ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (3) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (2)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.4.3]

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.4.3a]

b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. [W.4.3b]

c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. [W.4.3c]

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. [W.4.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.4.3e]

[SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
[DLIT] (4) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), or English Language Arts (4), or Social Studies (4)
Title: What is the Price of Land?
Description:

In this lesson, students will define conflict as it relates to Native American land conflict during the early nineteenth century.  Students will compare Native Americans' and settlers' perspectives on land.  Students will write a narrative writing as a Creek Chief watching the settlers move into their territory, focusing on how this makes them feel and how these events will change the lives of his/her people. 

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] GHS (3) 3 :
3 ) Describe ways the environment is affected by humans in Alabama and the world. (Alabama)

Examples: crop rotation, oil spills, landfills, clearing of forests, replacement of cleared lands, restocking of fish in waterways

•  Using vocabulary associated with human influence on the environment, including irrigation, aeration, urbanization, reforestation, erosion, and migration
[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 1 :
1 ) Locate on a map physical features that impacted the exploration and settlement of the Americas, including ocean currents, prevailing winds, large forests, major rivers, and significant mountain ranges.

•  Locating on a map states and capitals east of the Mississippi River
•  Identifying natural harbors in North America
Examples: Mobile, Boston, New York, New Orleans, Savannah (Alabama)

[SS2010] USS5 (5) 2 :
2 ) Identify causes and effects of early migration and settlement of North America.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 1 :
1) Elaborate on an individual or prompted imaginative idea.

Examples: Create an imaginative mask showing his/her personality.
Look at masks from different cultures such as Chinese, African and Native American.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 2 :
2) Demonstrate skills using available resources, tools, and technologies to investigate personal ideas through the art-making process.

Examples: Choose from a variety of resources and materials to create a work of art.
Use books Imagine That by Joyce Raymond or Dinner at Magritte's by Michael Garland.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 4 :
4) Demonstrate an understanding of the safe and proficient use of materials, tools, equipment, and studio space.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 10 :
10) Speculate about processes and purposes an artist used to create a work of art.

Example: Observe and compare similar themes in artwork from historical and contemporary eras.

[ARTS] VISA (3) 14 :
14) Create works of art based on observations of surroundings.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 4 :
4) When making works of art, utilize and care for materials, tools, and equipment in a manner that prevents danger to oneself and others.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 5 :
5) Document, describe, and create real or imagined constructed environments.

Example: Design a futuristic art room, town, or planet.

[ARTS] VISA (4) 15 :
15) Through observation, infer information about time, place, and culture in which a work of art was created.

Example: Look at the statue of Vulcan in Birmingham and talk about its relationship to history of the city.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 2 :
2) Demonstrate the methods of the art-making process, including brainstorming, sketching, reflecting, and refining, to create a work of art/design.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 4 :
4) Demonstrate proper care and use of materials, tools, and equipment while creating art.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 10 :
10) Compare one's interpretation of a work of art with the interpretation of others.

[ARTS] VISA (5) 13 :
13) Recognize differences in criteria used to evaluate works of art depending on styles, genres, and media as well as historical and cultural contexts.

Subject: Arts Education (3 - 5), or Social Studies (3 - 5)
Title: Alabama's Pine Barren
Description:

Students will read a description of the pine barrens by Basil Hall and analyze the text by using the 3-2-1 strategy. Students will discuss the life and work of Basil Hall, including his travels and journaling in North America. They will observe how a camera lucida functions and debate whether using a camera lucida is "cheating" in art. Next, students will venture outside to create a sketch of their environment while appropriately utilizing materials. They will compare and contrast their products to the sketches of Basil Hall and critique each other's work. 

