ALEX Resources

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Learning Activities (5) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (18)


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 10 :
10 ) Describe political, social, and economic events between 1803 and 1860 that led to the expansion of the territory of the United States, including the War of 1812, the Indian Removal Act, the Texas-Mexican War, the Mexican-American War, and the Gold Rush of 1849.

•  Analyzing the role of the Louisiana Purchase and explorations of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark for their impact on Westward Expansion
•  Explaining the purpose of the Monroe Doctrine
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the expansion movement in the United States, including the Battle of Horseshoe Bend and the Trail of Tears (Alabama)
•  Identifying the impact of technological developments on United States' expansion
Examples: steamboat, steam locomotive, telegraph, barbed wire

[SS2010] USS5 (5) 1 :
1 ) Locate on a map physical features that impacted the exploration and settlement of the Americas, including ocean currents, prevailing winds, large forests, major rivers, and significant mountain ranges.

•  Locating on a map states and capitals east of the Mississippi River
•  Identifying natural harbors in North America
Examples: Mobile, Boston, New York, New Orleans, Savannah (Alabama)

[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: Social Studies (5)
Title: Celebrating Alabama's Bicentennial: A Presentation of Alabama History
Description:

Students in each Grade 5 class will work in collaboration to create a group Google Slides presentation celebrating the Alabama Bicentennial (or Alabama History.) Each student pair will research a different topic to find information to create two or three slides as part of the group slideshow. The finished class Google Slides show will be presented, with each student pair reading their own slides. (See digital resource for suggested topic list drawn from course standards.) 

This activity was created as a result of the ALEX Learning Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[ELA2015] (5) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.5.3]

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.5.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. [W.5.3b]

c. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events. [W.5.3c]

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. [W.5.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.5.3e]

Subject: Social Studies (5), English Language Arts (5)
Title: Journey to Freedom: Underground Railroad
Description:

This learning activity can be used during or after a lesson or unit on the Underground Railroad and/or the Civil War. The Underground Railroad is a “choose your own” learning experience allowing students to make a series of choices that affect their journey along the Underground Railroad. Presented from a first-person perspective, the learning experience immerses students in the action as they escape from a southern plantation and head north toward freedom. Along the route, students make key decisions that will lead them to one of several possible outcomes.

This activity was created as a result of the ALEX Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[ARTS] MUS (5) 10 :
10) Explain how context (such as social, cultural, and historical) informs performances.

Subject: Social Studies (5), Arts Education (5)
Title: Civil War Songs Performance
Description:

In this activity, students will study the music of the Civil War to identify social, economic, and political conditions that affected the citizens of the United states during the Civil War. Students will explain how a performer performs a piece of music differently when he/she knows the social, cultural, or historical background of the piece.

This activity was created as a result of the Arts COS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 12 :
12 ) Describe the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin and the role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimké, Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing the rise of religious movements in opposition to slavery, including objections of the Quakers
•  Explaining the importance of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 that banned slavery in new states north of the Ohio River
•  Describing the rise of the Underground Railroad and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman and the impact of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, on the abolitionist movement
[SS2010] US10 (10) 13 :
13 ) Summarize major legislation and court decisions from 1800 to 1861 that led to increasing sectionalism, including the Missouri Compromise of 1820, the Compromise of 1850, the Fugitive Slave Acts, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott decision. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing Alabama's role in the developing sectionalism of the United States from 1819 to 1861, including participation in slavery, secession, the Indian War, and reliance on cotton (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Westward Expansion from 1803 to 1861 to determine its effect on sectionalism, including the Louisiana Purchase, Texas Annexation, and the Mexican Cession
•  Describing tariff debates and the nullification crisis between 1800 and 1861
•  Analyzing the formation of the Republican Party for its impact on the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 7 :
7 ) Describe causes, courses, and consequences of United States' expansionism prior to the Civil War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1783, the Northwest Ordinance of 1785, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Louisiana Purchase, the Indian Removal Act, the Trail of Tears, Manifest Destiny, the Mexican War and Cession, Texas Independence, the acquisition of Oregon, the California Gold Rush, and the Western Trails. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: Causes of the Civil War
Description:

The Xtranormal video depicts a discussion about the causes of the U.S. Civil War between Barack Obama and Abraham Lincoln. Both presidents are represented by cartoon avatars that resemble each president. **Because the video is from YouTube, instructions for how to address potential school site Internet blockages are listed in the "Advanced Preparation" section of this page.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 12 :
12 ) Describe the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin and the role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimké, Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing the rise of religious movements in opposition to slavery, including objections of the Quakers
•  Explaining the importance of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 that banned slavery in new states north of the Ohio River
•  Describing the rise of the Underground Railroad and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman and the impact of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, on the abolitionist movement
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: Flight to Freedom: the Underground Railroad
Description:

Mission US 2: Flight to Freedom provides an interactive role-playing game that is available for streaming or download. The player assumes the role of a slave and journeys to freedom via the Underground Railroad. The player makes choices, has conversations with characters, and learns about life on a Southern plantation and the struggle for the  freedom of slaves.




