ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (2) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (3) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (9)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] ES6 (6) 10 :
10 ) Use research-based evidence to propose a scientific explanation regarding how the distribution of Earth's resources such as minerals, fossil fuels, and groundwater are the result of ongoing geoscience processes (e.g., past volcanic and hydrothermal activity, burial of organic sediments, active weathering of rock).

[ELA2015] (6) 27 :
27 ) Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate. [W.6.7]

[ELA2015] (6) 29 :
29 ) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. [W.6.9]

a. Apply Grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics"). [W.6.9a]

b. Apply Grade 6 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not"). [W.6.9b]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

Subject: English Language Arts (6), or Science (6)
Title: The Distribution and Creation of Fossil Fuels: A Collaborative Jigsaw Research Project
Description:

Students will begin this lesson by accessing their prior knowledge on Earth's natural resources through a brainstorming activity. The teacher will introduce the topic of fossil fuels, which are non-renewable resources such as coal, oil, and natural gas. The teacher will lead students in utilizing the jigsaw literacy strategy, in which students will become members of a home group and an expert group as they research and discuss their assigned topic. This lesson will culminate with students creating a presentation in the form of a research paper, poster, or slideshow to demonstrate their knowledge of the distribution and creation of fossil fuels.

This lesson results from a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 1 :
1 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RL.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RL.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 10 :
10 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.6.10]

[ELA2015] (6) 16 :
16 ) Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text. [RI.6.6]

[ELA2015] (6) 17 :
17 ) Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. [RI.6.7]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[ELA2015] (6) 34 :
34 ) Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation. [SL.6.4]

Subject: English Language Arts (6)
Title: Socratic Seminar About Non-Conformity
Description:

Students will participate in a Socratic Seminar to discuss the idea of non- conformity as a relative theme in the novel Stargirl. Students will refer to text annotations and class discussions (completed TPFASTT optional) to make contributions to the student-led discussion.  

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 27 :
27 ) Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate. [W.6.7]

[DLIT] (6) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (8) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[HE] (6) 1 :
6.1.1) Describe the interrelationship between social and emotional health in adolescence.

a. . Identify how positive relationships can enhance each dimension of health.

b. Explain how stress can affect personal health.

[DLIT] (7) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (7) 20 :
14) Discuss current events related to emerging technologies in computing and the effects such events have on individuals and the global society.

[ELA2015] (7) 26 :
26 ) Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation. [W.7.7]

[ELA2015] (7) 30 :
30 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.7.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.7.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.7.1b]

c. Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others' questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed. [SL.7.1c]

d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views. [SL.7.1d]

[HE] (7) 1 :
7.1.1) Summarize the interrelationship of emotional, social, and physical health.

a. Determine how peers may affect the six dimensions of health.

b. Illustrate how changing family dynamics can affect health.

Examples: divorce, relocating, death

[DLIT] (8) 20 :
14) Analyze current events related to computing and their effects on education, the workplace, individuals, communities, and global society.

[ELA2015] (8) 26 :
26 ) Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. [W.8.7]

[ELA2015] (8) 30 :
30 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.8.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.8.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.8.1b]

c. Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to others' questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations, and ideas. [SL.8.1c]

d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views in light of the evidence presented. [SL.8.1d]

[HE] (8) 1 :
8.1.1) Explain how emotional, intellectual, physical, spiritual, mental, and social health affect each other.

a. Determine how social influences can affect physical health.

b. Describe how risky health behaviors affect the emotional, physical, and social health of adolescents.

[HE] (8) 8 :
8.2.3) Analyze the influences of technology on personal and family health.

