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Classroom Resources (7)


ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 14 :
14 ) Describe causes and consequences of World War II.

Examples: causes—unanswered aggression, Axis goal of world conquest

consequences—changes in political boundaries; Allied goals; lasting issues such as the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and Nuremberg Trials

•  Explaining the rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan
•  Identifying turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters
•  Depicting geographic locations of world events between 1939 and 1945
•  Identifying on a map changes in national borders as a result of World War II
Subject: Social Studies (9)
Title: World War II/Crash Course World History
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ea220c2e-a462-4d86-a6dc-55c8fe58a989/world-war-ii-crash-course-world-history-38/
Description:

John Green teaches you about World War II, aka The Great Patriotic War, aka The Big One. So how did this war happen? And what does it mean? We've all learned the facts about World War II many times over, thanks to repeated classroom coverage, the History channel, and your grandfather (or maybe great-grandfather) showing you that Nazi bayonet he used to keep in his sock drawer and telling you a bunch of age-inappropriate stories about his harrowing war experiences. So, why did the Axis powers think forceful expansion was a good idea? (they were hungry). So why did this thing shake out in favor of the Allies? Hint: it has to do with the fact that it was a world war. Germany and Japan made some pretty serious strategic errors, such as invading Russia and attacking the United States, and those errors meant that pretty much the whole world was against them. So, find out how this worldwide alliance came together to stop the Axis expansion. All this, plus Canada finally gets the respectful treatment it deserves.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 5 :
5 ) Describe the rise of absolutism and constitutionalism and their impact on European nations.

•  Contrasting philosophies of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke and the belief in the divine right of kings
•  Comparing absolutism as it developed in France, Russia, and Prussia, including the reigns of Louis XIV, Peter the Great, and Frederick the Great
•  Identifying major provisions of the Petition of Rights and the English Bill of Rights
[SS2010] WH9 (9) 14 :
14 ) Describe causes and consequences of World War II.

Examples: causes—unanswered aggression, Axis goal of world conquest

consequences—changes in political boundaries; Allied goals; lasting issues such as the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and Nuremberg Trials

•  Explaining the rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan
•  Identifying turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters
•  Depicting geographic locations of world events between 1939 and 1945
•  Identifying on a map changes in national borders as a result of World War II
[SS2010] US11 (11) 8 :
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
[SS2010] USG (12) 1 :
1 ) Explain historical and philosophical origins that shaped the government of the United States, including the Magna Carta, the Petition of Rights, the English Bill of Rights, the Mayflower Compact, the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and the influence of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean-Jaques Rousseau, and the Great Awakening.

•  Comparing characteristics of limited and unlimited governments throughout the world, including constitutional, authoritarian, and totalitarian governments
Examples: constitutional—United States

authoritarian—Iran

totalitarian—North Korea

Subject: Social Studies (9 - 12)
Title: The Rise of the West and Historical Methodology/Crash Course World History
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/8fe2c7e9-8d1e-4f70-9fbd-946eb8082910/the-rise-of-the-west-and-historical-methodology-crash-course-world-history-212/
Description:

Join host John Green to learn about the methods of writing history by looking at some of the ways that the rise of the West has been recorded. In the episode, we'll cover what the West is, the Rise of the West, and the different ways that historians and other academics have explained how the West became dominant in the world. Also discussed are explanations from Acemoglu and Robinson's Why Nations Fail, Francis Fukuyama's The Origins of Political Order, and Ian Morris's Why the West Rules, for Now.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS6 (6) 6 :
6 ) Identify causes and consequences of World War II and reasons for the United States' entry into the war.

•  Locating on a map Allied countries and Axis Powers
•  Locating on a map key engagements of World War II, including Pearl Harbor; the battles of Normandy, Stalingrad, and Midway; and the Battle of the Bulge
•  Identifying key figures of World War II, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Sir Winston Churchill, Harry S. Truman, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Michinomiya Hirohito, and Hideki Tōjō
•  Describing the development of and the decision to use the atomic bomb
•  Describing human costs associated with World War II
Examples: the Holocaust, civilian and military casualties

•  Explaining the importance of the surrender of the Axis Powers ending World War II
[SS2010] WH9 (9) 14 :
14 ) Describe causes and consequences of World War II.

Examples: causes—unanswered aggression, Axis goal of world conquest

consequences—changes in political boundaries; Allied goals; lasting issues such as the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and Nuremberg Trials

•  Explaining the rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan
•  Identifying turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters
•  Depicting geographic locations of world events between 1939 and 1945
•  Identifying on a map changes in national borders as a result of World War II
Subject: Social Studies (6 - 9)
Title: Murals of the Holocaust
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/a0b0cec5-daf5-4e46-a8fb-9c64dcbcdc4b/murals-of-the-holocaust-images/
Description:

For over 20 years, a summer program for gifted adolescents at Western Kentucky University has offered an arts-integrated history course on Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. The course concludes with students working as a group to create a large mural on the Holocaust. In this way, students use the power of art to deal with their own emotions as well as to educate others.