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
[ELA2015] (4) 12 :
12 ) Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. [RI.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 16 :
16 ) Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. [RI.4.7]

[ELA2015] (4) 18 :
18 ) Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably. [RI.4.9]

[ELA2015] (4) 32 :
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.4.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.4.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.4.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others. [SL.4.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. [SL.4.1d]

[ELA2015] (4) 10 :
10 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RI.4.1]

Subject: English Language Arts (4), or Social Studies (4)
Title: Hernando de Soto in Alabama
Description:

Students will use primary sources to gain information about Hernando de Soto, his route, and his interactions with Native Americans in Alabama. Students will read two articles in order to identify information about Hernando de Soto and his journey through Alabama. Students will also learn about the impact of European Exploration on the Native Americans who were in Alabama in the 1500s. 

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 4 :
4 ) Determine the economic and cultural impact of European exploration during the Age of Discovery upon European society and American Indians.

•  Identifying significant early European patrons, explorers, and their countries of origin, including early settlements in the New World
Examples: patrons—King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella

explorers—Christopher Columbus

early settlements—St. Augustine, Quebec, Jamestown

•  Tracing the development and impact of the Columbian Exchange
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 5 :
5 ) Explain the early colonization of North America and reasons for settlement in the Northern, Middle, and Southern colonies, including geographic features, landforms, and differences in climate among the colonies.

•  Recognizing how colonial development was influenced by the desire for religious freedom
Example: development in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, and Maryland colonies

•  Identifying influential leaders in colonial society
•  Describing emerging colonial government
Examples: Mayflower Compact, representative government, town meetings, rule of law

Subject: Social Studies (4 - 5)
Title: How It All Started!
Description:

This interactive tool provides videos of the pilgrims embarking on their first journey.  Students can explore the experiences and historical significance of the pilgrim's voyage, settlement, and first harvest celebration.




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Clip 3: Old Mobile
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/b02f2cea-6ac0-4afb-a57a-636b6f16bf86/old-mobile/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, the kids continue their adventure in Old Mobile, a settlement for French colonists in the early 1700s. They view artifacts from these early settlers at the University of South Alabama Archaeology Museum.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 3 :
3 ) Use various primary sources, including calendars and timelines, for reconstructing the past.

Examples: historical letters, stories, interviews with elders, photographs, maps, artifacts

[SS2010] ALA (4) 1 :
1 ) Compare historical and current economic, political, and geographic information about Alabama on thematic maps, including weather and climate, physical-relief, waterway, transportation, political, economic development, land-use, and population maps.

•  Describing types of migrations as they affect the environment, agriculture, economic development, and population changes in Alabama
[SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
[SS2010] ALA (4) 3 :
3 ) Explain the social, political, and economic impact of the War of 1812, including battles and significant leaders of the Creek War, on Alabama.

Examples: social—adoption of European culture by American Indians, opening of Alabama land for settlement

political—forced relocation of American Indians, labeling of Andrew Jackson as a hero and propelling him toward Presidency

economic—acquisition of tribal land in Alabama by the United States

•  Explaining the impact of the Trail of Tears on Alabama American Indians' lives, rights, and territories
[SS2010] ALA (4) 5 :
5 ) Describe Alabama's entry into statehood and establishment of its three branches of government and the constitutions.

•  Explaining political and geographic reasons for changes in location of Alabama's state capital
•  Recognizing roles of prominent political leaders during early statehood in Alabama, including William Wyatt Bibb, Thomas Bibb, Israel Pickens, William Rufus King, and John W. Walker
Subject: Social Studies (2 - 4)
Title: Archaeology Adventures: Early Alabama History (Full Episode)
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/2ea3cc35-603f-46a1-9e1c-b493bba82503/archaeology-adventures-early-alabama-history/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, three young kids venture outside their 2-D animated world to learn about early Alabama history for their upcoming school report. Aided by their hyper-intelligent robotic friend Roto and a magical portal, they visit some of Alabama’s historic sites to learn about Native American societies, early settlers, and the beginning of Alabama’s statehood. With the help of local archaeologists and historians, they just might make it back home in time to get to school and turn in their report!



ALEX Classroom Resources: 2

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