ALEX Learning Activities: 5

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: Social Studies (5)
Title: Life During Civil War
URL: https://admin.flipgrid.com/manage/discovery/details/51464
Description:

Students pretend they are reporters from Alabama. They will choose a survivor of the Civil War to interview - a Confederate soldier, a Union soldier, a politician, a civilian (non-soldier), or a woman. Students will create a fictional person to interview, but their answers must be based on historical facts. Students will prepare at least three questions for this person with a focus on their experiences during the war. Edit the video to go between the student as the reporter asking the questions and the student as the interviewed person. Bonus challenge: add costumes/props! 

A YouTube video is attached in the Flipgrid for an additional resource on the Civil War.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: Social Studies (5)
Title: Robert E. Lee Refuses Command of the Union Army
URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeGBpTFZhh4
Description:

Colonel Robert E. Lee is offered the opportunity to lead the Union army and the position of Major General. He respectfully declines because his home, Virginia, is considering secession from the Union, and he feels he has no greater duty than to serve his home.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: Social Studies (5)
Title: 12 Years a Slave Cotton Field Song
URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcJ6Wxdcj-E
Description:
Slaves work furiously in a field to supply the raw material for cotton processing. This clip can be used when teaching about slavery.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: Social Studies (5)
Title: Battle of Perryville: The Civil War Era
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/civera.arts.battperry/the-civil-war-era-battle-of-perryville/
Description:

This segment tells the story of the Battle of Perryville, which took place in Boyle County, KY, in October 1862. Historian Kent Masterson Brown discusses the importance of the Battle of Perryville for the course of the Civil War. It was crucial because the Union Army successfully drove the Confederate Army from Kentucky and ended its attempt to recapture the state.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: Lincoln’s Assassination | Lincoln:
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ket-lincoln-history-19/lincolns-assassination/
Description:

Many Kentuckians turn against the war when Lincoln enlists black soldiers. There is also anger toward Lincoln because of the political and economic conditions. On April 14, 1865, Lincoln is assassinated. 

This resource is part of the KET Lincoln: "I, Too, Am a Kentuckian." collection.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 9 :
9 ) Analyze political and economic issues facing Alabama during Reconstruction for their impact on various social groups.

Examples: political—military rule, presence of Freedmen's Bureau, Alabama's readmittance to the Union

economic—sharecropping, tenant farming, scarcity of goods and money

•  Interpreting the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution of the United States
•  Identifying African Americans who had an impact on Alabama during Reconstruction in Alabama
•  Identifying major political parties in Alabama during Reconstruction
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 12 :
12 ) Summarize successes and failures of the Reconstruction Era.

•  Evaluating the extension of citizenship rights to African Americans included in the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution of the United States
•  Analyzing the impact of Reconstruction for its effect on education and social institutions in the United States
Examples: Horace Mann and education reform, Freedmen's Bureau, establishment of segregated schools, African-American churches

•  Explaining the black codes and the Jim Crow laws
•  Describing post-Civil War land distribution, including tenant farming and sharecropping
Subject: Social Studies (4 - 5)
Title: Emancipation Proclamation
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/emancipation-proclamation-civics-101/video-civics-101/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, students learn the Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863. It declared “that all persons held as slaves” within the rebellious states “are, and henceforward shall be free.” It only applied to states that had seceded from the Union, exempting parts of the Confederacy.