In Fall 2017, murals from the past 20 years went on a traveling display in Kentucky to engage a broader audience in thought-provoking conversation on the topic. This image collection shows the completed murals created over the 20-year span of the program. 

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS6 (6) 6 :
6 ) Identify causes and consequences of World War II and reasons for the United States' entry into the war.

•  Locating on a map Allied countries and Axis Powers
•  Locating on a map key engagements of World War II, including Pearl Harbor; the battles of Normandy, Stalingrad, and Midway; and the Battle of the Bulge
•  Identifying key figures of World War II, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Sir Winston Churchill, Harry S. Truman, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Michinomiya Hirohito, and Hideki Tōjō
•  Describing the development of and the decision to use the atomic bomb
•  Describing human costs associated with World War II
Examples: the Holocaust, civilian and military casualties

•  Explaining the importance of the surrender of the Axis Powers ending World War II
[SS2010] WH9 (9) 14 :
14 ) Describe causes and consequences of World War II.

Examples: causes—unanswered aggression, Axis goal of world conquest

consequences—changes in political boundaries; Allied goals; lasting issues such as the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and Nuremberg Trials

•  Explaining the rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan
•  Identifying turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters
•  Depicting geographic locations of world events between 1939 and 1945
•  Identifying on a map changes in national borders as a result of World War II
[SS2010] US11 (11) 9 :
9 ) Describe the significance of major battles, events, and consequences of World War II campaigns, including North Africa, Midway, Normandy, Okinawa, the Battle of the Bulge, Iwo Jima, and the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Locating on a map or globe the major battles of World War II and the extent of the Allied and Axis territorial expansion
•  Describing military strategies of World War II, including blitzkrieg, island-hopping, and amphibious landings
•  Explaining reasons for and results of dropping atomic bombs on Japan
•  Explaining events and consequences of war crimes committed during World War II, including the Holocaust, the Bataan Death March, the Nuremberg Trials, the post-war Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the Genocide Convention
Subject: Social Studies (6 - 11)
Title: Coming of Age During the Holocaust
URL: https://education.mjhnyc.org/coming-of-age-during-the-holocaust/
Description:

This free, interactive website helps middle and high school-aged students explore Holocaust history and themes of identity and personal responsibility. Part of the larger Museum of Jewish Heritage Holocaust Curriculum website, Coming of Age During the Holocaust features first-person accounts of young people who survived the Holocaust, integrating compelling videos, narratives, and primary documents with online discussions and engaging activities.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS6 (6) 6 :
6 ) Identify causes and consequences of World War II and reasons for the United States' entry into the war.

•  Locating on a map Allied countries and Axis Powers
•  Locating on a map key engagements of World War II, including Pearl Harbor; the battles of Normandy, Stalingrad, and Midway; and the Battle of the Bulge
•  Identifying key figures of World War II, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Sir Winston Churchill, Harry S. Truman, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Michinomiya Hirohito, and Hideki Tōjō
•  Describing the development of and the decision to use the atomic bomb
•  Describing human costs associated with World War II
Examples: the Holocaust, civilian and military casualties

•  Explaining the importance of the surrender of the Axis Powers ending World War II
[SS2010] WH9 (9) 14 :
14 ) Describe causes and consequences of World War II.

Examples: causes—unanswered aggression, Axis goal of world conquest

consequences—changes in political boundaries; Allied goals; lasting issues such as the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and Nuremberg Trials

•  Explaining the rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan
•  Identifying turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters
•  Depicting geographic locations of world events between 1939 and 1945
•  Identifying on a map changes in national borders as a result of World War II
[SS2010] US11 (11) 9 :
9 ) Describe the significance of major battles, events, and consequences of World War II campaigns, including North Africa, Midway, Normandy, Okinawa, the Battle of the Bulge, Iwo Jima, and the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Locating on a map or globe the major battles of World War II and the extent of the Allied and Axis territorial expansion
•  Describing military strategies of World War II, including blitzkrieg, island-hopping, and amphibious landings
•  Explaining reasons for and results of dropping atomic bombs on Japan
•  Explaining events and consequences of war crimes committed during World War II, including the Holocaust, the Bataan Death March, the Nuremberg Trials, the post-war Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the Genocide Convention
Subject: Social Studies (6 - 11)
Title: Lesson One: Introduction to Jewish Life During the Holocaust
URL: https://education.mjhnyc.org/lessons/lesson-plan-one-introduction-to-jewish-life-during-the-holocaust/
Description:

