ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (2) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (3) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (9)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2019] (6) 24 :
24. Represent numerical data graphically, using dot plots, line plots, histograms, stem and leaf plots, and box plots.

a. Analyze the graphical representation of data by describing the center, spread, shape (including approximately symmetric or skewed), and unusual features (including gaps, peaks, clusters, and extreme values).

b. Use graphical representations of real-world data to describe the context from which they were collected.
[MA2015] (6) 27 :
27 ) Recognize that a measure of center for a numerical data set summarizes all of its values with a single number, while a measure of variation describes how its values vary with a single number. [6-SP3]

[ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

Subject: English Language Arts (6), or Mathematics (6), or Mathematics (6)
Title: Forecasting Statistics
Description:

Students will research the ten day weather forecast. They will document the high's for ten days as well as the low's for ten days. Once students document this information, they will find the mean, median, mode, and range of the data collected.

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RL.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 10 :
10 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.6.10]

[ELA2015] (6) 16 :
16 ) Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text. [RI.6.6]

[ELA2015] (6) 17 :
17 ) Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. [RI.6.7]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[ELA2015] (6) 34 :
34 ) Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. [SL.6.4]

Subject: English Language Arts (6)
Title: Socratic Seminar About Non-Conformity
Description:

Students will participate in a Socratic Seminar to discuss the idea of non- conformity as a relative theme in the novel Stargirl. Students will refer to text annotations and class discussions (completed TPFASTT optional) to make contributions to the student-led discussion.  

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (7) 1 :
1 ) Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.7.1]

[ELA2015] (7) 3 :
3 ) Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). [RL.7.3]

[ELA2015] (6) 5 :
5 ) Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. [RL.6.5]

[ELA2015] (6) 23 :
23 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.6.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.6.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.6.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. [W.6.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. [W.6.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.6.3e]

[ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (7) 22 :
22 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.7.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.7.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.7.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. [W.7.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. [W.7.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events. [W.7.3e]

[ELA2015] (8) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.8.2]

[ELA2015] (8) 22 :
22 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.8.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.8.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.8.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another, and show the relationships among experiences and events. [W.8.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. [W.8.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events. [W.8.3e]

[ELA2015] (8) 1 :
1 ) Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.8.1]

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 8)
Title: Novel Postcards-Using Textual Evidence to Explore Character and Setting
Description:

The students will create a postcard using textual evidence from a novel to create an image (setting) from the novel for the front.  The students will choose two main characters from the novel and write the message of the postcard from the point of view of one of the characters. They will use textual evidence to create a message from one main character to the other depicting the scene and describing the character's thoughts and feelings.

This activity results from the ALEX Resource Development Summit




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 29 :
29 ) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. [W.6.9]

a. Apply Grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics"). [W.6.9a]

b. Apply Grade 6 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not"). [W.6.9b]

[ELA2015] (6) 10 :
10 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.6.10]

[DLIT] (6) 34 :
28) Define assistive technologies and state reasons they may be needed.

Subject: English Language Arts (6), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6)
Title: Out of My Mind: Learning About the Impact of Assistive Technologies Through Literature
Description:

In conjunction with reading Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper, students will explore the world of assistive technologies and how they are impacting our world today. Students will begin by using Wordle.net and create a piece of word art to show their understanding of the main character in the book. They will then explore how assistive technologies influenced our understanding of the main character through reading an informational article about assistive technologies. 

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS COS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

Subject: English Language Arts (6)
Title: Always Play Your A.C.E.!
Description:

In this activity, the teacher will introduce the Answer, Cite, Explain (A.C.E.) strategy to help students answer questions that require text evidence. The students will practice answering text evidence questions using a text of the teacher's choice.

This activity results from the ALEX Resource Gap Project.




ALEX Learning Activities: 3

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 1 :
1 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RL.4.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[SS2010] ALA (4) 14 :
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
[SS2010] USS6 (6) 9 :
9 ) Critique major social and cultural changes in the United States since World War II.