Examples: screen time, video game addictions, activity trackers, diabetes monitor, heart monitor, fitness assessment tools

[DLIT] (9-12) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (9-12) 17 :
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

[ELA2015] (9) 26 :
26 ) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. [W.9-10.7]

[ELA2015] (9) 30 :
30 ) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 9 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. [SL.9-10.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. [SL.9-10.1a]

b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. [SL.9-10.1b]

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. [SL.9-10.1c]

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented. [SL.9-10.1d]

[ELA2015] (10) 27 :
27 ) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; and synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. [W.9-10.7]

[ELA2015] (10) 31 :
31 ) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. [SL.9-10.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. [SL.9-10.1a]

b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. [SL.9-10.1b]

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions. [SL.9-10.1c]

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented. [SL.9-10.1d]

[ELA2015] (11) 25 :
25 ) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. [W.11-12.7]

[ELA2015] (11) 29 :
29 ) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. [SL.11-12.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. [SL.11-12.1a]

b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed. [SL.11-12.1b]

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives. [SL.11-12.1c]

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task. [SL.11-12.1d]

[ELA2015] (12) 25 :
25 ) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question, including a self-generated question, or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. [W.11-12.7]

[ELA2015] (12) 29 :
29 ) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. [SL.11-12.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. [SL.11-12.1a]

b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed. [SL.11-12.1b]

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives. [SL.11-12.1c]

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task. [SL.11-12.1d]

[HE] HED (9-12) 2 :
HE.1.2) Describe the interrelationships of emotional, mental, physical, social, spiritual, and environmental health.

a. Identify symptoms and methods of treatment of mental health disorders, including depression, and stress.

b. Identify warning signs and prevention strategies for suicide.

[HE] HED (9-12) 9 :
HE.2.2) Describe the pros and cons of the use of technology as it affects personal, family, and community health.

Examples: positive and negative influences on self-esteem, addiction to technology, personal interactions and relationships

[HUM] ED07 (9-12) 2 :
2 ) Analyze cultural influences on health behaviors, including social norms, laws and regulations, family traditions, and stereotypes that impact the health and wellness of individuals and families.

Examples: knowledge, attitude, and beliefs related to family eating habits; Alabama's graduated driver license to promote safe driving

[HUM] ED07 (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Evaluate positive and negative impacts of technology on health.

Examples: positive—improved diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases and disorders

-  negative—decreased level of health-enhancing physical activity, inflationary expense of health care services

[HUM] ED07 (9-12) 9 :
9 ) Analyze the relationship of dimensions of health and wellness, including emotional, intellectual, physical, social, environmental, and spiritual factors that impact the health and wellness of individuals and families.

•  Applying decision-making strategies to achieve and improve personal health goals
Example: participating regularly in physical activity, avoiding sexual risk-taking, preventing abuse, practicing water safety, operating motor vehicles safely
[HUM] ED08 (9-12) 18 :
18 ) Assess ways technology impacts individuals and families throughout the life cycle.

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 12), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 12), Health Education (6 - 12), Human Services (9 - 12)
Title: The Consequences of Being Too Plugged In-- Part 2 of Unplug: The Digital Diet Plan
Description:

Students will be introduced to five negative consequences of a poor "digital device diet." The teacher will lead students in utilizing the jigsaw literacy strategy, in which students will become members of a home group and an expert group as they research and discuss their assigned topic. The activity will culminate with students creating a presentation in the form of a research paper, poster, or slideshow to demonstrate their knowledge of the five consequences of a poor digital diet and their effect on all aspects of health. 




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[SS2010] USS6 (6) 6 :
6 ) Identify causes and consequences of World War II and reasons for the United States' entry into the war.

•  Locating on a map Allied countries and Axis Powers
•  Locating on a map key engagements of World War II, including Pearl Harbor; the battles of Normandy, Stalingrad, and Midway; and the Battle of the Bulge
•  Identifying key figures of World War II, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Sir Winston Churchill, Harry S. Truman, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Michinomiya Hirohito, and Hideki Tōjō
•  Describing the development of and the decision to use the atomic bomb
•  Describing human costs associated with World War II
Examples: the Holocaust, civilian and military casualties

•  Explaining the importance of the surrender of the Axis Powers ending World War II
Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6), English Language Arts (6), Social Studies (6)
Title: Problem Solving the Decision to End World War II with the Atomic Bomb
Description:

In this activity, students will use De Bono’s Six Thinking Hats, a problem-solving process, to discuss and evaluate the United States’ decision to use atomic weapons on Japan during World War II. This activity will allow students to think critically about this big decision while looking at it through a multitude of perspectives. By the end of this activity, the students will come to a decision as to what they would have done if they were to make this difficult decision.