This lesson provides an introduction to the study of the Holocaust and can be used as the first lesson of a larger unit, or a stand-alone lesson to discuss essential content and themes. The Holocaust refers to the systematic murder of six million Jews, and millions of others, by Nazi Germany and its collaborators during World War II. The Nazi Party came to power in 1933. Its leader, Adolf Hitler, was appointed chancellor of Germany and began to target Jews. Roma/Sinti, those with physical or mental disabilities, LGBTQ people, political dissidents, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and others were considered enemies by the Nazis and not worthy of human rights.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS6 (6) 6 :
6 ) Identify causes and consequences of World War II and reasons for the United States' entry into the war.

•  Locating on a map Allied countries and Axis Powers
•  Locating on a map key engagements of World War II, including Pearl Harbor; the battles of Normandy, Stalingrad, and Midway; and the Battle of the Bulge
•  Identifying key figures of World War II, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Sir Winston Churchill, Harry S. Truman, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Michinomiya Hirohito, and Hideki Tōjō
•  Describing the development of and the decision to use the atomic bomb
•  Describing human costs associated with World War II
Examples: the Holocaust, civilian and military casualties

•  Explaining the importance of the surrender of the Axis Powers ending World War II
[SS2010] WH9 (9) 14 :
14 ) Describe causes and consequences of World War II.

Examples: causes—unanswered aggression, Axis goal of world conquest

consequences—changes in political boundaries; Allied goals; lasting issues such as the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and Nuremberg Trials

•  Explaining the rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan
•  Identifying turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters
•  Depicting geographic locations of world events between 1939 and 1945
•  Identifying on a map changes in national borders as a result of World War II
[SS2010] US11 (11) 9 :
9 ) Describe the significance of major battles, events, and consequences of World War II campaigns, including North Africa, Midway, Normandy, Okinawa, the Battle of the Bulge, Iwo Jima, and the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Locating on a map or globe the major battles of World War II and the extent of the Allied and Axis territorial expansion
•  Describing military strategies of World War II, including blitzkrieg, island-hopping, and amphibious landings
•  Explaining reasons for and results of dropping atomic bombs on Japan
•  Explaining events and consequences of war crimes committed during World War II, including the Holocaust, the Bataan Death March, the Nuremberg Trials, the post-war Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the Genocide Convention
Subject: Social Studies (6 - 11)
Title: Holocaust
URL: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/holocaust/RkeVcBCMRdtgaioG#r
Description:

This collection includes videos, photographs, and articles about the Holocaust. Students can use this collection to explore what life might have been like during the Holocaust.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS6 (6) 6 :
6 ) Identify causes and consequences of World War II and reasons for the United States' entry into the war.

•  Locating on a map Allied countries and Axis Powers
•  Locating on a map key engagements of World War II, including Pearl Harbor; the battles of Normandy, Stalingrad, and Midway; and the Battle of the Bulge
•  Identifying key figures of World War II, including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Sir Winston Churchill, Harry S. Truman, Joseph Stalin, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Michinomiya Hirohito, and Hideki Tōjō
•  Describing the development of and the decision to use the atomic bomb
•  Describing human costs associated with World War II
Examples: the Holocaust, civilian and military casualties

•  Explaining the importance of the surrender of the Axis Powers ending World War II
[SS2010] USS6 (6) 7 :
7 ) Identify changes on the American home front during World War II.

Example: rationing

•  Recognizing the retooling of factories from consumer to military production
•  Identifying new roles of women and African Americans in the workforce
•  Describing increased demand on the Birmingham steel industry and Port of Mobile facilities (Alabama)
•  Describing the experience of African Americans and Japanese Americans in the United States during World War II, including the Tuskegee Airmen and occupants of internment camps (Alabama)
[SS2010] WH9 (9) 14 :
14 ) Describe causes and consequences of World War II.

Examples: causes—unanswered aggression, Axis goal of world conquest

consequences—changes in political boundaries; Allied goals; lasting issues such as the Holocaust, Atomic Age, and Nuremberg Trials

•  Explaining the rise of militarist and totalitarian states in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and Japan
•  Identifying turning points of World War II in the European and Pacific Theaters
•  Depicting geographic locations of world events between 1939 and 1945
•  Identifying on a map changes in national borders as a result of World War II
Subject: Social Studies (6 - 9)
Title: History Explorer: The Nisei Soldiers
URL: http://americanhistory.si.edu/connect/podcasts/history-explorer-nisei-soldiers-0
Description:

This podcast is a collection of personal stories told from soldiers and family members of Japanese Americans (Nisei) who volunteered to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II. The podcast describes the experiences of some Japanese Americans and the consequences of World War II.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 7

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