•  Identifying key persons and events of the modern Civil Rights Movement
Examples: persons—Martin Luther King Jr.; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis (Alabama)

events—Brown versus Board of Education, Montgomery Bus Boycott, student protests, Freedom Rides, Selma-to-Montgomery Voting Rights March, political assassinations (Alabama)

•  Describing the changing role of women in United States' society and how it affected the family unit
Examples: women in the workplace, latchkey children

•  Recognizing the impact of music genres and artists on United States' culture since World War II
Examples: genres—protest songs; Motown, rock and roll, rap, folk, and country music

artists—Elvis Presley, the Beatles, Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, Hank Williams (Alabama)

•  Identifying the impact of media, including newspapers, AM and FM radio, television, twenty-four hour sports and news programming, talk radio, and Internet social networking, on United States' culture since World War II
Subject: English Language Arts (4 - 6), Social Studies (4 - 6)
Title: Hank Aaron Reading Comprehension - Online
URL: https://mrnussbaum.com/hank-aaron-reading-comprehension-online
Description:

This reading comprehension activity from MrNussbaum.com contains a historical passage about Hank Aaron.  Students can read this passage as an introductory lesson or as an assessment using the questions included.  Students receive immediate feedback on multiple-choice questions. Students may click on "listen" to have the passage read to them. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RL.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 3 :
3 ) Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution. [RL.6.3]

[ELA2015] (6) 5 :
5 ) Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. [RL.6.5]

[ELA2015] (6) 8 :
8 ) Differentiate among odes, ballads, epic poetry, and science fiction. (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (6) 10 :
10 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.6.10]

[ELA2015] (7) 21 :
21 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. [W.7.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison or contrast, and cause and effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.7.2a]

b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. [W.7.2b]

c. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. [W.7.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.7.2d]

e. Establish and maintain a formal style. [W.7.2e]

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. [W.7.2f]

[ELA2015] (7) 39 :
39 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.7.4]

a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.7.4a]

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., belligerent, bellicose, rebel). [L.7.4b]

c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. [L.7.4c]

d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). [L.7.4d]

[ELA2015] (7) 41 :
41 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. [L.7.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 7)
Title: Exploring Change Through Allegory and Poetry
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/exploring-change-through-allegory-1082.html?tab=1#tabs
Description:

Change is an inevitable part of life the challenges many young adults. Understanding and accepting change are key components in career and future planning. In this lesson, students explore the theme of change through allegory and poetry by reading an example of literary allegory and creating their own pictorial allegories. Students first define allegory and complete a pictorial allegory—or "me tree"—that displays phrases describing their interests, trails, and dreams on outlines of their hands. Next, they read and discuss a text, such as Shel Silverstein's The Giving Tree or Sandy Stryker's Tonia the Tree ;that addresses change, and then review basic literary concepts as they complete a literary elements map and plot diagram. Finally, students further explore change, and what it means to them, as they write diamante poems related to the theme of change.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RL.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 4 :
4 ) Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone. [RL.6.4]

[ELA2015] (6) 5 :
5 ) Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. [RL.6.5]

[ELA2015] (6) 6 :
6 ) Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text. [RL.6.6]

[ELA2015] (6) 8 :
8 ) Differentiate among odes, ballads, epic poetry, and science fiction. (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (6) 10 :
10 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.6.10]

[ELA2015] (6) 11 :
11 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 12 :
12 ) Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RI.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 13 :
13 ) Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes). [RI.6.3]

[ELA2015] (6) 14 :
14 ) Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings. [RI.6.4]

[ELA2015] (6) 15 :
15 ) Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas. [RI.6.5]

[ELA2015] (6) 17 :
17 ) Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. [RI.6.7]

[ELA2015] (6) 19 :
19 ) Compare and contrast one author's presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person). [RI.6.9]

[ELA2015] (7) 27 :
27 ) Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. [W.7.8]

[ELA2015] (7) 30 :
30 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.7.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.7.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.7.1b]

c. Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others' questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed. [SL.7.1c]

d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views. [SL.7.1d]

[ELA2015] (7) 39 :
39 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.7.4]

a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.7.4a]

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., belligerent, bellicose, rebel). [L.7.4b]

c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. [L.7.4c]

d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). [L.7.4d]

[ELA2015] (7) 41 :
41 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. [L.7.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 7)
Title: What is Poetry? Contrasting Poetry and Prose
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/what-poetry-contrasting-poetry-30738.html
Description:

