2.4c]

[ELA2015] (2) 23 :
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section. [W.2.2]

[ELA2015] (2) 27 :
27 ) Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations). [W.2.7]

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[ELA2015] (2) 29 :
29 ) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about Grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. [SL.2.1]

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.2.1a]

b. Build on others' talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others. [SL.2.1b]

c. Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion. [SL.2.1c]

Subject: English Language Arts (2)
Title: Predicting and Gathering Information With Nonfiction Texts
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/predicting-gathering-information-with-316.html
Description:

The reading community recognizes nonfiction as vital to early learners. This concept is relatively new, and most primary teachers have little experience with how to introduce nonfiction to their students and use it as part of the reading curriculum. This lesson supports second-grade teachers in introducing nonfiction to their students and using it for informational purposes. Students develop an understanding of nonfiction through peer interaction and hands-on experiences with books. They use graphic organizers to record their thinking and new learning.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RI.2.1]

[ELA2015] (2) 12 :
12 ) Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. [RI.2.3]

[ELA2015] (2) 19 :
19 ) By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the Grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RI.2.10]

[ELA2015] (2) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.2.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.2.4a]

b. Read on-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.2.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.2.4c]

[ELA2015] (2) 23 :
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section. [W.2.2]

[ELA2015] (2) 25 :
25 ) With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing. [W.2.5]

[ELA2015] (2) 27 :
27 ) Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations). [W.2.7]

[ELA2015] (2) 28 :
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]

[ELA2015] (2) 30 :
30 ) Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. [SL.2.2]

Subject: English Language Arts (2)
Title: I Wonder: Writing Scientific Explanations With Students
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/wonder-writing-scientific-explanations-872.html
Description:

If you have ever had your class interrupted by a thunderstorm or by a bug crawling across the carpet, you know that students naturally question the world around them. This lesson encourages second-grade students to ask questions about a specific topic, choose a particular question to explore in detail, and research the question using a variety of resources. Students organize their information on a "What we think we know," "What we have confirmed we know," and "New facts we have learned through research" (TCF) chart. They then collaborate to write a class scientific explanation.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 4

Go To Top of page