More About This Resource:

With the Emancipation Proclamation, the aim of the war changed to include the freeing of slaves in addition to preserving the Union. Although the Proclamation initially freed only the slaves in the rebellious states, by the end of the war the Proclamation had influenced and prepared citizens to advocate and accept abolition for all slaves in both the North and South. The 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery in the United States, was passed on December 6th, 1865.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. [RL.3.1]

[ELA2015] (3) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.3.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.3.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.3.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.3.4c]

[ELA2015] (3) 28 :
28 ) Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. [W.3.7]

[ELA2015] (3) 29 :
29 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. [W.3.8]

[ELA2015] (3) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 3 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.3.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.3.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.3.1b]

c. Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others. [SL.3.1c]

d. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. [SL.3.1d]

[ELA2015] (3) 34 :
34 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.3.4]

[ELA2015] (4) 12 :
12 ) Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. [RI.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.4.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.4.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.4.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.4.4c]

[ELA2015] (4) 28 :
28 ) Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. [W.4.7]

[ELA2015] (5) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.5.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 32 :
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.5.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.5.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.5.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. [SL.5.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions. [SL.5.1d]

[SS2010] ALA (4) 14 :
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 5)
Title: Storytelling in the Social Studies Classroom
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/storytelling-social-studies-classroom-928.html
Description:

In this unit, students tell their own stories and explore the stories of other Americans. Hearing and telling these stories helps students realize that social studies is not simply the study of history, but an exploration of real people and their lives. Students begin by telling stories about their personal experiences. They then explore the character traits that promote democratic ideals and tell stories about family members who exemplify these traits. Finally, they conduct research and share stories about famous Americans. Practiced skills include reading, researching, visually representing, writing, and presenting.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (5) 11 :
11 ) Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text. [RI.5.2]

[ELA2015] (5) 17 :
17 ) Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s). [RI.5.8]

[ELA2015] (5) 23 :
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.5.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.5.2a]

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. [W.5.2b]

c. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially). [W.5.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.5.2d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. [W.5.2e]

[ELA2015] (5) 32 :
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.5.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.5.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.5.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. [SL.5.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions. [SL.5.1d]

[ELA2015] (6) 11 :
11 ) Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.6.1]

[ELA2015] (6) 12 :
12 ) Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments. [RI.6.2]

[ELA2015] (6) 22 :
22 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. [W.6.2]

a. Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison or contrast, and cause and effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.6.2a]

b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. [W.6.2b]

c. Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. [W.6.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.6.2d]

e. Establish and maintain a formal style. [W.6.2e]

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the information or explanation presented. [W.6.2f]

[ELA2015] (6) 42 :
42 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. [L.6.6]

[ELA2015] (7) 10 :
10 ) Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.7.1]

[ELA2015] (7) 21 :
21 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. [W.7.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison or contrast, and cause and effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.7.2a]

b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. [W.7.2b]

c. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. [W.7.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.7.2d]

e. Establish and maintain a formal style. [W.7.2e]

f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. [W.7.2f]

[ELA2015] (7) 30 :
30 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.7.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion. [SL.7.1a]

b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed. [SL.7.1b]

c. Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others' questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed. [SL.7.1c]

d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views. [SL.7.1d]

[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: English Language Arts (5 - 7), Social Studies (5)
Title: Strategic Reading and Writing: Summarizing Antislavery Biographies
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/strategic-reading-writing-summarizing-1017.html
Description:

Summarization is an essential comprehension skill to determine the importance of information when reading. In this lesson, students practice writing effective summaries using biographies. Students read selections from Enemies of Slavery by David Adler. They read about a specific person and then join a group of students who read about other people to learn about other biographies. Afterward, students use the Bio-Cube tool to record information about their assigned person and then display them in an Enemies of Slavery mobile.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. [RL.3.1]

[ELA2015] (3) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.3.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.3.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.3.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.3.4c]

[ELA2015] (3) 28 :
28 ) Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. [W.3.7]

[ELA2015] (3) 29 :
29 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. [W.3.8]

[ELA2015] (3) 31 :
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 3 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.3.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.3.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.3.1b]

c. Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others. [SL.3.1c]

d. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. [SL.3.1d]

[ELA2015] (3) 34 :
34 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.3.4]

[ELA2015] (4) 12 :
12 ) Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. [RI.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.4.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.4.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.4.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.4.4c]

[ELA2015] (4) 28 :
28 ) Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. [W.4.7]

[ELA2015] (5) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the Grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RL.5.10]

[ELA2015] (5) 32 :
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.5.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.5.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.5.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. [SL.5.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions. [SL.5.1d]

[SS2010] ALA (4) 14 :
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: Social Studies (4 - 5)
Title: Storytelling in the Social Studies Classroom
URL: http://readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/storytelling-social-studies-classroom-928.html
Description:

In this unit, students tell their own stories and explore the stories of other Americans. Hearing and telling these stories helps students realize that social studies is not simply the study of history, but an exploration of real people and their lives. Students begin by telling stories about their personal experiences. They then explore the character traits that promote democratic ideals and tell stories about family members who exemplify these traits. Finally, they conduct research and share stories about famous Americans. Practiced skills include reading, researching, visually representing, writing, and presenting.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 7 :
7 ) Explain reasons for Alabama's secession from the Union, including sectionalism, slavery, states' rights, and economic disagreements.

