ALEX Resources

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Lesson Plans (1) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (2)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (12) 6 :
6 ) Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement). [RL.11-12.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (12)
Title: Now That's Ironic
Description:

Students learn how irony, satire and sarcasm indirectly stated in a text, help to develop an author's tone.

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (12) 6 :
6 ) Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement). [RL.11-12.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (12)
Title: Seussical Satire
Description:

This learning activity uses a Dr. Seuss video of "The Star-Belly Sneetches", a satire of discrimination between race and culture. In can serve as an eye-opening experience for students.




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (9) 5 :
5 ) Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. [RL.9-10.5]

[ELA2015] (9) 24 :
24 ) Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-9.) [W.9-10.5]

[ELA2015] (10) 5 :
5 ) Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. [RL.9-10.5]

[ELA2015] (10) 9 :
9 ) By the end of Grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the Grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.9-10.10]

[ELA2015] (10) 25 :
25 ) Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-10.) [W.9-10.5]

[ELA2015] (11) 23 :
23 ) Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of the first three standards in the Language strand in Grades K-11.) [W.11-12.5]

[ELA2015] (12) 1 :
1 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RL.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (12) 3 :
3 ) Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). [RL.11-12.3]

[ELA2015] (12) 6 :
6 ) Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement). [RL.11-12.6]

[ELA2015] (12) 9 :
9 ) By the end of Grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the Grades 11-College and Career Readiness (CCR) text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.11-12.10]

Subject: English Language Arts (9 - 12)
Title: Exploring Irony in the Conclusion of "All Quiet on the Western Front"
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/exploring-irony-conclusion-quiet-994.html
Description:

All Quiet on the Western Front ends with a startling and ironic conclusion. Following a chapter that begins with talk of the anticipated armistice, the novel's final short paragraphs unemotionally state that Paul, the protagonist, is killed on a day army reports described as "all quiet on the western front." This ending introduces students to situational irony. After discussing the definition and several examples of situational irony, students explore the novel's concluding passage. Students next choose a possible alternate ending for the book that could still be an example of situational irony. They then retitle the book and rewrite its ending, maintaining the original ironic tone and weaving their new title into the ending as Remarque does. Finally, students design new, symbolic covers for the book, which feature their new titles.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (9) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.9-10.2]

[ELA2015] (9) 9 :
9 ) By the end of Grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.9-10.10]

[ELA2015] (10) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.9-10.2]

[ELA2015] (12) 6 :
6 ) Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement). [RL.11-12.6]

[ELA2015] (12) 9 :
9 ) By the end of Grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the Grades 11-College and Career Readiness (CCR) text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.11-12.10]

Subject: English Language Arts (9 - 12)
Title: A 'Brief, Urgent Message': Theme in Slaughterhouse-Five
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/brief-urgent-message-theme-1164.html?tab=1#tabs
Description:

In Slaughterhouse-Five, author Kurt Vonnegut describes Tralfamadorian literature as "brief, urgent message[s]—describing a situation, a scene"; when seen all at once, they produce an image of life that is beautiful and surprising and deep" (111-112). Students use this literary perspective to analyze passages from Slaughterhouse-Five and then apply that perspective by creating a compilation album, CD cover, and liner notes that demonstrate their interpretation, understanding, and evaluation of the themes and ideas in the novel.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 2

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