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS COS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] ES6 (6) 10 :
10 ) Use research-based evidence to propose a scientific explanation regarding how the distribution of Earth's resources such as minerals, fossil fuels, and groundwater are the result of ongoing geoscience processes (e.g., past volcanic and hydrothermal activity, burial of organic sediments, active weathering of rock).

[ELA2015] (6) 27 :
27 ) Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate. [W.6.7]

[ELA2015] (6) 29 :
29 ) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. [W.6.9]

a. Apply Grade 6 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres [e.g., stories and poems; historical novels and fantasy stories] in terms of their approaches to similar themes and topics"). [W.6.9a]

b. Apply Grade 6 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., "Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not"). [W.6.9b]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

Subject: Science (6), English Language Arts (6)
Title: Literacy Strategies in the Science Classroom: Collaborative Jigsaw Research
Description:

This strategy guide will provide teachers with the background knowledge needed to implement the Jigsaw Cooperative Learning Technique in their classroom. The digital tool explains the research basis of this technique, provides tips for integrating this strategy in the classroom and offers links to related resources. 




ALEX Learning Activities: 3

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 23 :
23 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.6.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.6.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.6.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. [W.6.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. [W.6.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.6.3e]

[ELA2015] (6) 25 :
25 ) With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three Language standards in Grades K-6.) [W.6.5]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

Subject: English Language Arts (6)
Title: Developing Story Structure With Paper-Bag Skits
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/developing-story-structure-with-1024.html
Description:

In this lesson, students will engage in an interactive activity that will enhance their understanding of story structure and story elements. After the teacher models the process of developing a plot, students work in cooperative groups to create semi-impromptu skits. Paper bags containing five unique props are distributed to each group; these props provide the impetus for the development of creative skits. Students then use online tools to outline the story elements in their skits. The lesson also promotes listening skills and critical thinking as students view other groups' performances and determine the conflict and resolution of each.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 2 :
2 ) Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. [RL.3.2]

[ELA2015] (3) 3 :
3 ) Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. [RL.3.3]

[ELA2015] (3) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.3.10]

[ELA2015] (4) 11 :
11 ) Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. [RI.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 12 :
12 ) Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. [RI.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 13 :
13 ) Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a Grade 4 topic or subject area. [RI.4.4]

[ELA2015] (4) 17 :
17 ) Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text. [RI.4.8]

[ELA2015] (4) 19 :
19 ) By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the Grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RI.4.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.5.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.5.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.5.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.5.4c]

[ELA2015] (5) 23 :
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.5.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.5.2a]

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. [W.5.2b]

c. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially). [W.5.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.5.2d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. [W.5.2e]

[ELA2015] (5) 29 :
29 ) Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources. [W.5.8]

[ELA2015] (5) 30 :
30 ) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. [W.5.9]

a. Apply Grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]"). [W.5.9a]

b. Apply Grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., "Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point[s]"). [W.5.9b]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[ELA2015] (6) 42 :
42 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. [L.6.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 6)
Title: American Folklore: A Jigsaw Character Study
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/american-folklore-jigsaw-character-30524.html
Description:

Collaborative groups will read a variety of American tall tales, then report elements of their story to the whole class. Students add story information to a collaborative, whole-class character study matrix that summarizes all the stories. In a writing activity, students compare two characters of their choice. Support for English Language Learners (ELLs) is embedded in the guided collaborative process, while the content of the stories adds to all students' knowledge of American culture and history. The stories used in the lesson include well known and lesser-known diverse characters. The lesson process is applicable to any set of related texts.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 3 :
3 ) Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. [RL.3.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 11 :
11 ) Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. [RI.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 12 :
12 ) Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. [RI.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 13 :
13 ) Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a Grade 4 topic or subject area. [RI.4.4]

[ELA2015] (4) 15 :
15 ) Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided. [RI.4.6]

[ELA2015] (4) 17 :
17 ) Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text. [RI.4.8]

[ELA2015] (4) 19 :
19 ) By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the Grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RI.4.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.5.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.5.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.5.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.5.4c]

[ELA2015] (5) 23 :
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.5.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.5.2a]

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. [W.5.2b]

c. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially). [W.5.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.5.2d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. [W.5.2e]