•  Identifying Alabama's role in the organization of the Confederacy, including hosting the secession convention and the inauguration ceremony for leaders
•  Recognizing Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy
•  Interpreting the Articles of the Confederation and the Gettysburg Address
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 13 :
13 ) Summarize major legislation and court decisions from 1800 to 1861 that led to increasing sectionalism, including the Missouri Compromise of 1820, the Compromise of 1850, the Fugitive Slave Acts, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Dred Scott decision. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing Alabama's role in the developing sectionalism of the United States from 1819 to 1861, including participation in slavery, secession, the Indian War, and reliance on cotton (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Westward Expansion from 1803 to 1861 to determine its effect on sectionalism, including the Louisiana Purchase, Texas Annexation, and the Mexican Cession
•  Describing tariff debates and the nullification crisis between 1800 and 1861
•  Analyzing the formation of the Republican Party for its impact on the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States
Subject: Social Studies (4 - 10)
Title: Slavery
URL: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/slavery/joKWkxrJJ1j8bCAd#r
Description:

This is a collection of photographs and documents that can be used to help students create a drawing or painting to portray the pain of slavery. Students may also write an essay based on a first-person account looking through the eyes of a slave.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 7 :
7 ) Explain reasons for Alabama's secession from the Union, including sectionalism, slavery, states' rights, and economic disagreements.

•  Identifying Alabama's role in the organization of the Confederacy, including hosting the secession convention and the inauguration ceremony for leaders
•  Recognizing Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy
•  Interpreting the Articles of the Confederation and the Gettysburg Address
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: Social Studies (4 - 5)
Title: Decoding Lincoln: Vocabulary Coding with the Gettysburg Address
URL: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/decoding-lincoln-vocabulary-coding-with-the-gettysburg-address/tqnyjT1FX1aBkFCN#r
Description:

This collection includes photographs, videos, and articles to provide students with background knowledge on Abraham Lincoln and the Gettysburg Address. Students will analyze his word choice in his speech: Which words appear most often? Why?



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (5) 22 :
22 ) Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. [W.5.1]

a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer's purpose. [W.5.1a]

b. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details. [W.5.1b]

c. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically). [W.5.1c]

d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. [W.5.1d]

[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: English Language Arts (5), Social Studies (5)
Title: Dear Mr. President
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/lincoln/dear_president.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students analyze a letter written by Grace Bedell to President Abraham Lincoln. Students will then write and send their own letter to the president of the United States.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 7 :
7 ) Explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting). [RL.3.7]

[ELA2015] (5) 12 :
12 ) Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text. [RI.5.3]

[SS2010] GHS (3) 11 :
11 ) Interpret various primary sources for reconstructing the past, including documents, letters, diaries, maps, and photographs.

•  Comparing maps of the past to maps of the present
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: English Language Arts (3 - 5), Social Studies (3 - 5)
Title: Find Grace's Family
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/lincoln/find_family.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students will analyze a famous letter written by Grace Badell to President Abraham Lincoln. Using hints about Grace's family from the letter, students will draw pictures of her family.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 12 :
12 ) Describe the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin and the role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimké, Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing the rise of religious movements in opposition to slavery, including objections of the Quakers
•  Explaining the importance of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 that banned slavery in new states north of the Ohio River
•  Describing the rise of the Underground Railroad and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman and the impact of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, on the abolitionist movement
Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: John Brown's Legacy
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/militaryhistory/resources/Lesson6.pdf
Description:

In this lesson, students use primary sources relating to the abolitionist John Brown and his rebellion. Students use a creative medium to recognize his contribution to history. Resources included are a portrait of John Brown, an article from Harper's Weekly, a picture of John Brown's rifle, a picture of John Brown going to his death, and a student analysis chart.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 12 :
12 ) Describe the founding of the first abolitionist societies by Benjamin Rush and Benjamin Franklin and the role played by later critics of slavery, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, Angelina and Sarah Grimké, Henry David Thoreau, and Charles Sumner. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Describing the rise of religious movements in opposition to slavery, including objections of the Quakers
•  Explaining the importance of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 that banned slavery in new states north of the Ohio River
•  Describing the rise of the Underground Railroad and its leaders, including Harriet Tubman and the impact of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, on the abolitionist movement
Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: The Time Trial of John Brown
URL: https://americanhistory.si.edu/sites/default/files/file-uploader/Time_Trial_of_John_Brown.pdf
Description:

