ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (2) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (2) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill.


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (11) 1 :
1 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RL.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (11) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (11) 25 :
25 ) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. [W.11-12.7]

[ELA2015] (11) 29 :
29 ) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. [SL.11-12.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. [SL.11-12.1a]

b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed. [SL.11-12.1b]

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives. [SL.11-12.1c]

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task. [SL.11-12.1d]

[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
[SS2010] US11 (11) 10 :
10 ) Describe the impact of World War II on the lives of American citizens, including wartime economic measures, population shifts, growth in the middle class, growth of industrialization, advancements in science and technology, increased wealth in the African-American community, racial and ethnic tensions, Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (G. I. Bill of Rights), and desegregation of the military. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Describing Alabama's participation in World War II, including the role of the Tuskegee Airmen, the Aliceville Prisoner of War (POW) camp, growth of the Port of Mobile, production of Birmingham steel, and the establishment of military bases (Alabama)
Subject: English Language Arts (11), or Social Studies (11)
Title: "Cheer, Cheer, for the 'Red, White, and Blue!'" University and High School Students' Contributions and Participation during the World Wars
Description: Students will examine and evaluate both college and high school students' support of and involvement in the World Wars. Students will research both photographic and textual resources in order to produce factual information about how students reacted to World Wars 1 and 2. This lesson will culminate in a student-driven Socratic Seminar style discussion which will allow the students to verbally articulate their findings from the resources provided. This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (11) 9 :
9 ) By the end of Grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 11-College and Career Readiness (CCR) text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.11-12.10]

[ELA2015] (11) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
[SS2010] US11 (11) 3 :
3 ) Explain the United States' changing role in the early twentieth century as a world power. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Describing causes of the Spanish-American War, including yellow journalism, the sinking of the Battleship USS Maine, and economic interests in Cuba
•  Identifying the role of the Rough Riders on the iconic status of President Theodore Roosevelt
•  Describing consequences of the Spanish-American War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1898, insurgency in the Philippines, and territorial expansion in the Pacific and Caribbean
•  Analyzing the involvement of the United States in the Hawaiian Islands for economic and imperialistic interests
•  Appraising Alabama's contributions to the United States between Reconstruction and World War I, including those of William Crawford Gorgas, Joseph Wheeler, and John Tyler Morgan (Alabama)
•  Evaluating the role of the Open Door policy and the Roosevelt Corollary on America's expanding economic and geographic interests
•  Comparing the executive leadership represented by William Howard Taft's Dollar Diplomacy, Theodore Roosevelt's Big Stick Diplomacy, and Woodrow Wilson's Moral Diplomacy
[ELA2015] (11) 24 :
24 ) Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information. [W.11-12.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (11), or Social Studies (11)
Title: Not so Fast, Mr. President!: Examining American Opposition to Involvement in World War I
Description: In this lesson, students will be examining primary sources pertaining to differing viewpoints of America's involvement in World War I. The students will annotate the documents, looking for main ideas and supporting details. The students will then form graphic organizers separating two opposing viewpoints. Finally, students will write a group expository essay using the data from the graphic organizer.  This lesson was created as part of the Alabama Bicentennial Commission’s Curriculum Development Project.


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (7) 10 :
10 ) Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.7.1]

[ELA2015] (7) 25 :
25 ) Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources. [W.7.6]

[ELA2015] (8) 10 :
10 ) Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.8.1]

[ELA2015] (9) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.9-10.1]

[ELA2015] (10) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.9-10.1]

[ELA2015] (11) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (12) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[DLIT] (7) 22 :
16) Construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Examples: Design a multi-media children's e-book with an appropriate readability level.

[DLIT] (7) 23 :
17) Publish content to be available for external feedback.

[DLIT] (8) 23 :
17) Communicate and publish individually or collaboratively to persuade peers, experts, or community about issues and problems.

[HE1] (8) 13 :
13 ) Explain why mixing drugs can cause injury, illness, and death.

[HE1] (9-12) 15 :
15 ) Identify effects on health and behavior regarding the use of chemical substances, including prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

[HE1] (7) 7 :
7 ) Demonstrate decision-making skills as they relate to situations involving health risks.

Examples: responding appropriately to sexual harassment, avoiding physical conflict, objecting to verbal and physical bullying, avoiding inappropriate electronic communication

Subject: English Language Arts (7 - 12), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (7 - 8), Health (7 - 12)
Title: Drugs and the Teen Brain (HyperDoc - Website Creation)
Description: The students will synthesize information to learn how their brain develops and why using drugs and alcohol is especially risky for teens. Students will use this information to design, create, and publish a Google Site that explains why teens are more at risk for becoming addicted to drugs than adults. This activity was created as a result of the ALEX Resource Development Summit.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (11) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (11) 15 :
15 ) Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text. [RI.11-12.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (11)
Title: Flipping Out Over Cartoons: Rhetorical Analysis of Editorial Cartoons
Description: In this learning activity, students will focus on a rhetorical analysis of visual texts to determine an author's purpose and message. First, students will view a video on how to analyze political or editorial cartoons. By identifying and analyzing labels, symbols, exaggeration, irony, analogy, and argument, students will be able to infer the artist's/author's intended message of the editorial cartoon. Then, students will practice analyzing other cartoons with the same process utilizing the tech tool Flipgrid. (from Common Sense Education: Flipgrid is a website that allows teachers to create "grids" of short discussion-style questions that students respond to through recorded videos. Each grid is effectively a message board where teachers can pose a question and their students can post 90-second video responses that appear in a tiled "grid" display.)  This activity results from the ALEX Resource Gap Project.


ALEX Learning Activities: 2

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