ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (4) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Unit Plans (1)  Classroom Resources (6)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] GHS (3) 3 :
3 ) Describe ways the environment is affected by humans in Alabama and the world. (Alabama)

Examples: crop rotation, oil spills, landfills, clearing of forests, replacement of cleared lands, restocking of fish in waterways

•  Using vocabulary associated with human influence on the environment, including irrigation, aeration, urbanization, reforestation, erosion, and migration
[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 1 :
1 ) Locate on a map physical features that impacted the exploration and settlement of the Americas, including ocean currents, prevailing winds, large forests, major rivers, and significant mountain ranges.

•  Locating on a map states and capitals east of the Mississippi River
•  Identifying natural harbors in North America
Examples: Mobile, Boston, New York, New Orleans, Savannah (Alabama)

[SS2010] USS5 (5) 2 :
2 ) Identify causes and effects of early migration and settlement of North America.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 1 :
1) Elaborate on an individual or prompted imaginative idea.

Examples: Create an imaginative mask showing his/her personality.
Look at masks from different cultures such as Chinese, African and Native American.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 2 :
2) Demonstrate skills using available resources, tools, and technologies to investigate personal ideas through the art-making process.

Examples: Choose from a variety of resources and materials to create a work of art.
Use books Imagine That by Joyce Raymond or Dinner at Magritte's by Michael Garland.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 4 :
4) Demonstrate an understanding of the safe and proficient use of materials, tools, equipment, and studio space.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 10 :
10) Speculate about processes and purposes an artist used to create a work of art.

Example: Observe and compare similar themes in artwork from historical and contemporary eras.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 14 :
14) Create works of art based on observations of surroundings.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 4 :
4) When making works of art, utilize and care for materials, tools, and equipment in a manner that prevents danger to oneself and others.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 5 :
5) Document, describe, and create real or imagined constructed environments.

Example: Design a futuristic art room, town, or planet.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 15 :
15) Through observation, infer information about time, place, and culture in which a work of art was created.

Example: Look at the statue of Vulcan in Birmingham and talk about its relationship to history of the city.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 2 :
2) Demonstrate the methods of the art-making process, including brainstorming, sketching, reflecting, and refining, to create a work of art/design.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 4 :
4) Demonstrate proper care and use of materials, tools, and equipment while creating art.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 10 :
10) Compare one's interpretation of a work of art with the interpretation of others.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 13 :
13) Recognize differences in criteria used to evaluate works of art depending on styles, genres, and media as well as historical and cultural contexts.

Subject: Arts Education (3 - 5), or Social Studies (3 - 5)
Title: Alabama's Pine Barren
Description:

Students will read a description of the pine barrens by Basil Hall and analyze the text by using the 3-2-1 strategy. Students will discuss the life and work of Basil Hall, including his travels and journaling in North America. They will observe how a camera lucida functions and debate whether using a camera lucida is "cheating" in art. Next, students will venture outside to create a sketch of their environment while appropriately utilizing materials. They will compare and contrast their products to the sketches of Basil Hall and critique each other's work. 

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. [RL.3.1]

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[SS2010] ALA (4) 3 :
3 ) Explain the social, political, and economic impact of the War of 1812, including battles and significant leaders of the Creek War, on Alabama.

Examples: social—adoption of European culture by American Indians, opening of Alabama land for settlement

political—forced relocation of American Indians, labeling of Andrew Jackson as a hero and propelling him toward Presidency

economic—acquisition of tribal land in Alabama by the United States

•  Explaining the impact of the Trail of Tears on Alabama American Indians' lives, rights, and territories
Subject: English Language Arts (3), or Social Studies (3 - 4)
Title: The Negotiators - Land Of No Return
Description:

The lesson content is connected to Alabama Course of Study SS2010 (4) which will explain why significant leaders of the Creek War disrupted the Alabama Creek Indian Headsmen and the government. The disruption would be solved through negotiation.  The negotiating Creek Indians did not obtain full restoration of their land, however, they did accept a compromise.

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
Subject: Social Studies (3)
Title: Reducing the Impact of a Flood
Description:

Students will interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents and photographs about dam designs. Students will gain skills necessary for researching by locating credible and original sources, determining if the sources are primary or secondary. Students will use technology to create a presentation, highlighting primary and secondary sources.