[ELA2015] (5) 29 :
29 ) Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources. [W.5.8]

[ELA2015] (5) 30 :
30 ) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. [W.5.9]

a. Apply Grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., how characters interact]"). [W.5.9a]

b. Apply Grade 5 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., "Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point[s]"). [W.5.9b]

[ELA2015] (5) 31 :
31 ) Write routinely over extended time frames, including time for research, reflection, and revision, and shorter time frames such as a single sitting or a day or two for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. [W.5.10]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[ELA2015] (6) 42 :
42 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. [L.6.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 6)
Title: The Tale of Despereaux: Fact or Fiction?
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/tale-despereaux-fact-fiction-30561.html
Description:

In this lesson, after reading the book The Tale of Despereaux, students choose a section of the book and research medieval times to make comparisons between the events that occur in the book and what they learn about this time in history from other web and print sources. Students will then choose a project based on their learning style to showcase the information they learned about medieval times.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 11 :
11 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 12 :
12 ) Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RI.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 17 :
17 ) Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. [RI.6.7]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[ELA2015] (7) 10 :
10 ) Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.7.1]

[ELA2015] (7) 11 :
11 ) Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text. [RI.7.2]

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 7)
Title: I've Got It Covered! Creating Magazine Covers to Summarize Texts
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/covered-creating-magazine-covers-1092.html
Description:

Students can improve their comprehension of content area textbooks by summarizing chapters in the form of magazine covers. The lesson begins by asking students to examine a magazine and discuss the ways in which the magazine cover's headlines and graphics express the main ideas of its articles. They then review a chapter in a content area textbook and use an interactive tool to create a magazine cover that summarizes the textbook information. This process enables students to form connections and create visual representations to share information. Although the focus is on informational texts, this assignment could potentially be expanded to include other types of text as well.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[ELA2015] (6) 40 :
40 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 6 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.6.4]

a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.6.4a]

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., audience, auditory, audible). [L.6.4b]

c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. [L.6.4c]

d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). [L.6.4d]

[ELA2015] (6) 42 :
42 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. [L.6.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (6)
Title: Flip-a-Chip: Examining Affixes and Roots to Build Vocabulary
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/flip-chip-examining-affixes-253.html
Description:

The Flip-a-Chip activity turns ordinary poker chips into a teaching tool, showing students how different affixes and roots can be joined to make words and then placed into a context-rich paragraph. Each set of chips contains two-word roots and two affixes that can be combined into four different words. For example, the prefixes im- and sup- might be written on the two sides of one poker chip, and the roots pose and press on the other chip. The four possible words (impose, impress, suppose, suppress ) are inserted into four blanks in a paragraph according to context clues. After practicing with both real and "virtual" chips (in the Flip-a-Chip online interactive), students work in pairs to create their own set of chips and corresponding paragraph. They exchange their packets to see whether the context clues are strong enough to enable classmates to fill in the blanks correctly.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. [RL.3.1]

[ELA2015] (3) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.3.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.3.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.3.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.3.4c]

[ELA2015] (3) 23 :
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.3.2]

a. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.3.2a]

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details. [W.3.2b]

c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information. [W.3.2c]

d. Provide a concluding statement or section. [W.3.2d]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 6)
Title: Opening the Door for Reading: Sharing Favorite Texts to Build Community
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/opening-door-reading-sharing-852.html
Description:

Use literacy skills to make connections among those in your classroom with this lesson that focuses on building classroom community by sharing favorite texts with one another. In this lesson, the class explores environmental print then focuses specifically on a teacher-created display on a favorite book. After exploring the teacher's display, students write about their own favorite book, genre, or author. Students then select one of several options for making a display of their favorite book to share with the class. After creating their own presentations, students share them with the class and complete peer- or self-assessments. The lesson presents a fun way for teachers to share their love of literature with students and for the students to get to know their teachers as a reader.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 25 :
25 ) With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three Language standards in Grades K-6.) [W.6.5]

[ELA2015] (6) 30 :
30 ) Write routinely over extended time frames, including time for research, reflection, and revision, and shorter time frames such as a single sitting or a day or two for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. [W.6.10]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[ELA2015] (6) 40 :
40 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 6 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.6.4]

a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.6.4a]