In this lesson plan, students debate the legacy of John Brown and how he should be remembered. The lesson includes videos of an actor portraying John Brown, a plea to the people of Concord from Henry David Thoreau, and a John Brown song.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (5 - 10)
Title: Exploring the Gettysburg Address
URL: http://americanhistory.si.edu/documentsgallery/exhibitions/education/Gettysburg_Tips_Interactive.pdf
Description:

This is informational material that can be used to teach about the Gettysburg Address. There are links to various resources including a recording of the Gettysburg Address and stories behind the words of the address. Students can also examine the document itself and compare it to other famous speeches such as the "I Have a Dream Speech".



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
Subject: Social Studies (5)
Title: Slavery
URL: http://www.c3teachers.org/inquiries/slavery/
Description:

In this lesson plan, students evaluate the human costs of consumer products (specifically sugar). Students are asked to consider any inhumane means of producing consumer goods today. Click on Download PDF or DOC button for access to additional resources including child labor charts, maps, photos, and descriptions of work on sugar plantations.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 8 :
8 ) Explain Alabama's economic and military role during the Civil War.

Examples: economic—production of iron products, munitions, textiles, and ships

military—provision of military supplies through the Port of Mobile, provision of an armament center at Selma

•  Recognizing military leaders from Alabama during the Civil War
•  Comparing roles of women on the home front and the battlefront during and after the Civil War
•  Explaining economic conditions as a result of the Civil War, including the collapse of the economic structure, destruction of the transportation infrastructure, and high casualty rates
[SS2010] USS5 (5) 11 :
11 ) Identify causes of the Civil War, including states' rights and the issue of slavery.

•  Describing the importance of the Missouri Compromise, Nat Turner's insurrection, the Compromise of 1850, the Dred Scott decision, John Brown's rebellion, and the election of 1860
•  Recognizing key Northern and Southern personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Joseph Wheeler (Alabama)
•  Describing social, economic, and political conditions that affected citizens during the Civil War
•  Identifying Alabama's role in the Civil War (Alabama)
Examples: Montgomery as the first capital of the Confederacy, Winston County's opposition to Alabama's secession (Alabama)

•  Locating on a map sites important to the Civil War
Examples: Mason-Dixon Line, Fort Sumter, Appomattox, Gettysburg, Confederate states, Union states (Alabama)

•  Explaining events that led to the conclusion of the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 11 :
11 ) Evaluate the impact of American social and political reform on the emergence of a distinct culture. [A.1.a., A.1.c., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.j.]

•  Explaining the impact of the Second Great Awakening on the emergence of a national identity
•  Explaining the emergence of uniquely American writers
Examples: James Fenimore Cooper, Henry David Thoreau, Edgar Allen Poe

•  Explaining the influence of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Dorothea Lynde Dix, and Susan B. Anthony on the development of social reform movements prior to the Civil War
[SS2010] US10 (10) 14 :
14 ) Describe how the Civil War influenced the United States, including the Anaconda Plan and the major battles of Bull Run, Antietam, Vicksburg, and Gettysburg and Sherman's March to the Sea. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying key Northern and Southern Civil War personalities, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and William Tecumseh Sherman
Example: President Abraham Lincoln's philosophy of union, executive orders, and leadership

•  Analyzing the impact of the division of the nation during the Civil War regarding resources, population distribution, and transportation
•  Explaining reasons border states remained in the Union during the Civil War
•  Describing nonmilitary events and life during the Civil War, including the Homestead Act, the Morrill Act, Northern draft riots, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the Gettysburg Address
•  Describing the role of women in American society during the Civil War, including efforts made by Elizabeth Blackwell and Clara Barton
•  Tracing Alabama's involvement in the Civil War (Alabama)
Subject: Social Studies (4 - 10)
Title: Who Am I? A History Mystery
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/militaryhistory/resources/whoami/whoami.html
Description:

In this interactive activity, students will compare various roles of men and women at home and on the battlefront during the Civil War by playing an interactive game. Students choose a mystery character from the Civil War and select objects as clues to their identity. 



ALEX Classroom Resources: 18

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