This unit was created as part of the ALEX Interdisciplinary Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 12 :
12 ) Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause and effect. [RI.3.3]

[ELA2015] (3) 6 :
6 ) Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. [RL.3.6]

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
Subject: English Language Arts (3), or Social Studies (3)
Title: Pros and Cons - Picture Perfect Capitol for Alabama
Description:

Pictures of Alabama State Capitols are provided in this lesson to give students the opportunity to research information that could help them to give their point of view. It will be up to the students to provide further information about the pictures. This will start a conversation about the best location for a capital city and its capitol building.

This lesson was created as part of the Alabama Bicentennial Commission’s Curriculum Development Project.




ALEX Unit Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2019] (3) 17 :
17. Measure lengths using rulers marked with halves and fourths of an inch to generate data and create a line plot marked off in appropriate units to display the data.
[MA2019] (3) 16 :
16. For a given or collected set of data, create a scaled (one-to-many) picture graph and scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories.

a. Determine a simple probability from a context that includes a picture.

b. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled graphs.
[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[ELA2015] (3) 27 :
27 ) With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others. [W.3.6]

[ELA2015] (3) 12 :
12 ) Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause and effect. [RI.3.3]

[SC2015] (3) 15 :
15 ) Evaluate a design solution (e.g., flood barriers, wind resistant roofs, lightning rods) that reduces the impact of a weather-related hazard.*


Title: Reducing the Impact of a Flood
Unit Plan Overview: In relation to science, students will evaluate a dam design that reduces the impacts of a flood. Students will describe the relationship between scientific ideas or concepts using language that pertains to cause and effect in reference to dam design. Using technology to produce and publish writing, students will interact and collaborate with others on their dam design. In math, students will draw a scaled bar graph to represent dam and flood data over time and then use rulers marked with halves and fourths of an inch to measure lengths and construct their own dam. Students will also interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents and photographs about dam designs. This unit was created as a part of the ALEX Interdisciplinary Resource Development Summit.



Go To Top of page
ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[SS2010] ALA (4) 6 :
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
Subject: Social Studies (3 - 4)
Title: Using Rice Plantation Tools
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/slavelife/slave_ricetools.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students analyze images of tools used on rice plantations to determine each tool's purpose.  Students will study these objects to learn about slavery and the lives of the slaves who worked on rice plantations. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 3)
Title: Conducting a Genealogical Study
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/women/women_genealogy.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students learn about the methods and tools necessary to conduct a genealogical interview to research women's history in their family.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[SS2010] ALA (4) 6 :
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Darkroom Detective
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/sodhouse/sodhouse_detective.pdf
Description:

In this activity, students learn about life in a sod house by looking at photographs (primary sources) and answering questions.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[SS2010] ALA (4) 6 :
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Document Detective
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/slavelife/slave_detective.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students analyze newspaper advertisements (primary source) regarding runaway slaves from the Charleston Mercury, a South Carolina newspaper, to learn about the Underground Railroad.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (1) 34 :
34 ) Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly. [SL.1.4]

[ELA2015] (3) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.3.3]

a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.3.3a]

b. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations. [W.3.3b]

c. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order. [W.3.3c]

d. Provide a sense of closure. [W.3.3d]

[SS2010] LWT1 (1) 5 :
5 ) Identify historical events and celebrations within the local community and throughout Alabama. (Alabama)

Examples: Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Black History Month (Alabama)

•  Differentiating between fact and fiction when sharing stories or retelling events using primary and secondary sources
Example: fictional version of Pocahontas compared to an authentic historical account

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
Subject: English Language Arts (1 - 3), Social Studies (1 - 3)
Title: The Life and Music of Celia Cruz
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/celiacruz/printable/downloads/PDF/Autobiography%20though%20Objects.Kto4.pdf
Description:

In this lesson plan, students will analyze primary sources relating to Celia Cruz. Then, students will tell their own story using objects that are meaningful to them. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 7 :
7 ) Explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting). [RL.3.7]

[ELA2015] (5) 12 :
12 ) Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text. [RI.5.3]

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 5), Social Studies (3 - 5)
Title: Find Grace's Family
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/lincoln/find_family.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students will analyze a famous letter written by Grace Badell to President Abraham Lincoln. Using hints about Grace's family from the letter, students will draw pictures of her family.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 6

Go To Top of page