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., audience, auditory, audible). [L.6.4b]

c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. [L.6.4c]

d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). [L.6.4d]

Subject: English Language Arts (6)
Title: Using Word Webs to Teach Synonyms for Commonly Used Words
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/using-word-webs-teach-282.html
Description:

"I feel good." "It was nice." "That was bad." Students respond to teachers' questions with these generic descriptions all the time, leaving teachers to dig deeper to figure out what students are really trying to say. Second-language learners also struggle to use descriptive words in written and oral language and tend to overuse common words, such as good, bad, and nice, due to their lack of knowledge of specific synonyms. In this multisession lesson, word webs are used to expose students to synonyms for common words, to help students choose synonyms that are appropriate for a given context, and to encourage students to use more descriptive words in their speech and writing. Student pairs then use words from the web in a skit they present to the class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 23 :
23 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.6.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.6.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.6.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. [W.6.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. [W.6.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.6.3e]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[ELA2015] (6) 35 :
35 ) Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information. [SL.6.5]

Subject: English Language Arts (6)
Title: 3-2-1 Vocabulary: Learning Filmmaking Vocabulary by Making Films
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/vocabulary-learning-filmmaking-vocabulary-30683.html?tab=1#tabs
Description:

Students are introduced to the vocabulary of film as they go through the process of creating a short original film. This unit provides instruction on key aspects of digital video filmmaking: plotting, script, storyboarding, camera work (shots, angles), and editing (transitions, title, credits, visual effects, sound effects, etc.). Once students are familiar with the techniques and terms introduced in this lesson, they can apply their new skills to bring other content areas to life through filmmaking. The activities involved in filmmaking can be particularly helpful to English language learners (ELLs) because the visual component helps ELL's consolidate their knowledge.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 17 :
17 ) Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. [RI.6.7]

[ELA2015] (6) 22 :
22 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. [W.6.2]

a. Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison or contrast, and cause and effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.6.2a]

b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. [W.6.2b]

c. Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. [W.6.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.6.2d]

e. Establish and maintain a formal style. [W.6.2e]

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the information or explanation presented. [W.6.2f]

[ELA2015] (6) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.6.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.6.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.6.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under discussion. [SL.6.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing. [SL.6.1d]

[ELA2015] (6) 40 :
40 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 6 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.6.4]

a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.6.4a]

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., audience, auditory, audible). [L.6.4b]

c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. [L.6.4c]

d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). [L.6.4d]

[ELA2015] (7) 21 :
21 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. [W.7.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison or contrast, and cause and effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.7.2a]

b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. [W.7.2b]

c. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. [W.7.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.7.2d]

e. Establish and maintain a formal style. [W.7.2e]

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. [W.7.2f]

[ELA2015] (7) 39 :
39 ) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on Grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. [L.7.4]

a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. [L.7.4a]

b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., belligerent, bellicose, rebel). [L.7.4b]

c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech. [L.7.4c]

d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary). [L.7.4d]

[ELA2015] (8) 21 :
21 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. [W.8.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.8.2a]

b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. [W.8.2b]

c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. [W.8.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.8.2d]

e. Establish and maintain a formal style. [W.8.2e]

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. [W.8.2f]

[ELA2015] (8) 26 :
26 ) Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. [W.8.7]

[ELA2015] (8) 27 :
27 ) Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. [W.8.8]

Subject: English Language Arts (6 - 8)
Title: ABC Bookmaking Builds Vocabulary in the Content Areas
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/bookmaking-builds-vocabulary-content-276.html
Description:

Students are engaged and motivated to build content-area vocabulary through the creation of ABC books. A small-group activity introduces a variety of ABC books, including books for older readers that use the letters of the alphabet as a starting point to present information about a featured subject. Students then decide on a style and structure for their own alphabet books and choose a word for each letter from content area textbooks, encyclopedias, reference books, or suggested websites. A storyboard is constructed including each of the 26 words, the context in which it will appear, and a quick sketch of the proposed illustration. Students' final ABC books are created using either the interactive Alphabet Organizer or PowerPoint.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 9

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