Studying poetry creates rich opportunities to encourage critical reading and thinking, as students analyze how poetry differs from prose in structure, form, purpose, and language. This lesson begins with a quick-write and a general discussion of the essential question What is poetry? Students are then reminded that different texts require different responses from readers, and to illustrate the differences they explore a poem and a prose selection on the same topic. Students discuss the two texts in cooperative groups, using a list of guiding questions. Each group then develops a list of descriptive statements about poetry, and the groups share their statements during a whole-class discussion that reconsiders the original question.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (5) 7 :
7 ) Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem). [RL.5.7]

[ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RL.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 10 :
10 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.6.10]

[ELA2015] (7) 22 :
22 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.7.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.7.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.7.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. [W.7.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. [W.7.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events. [W.7.3e]

[ELA2015] (7) 23 :
23 ) Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 20-22 above.) [W.7.4]

[ELA2015] (7) 24 :
24 ) With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-7.) [W.7.5]

[ELA2015] (7) 29 :
29 ) Write routinely over extended time frames, including time for research, reflection, and revision, and shorter time frames such as a single sitting or a day or two for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. [W.7.10]

Subject: English Language Arts (5 - 7)
Title: The Mysteries of Harris Burdick: Using Illustrations to Guide Writing
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/mysteries-harris-burdick-using-30606.html
Description:

Mysteries are a great way to hook students into writing about fictional happenings. In this lesson, students engage themselves in The Mysteries of Harris Burdick by examining the illustrations in the book and choosing one for which to create a Mystery Cube and then a creative writing piece. Finally, students present their mysteries to the class and allow students to guess to which illustration their mystery corresponds.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RL.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 3 :
3 ) Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution. [RL.6.3]

[ELA2015] (6) 5 :
5 ) Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or plot. [RL.6.5]

[ELA2015] (6) 9 :
9 ) Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics. [RL.6.9]

[ELA2015] (6) 10 :
10 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.6.10]

[ELA2015] (8) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.8.2]

[ELA2015] (8) 5 :
5 ) Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style. [RL.8.5]

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 8)
Title: Using Picture Books to Explore Identity, Stereotyping, and Discrimination
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/using-picture-books-explore-952.html
Description:

Often simple texts can be effective vehicles for complex ideas. In this lesson, three picture books depict characters that are different from others in their communities. Each book deals with questions of identity, stereotyping, and discrimination. Sixth- through eighth-grade students are challenged to analyze these concepts through class discussions and writing. In addition to filling out a chart identifying how these three concepts are dealt with in each book, students summarize each story to analyze basic elements. After students understand some of the causes of discrimination, they discuss concrete actions they can take to stop it.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RL.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 23 :
23 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.6.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.6.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.6.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. [W.6.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. [W.6.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.6.3e]

[ELA2015] (7) 1 :
1 ) Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.7.1]

[ELA2015] (7) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.7.2]

[ELA2015] (7) 22 :
22 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.7.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.7.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.7.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. [W.7.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. [W.7.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events. [W.7.3e]

[ELA2015] (8) 1 :
1 ) Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.8.1]

[ELA2015] (8) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.8.2]

[ELA2015] (8) 22 :
22 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.8.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.8.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.8.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another, and show the relationships among experiences and events. [W.8.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events. [W.8.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events. [W.8.3e]

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 8)
Title: Book Report Alternative: Comic Strips and Cartoon Squares
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/book-report-alternative-comic-195.html
Description:

Students examine graphic novels and comic books and discuss the important components of the genre, such as captions, dialogue, and images. They then use an online tool to create a six-panel comic highlighting six key scenes in a book they have read. By creating comic strips or cartoon squares featuring characters in books, students are encouraged to think analytically about the characters, events, and themes they've explored in ways that expand their critical thinking by focusing on crystallizing the significant points of the book in a few short scenes.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 10 :
10 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.6.10]

[ELA2015] (6) 11 :
11 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 12 :
12 ) Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RI.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 17 :
17 ) Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. [RI.6.7]

[ELA2015] (6) 19 :
19 ) Compare and contrast one author's presentation of events with that of another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person). [RI.6.9]

[ELA2015] (7) 21 :
21 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. [W.7.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison or contrast, and cause and effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.7.2a]

b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. [W.7.2b]

c. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. [W.7.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.7.2d]

e. Establish and maintain a formal style. [W.7.2e]

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. [W.7.2f]

[ELA2015] (7) 23 :
23 ) Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 20-22 above.) [W.7.4]

[ELA2015] (7) 26 :
26 ) Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation. [W.7.7]

[ELA2015] (7) 27 :
27 ) Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. [W.7.8]

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 7)
Title: Finding the Science Behind Science Fiction Through Paired Readings
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/finding-science-behind-science-927.html
Description:

Science fiction has the potential to spark lively discussions while inviting students to extrapolate from their own working knowledge of scientific principles. This genre offers a human lens to what can otherwise be a complex science concept. In this lesson, students will be able to explore the genre of science fiction, while learning more about the science integrated into the plot of the story using nonfiction texts and resources. They first define the science fiction genre and then read and discuss science fiction texts. Next, they conduct research to find science facts that support or dispute the science included in the plot of the science fiction book they read. Students then revisit their definition of the genre and revise based on their reading. Finally, students complete a project that examines the science fiction genre in relation to real-world science concepts and topics.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RL.6.2]

[ELA2015] (7) 21 :
21 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. [W.7.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison or contrast, and cause and effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.7.2a]

b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. [W.7.2b]

c. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. [W.7.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.7.2d]

e. Establish and maintain a formal style. [W.7.2e]

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. [W.7.2f]

[ELA2015] (7) 23 :
23 ) Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 20-22 above.) [W.7.4]

[ELA2015] (7) 24 :
24 ) With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-7.) [W.7.5]

[ELA2015] (7) 26 :
26 ) Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation. [W.7.7]

[ELA2015] (7) 27 :
27 ) Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. [W.7.8]

[ELA2015] (7) 29 :
29 ) Write routinely over extended time frames, including time for research, reflection, and revision, and shorter time frames such as a single sitting or a day or two for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. [W.7.10]

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 7)
Title: Twenty-First Century Informational Literacy: Integrating Research Techniques and Technology
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/twenty-first-century-informational-30581.html?tab=1#tabs
Description:

This lesson incorporates graphic novels to help students expand their reading, writing, research, and technology skills. Students first read graphic novels to become familiar with the text structure, then research a self-selected topic using web-based resources. Students follow the research process and synthesize the information they obtained to create their graphic novel using the Comic Life software or other comic software. This unit works best with students who are already familiar with writing a research paper.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 22 :
22 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. [W.6.2]

a. Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison or contrast, and cause and effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.6.2a]

b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. [W.6.2b]

c. Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. [W.6.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.6.2d]

e. Establish and maintain a formal style. [W.6.2e]

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the information or explanation presented. [W.6.2f]

[ELA2015] (6) 23 :
23 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.6.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.6.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.6.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. [W.6.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. [W.6.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.6.3e]

[ELA2015] (6) 42 :
42 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. [L.6.6]

[ELA2015] (7) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.7.2]

[ELA2015] (7) 5 :
5 ) Analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning. [RL.7.5]

[ELA2015] (8) 4 :
4 ) Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. [RL.8.4]

[ELA2015] (8) 39 :
39 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words or phrases based on Grade 8 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.8.4]

a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.8.4a]

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., precede, recede, secede). [L.8.4b]

c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. [L.8.4c]

d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). [L.8.4d]

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 8)
Title: Color of Silence: Sensory Imagery in Pat Mora's Poem
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/color-silence-sensory-imagery-1104.html
Description:

This classroom resource is an engaging lesson plan from ReadWriteThink that allows students to explore how writers use sensory imagery as a literary device to make the text more meaningful for the reader.  The lesson begins with the students using all of their senses to describe known objects such as pasta, chocolate, or grapes. Students first feel and listen to the object, in a bag, before taking it out of the bag to look at, smell, and taste it. They then use at least three senses to write a poem about the object they've described.  Next, they evaluate how this literary device functions in Pat Mora's poem “Echoes.” As students read this poem, they look for sensory images and write an explanation of how these images contribute to the meaning of Mora's poem. Finally, students think about how sensory images work in their own poems and then make appropriate revisions to their work.  The resource includes links to student interactives and printable handouts.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 9

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