ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (4) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (2) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (7)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (11) 1 :
1 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RL.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (11) 27 :
27 ) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. [W.11-12.9]

a. Apply Grade 11 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Demonstrate knowledge of twentieth- and twenty-first-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics"). [W.11-12.9a] (Alabama)

b. Apply Grade 11 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., Analyze seminal United States documents of historical and literary significance [e.g., Roosevelt's "Four Freedoms" speech, King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail"]), including how they address related themes and concepts. [W.11-12.9b] (Alabama)

[ELA2015] (11) 29 :
29 ) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. [SL.11-12.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. [SL.11-12.1a]

b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed. [SL.11-12.1b]

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives. [SL.11-12.1c]

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task. [SL.11-12.1d]

[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Subject: English Language Arts (11), or Social Studies (11)
Title: "Should They Stay, or Should They Go?" Considering the Point of View of an Alabama Citizen Regarding the World War I Draft
Description:

In this lesson, students will read and critically examine a letter from an Alabama farm owner to a U.S. Senator from Alabama regarding exemption status for the 1917 Selective Service Act on behalf of one of her workers. This primary source document will allow the students to practice evaluating a complex text. The students will answer active reading questions in order to participate in a "Philosophical Chairs" class debate regarding the merit of the farm owner's request. The Philosophical Chairs activity will allow the students to verbally articulate an argumentative position while specifically using textual evidence in order to be able to defend his or her position.

*Note:  Bibliography of resources used can be found at the end of the "Lesson Procedures Section" of this lesson.

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (11) 1 :
1 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RL.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (11) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[ELA2015] (11) 25 :
25 ) Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. [W.11-12.7]

[ELA2015] (11) 29 :
29 ) Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. [SL.11-12.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas. [SL.11-12.1a]

b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed. [SL.11-12.1b]

c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives. [SL.11-12.1c]

d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task. [SL.11-12.1d]

[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
[SS2010] US11 (11) 10 :
10 ) Describe the impact of World War II on the lives of American citizens, including wartime economic measures, population shifts, growth in the middle class, growth of industrialization, advancements in science and technology, increased wealth in the African-American community, racial and ethnic tensions, Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (G. I. Bill of Rights), and desegregation of the military. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Describing Alabama's participation in World War II, including the role of the Tuskegee Airmen, the Aliceville Prisoner of War (POW) camp, growth of the Port of Mobile, production of Birmingham steel, and the establishment of military bases (Alabama)
Subject: English Language Arts (11), or Social Studies (11)
Title: "Cheer, Cheer, for the 'Red, White, and Blue!'" University and High School Students' Contributions and Participation during the World Wars
Description:

Students will examine and evaluate both college and high school students' support of and involvement in the World Wars. Students will research both photographic and textual resources in order to produce factual information about how students reacted to World Wars 1 and 2. This lesson will culminate in a student-driven Socratic Seminar style discussion which will allow the students to verbally articulate their findings from the resources provided.

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (11) 9 :
9 ) By the end of Grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the Grades 11-College and Career Readiness (CCR) text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.11-12.10]

[ELA2015] (11) 10 :
10 ) Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. [RI.11-12.1]

[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
[SS2010] US11 (11) 3 :
3 ) Explain the United States' changing role in the early twentieth century as a world power. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Describing causes of the Spanish-American War, including yellow journalism, the sinking of the Battleship USS Maine, and economic interests in Cuba
•  Identifying the role of the Rough Riders on the iconic status of President Theodore Roosevelt
•  Describing consequences of the Spanish-American War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1898, insurgency in the Philippines, and territorial expansion in the Pacific and Caribbean
•  Analyzing the involvement of the United States in the Hawaiian Islands for economic and imperialistic interests
•  Appraising Alabama's contributions to the United States between Reconstruction and World War I, including those of William Crawford Gorgas, Joseph Wheeler, and John Tyler Morgan (Alabama)
•  Evaluating the role of the Open Door policy and the Roosevelt Corollary on America's expanding economic and geographic interests
•  Comparing the executive leadership represented by William Howard Taft's Dollar Diplomacy, Theodore Roosevelt's Big Stick Diplomacy, and Woodrow Wilson's Moral Diplomacy
[ELA2015] (11) 24 :
24 ) Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information. [W.11-12.6]

Subject: English Language Arts (11), or Social Studies (11)
Title: Not so Fast, Mr. President!: Examining American Opposition to Involvement in World War I
Description:

In this lesson, students will be examining primary sources pertaining to differing viewpoints of America's involvement in World War I. The students will annotate the documents, looking for main ideas and supporting details. The students will then form graphic organizers separating two opposing viewpoints. Finally, students will write a group expository essay using the data from the graphic organizer.

This lesson was created as part of the Alabama Bicentennial Commission’s Curriculum Development Project.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: Yellow Journalism
Description:

In this lesson, students will describe causes of involvement of the United States in Wold War I by defining yellow journalism, and its effect on the United States becoming involved in a war with Spain over its territories in the Caribbean Sea and the Philippine Islands. By viewing primary source documents of newspaper articles from Alabama, the students will make judgments as to the effectiveness of the newspaper articles.

This lesson was created as a part of the Alabama History Education Initiative, funded by a generous grant from the Malone Family Foundation in 2009.

AuthorInformation: Ronald Shephard (Cohort 2: 2010-2011)
Central High School Phenix City Schools Phenix City, AL




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 12 :
12 ) Explain causes and consequences of World War I, including imperialism, militarism, nationalism, and the alliance system.

•  Describing the rise of Communism in Russia during World War I
Examples: return of Vladimir Lenin, rise of the Bolsheviks

•  Describing military technology used during World War I
•  Identifying problems created by the Treaty of Versailles of 1919
Examples: Germany's reparations and war guilt, international controversy over the League of Nations

•  Identifying alliances during World War I and boundary changes after World War I
[SS2010] US11 (11) 3 :
3 ) Explain the United States' changing role in the early twentieth century as a world power. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Describing causes of the Spanish-American War, including yellow journalism, the sinking of the Battleship USS Maine, and economic interests in Cuba
•  Identifying the role of the Rough Riders on the iconic status of President Theodore Roosevelt
•  Describing consequences of the Spanish-American War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1898, insurgency in the Philippines, and territorial expansion in the Pacific and Caribbean
•  Analyzing the involvement of the United States in the Hawaiian Islands for economic and imperialistic interests
•  Appraising Alabama's contributions to the United States between Reconstruction and World War I, including those of William Crawford Gorgas, Joseph Wheeler, and John Tyler Morgan (Alabama)
•  Evaluating the role of the Open Door policy and the Roosevelt Corollary on America's expanding economic and geographic interests
•  Comparing the executive leadership represented by William Howard Taft's Dollar Diplomacy, Theodore Roosevelt's Big Stick Diplomacy, and Woodrow Wilson's Moral Diplomacy
[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Subject: Social Studies (9 - 11)
Title: U.S. Imperialism:
Description:

The image resource is an annotated ThingLink image that has embedded information and questions relating to the analysis of the political cartoon "School Begins".

ThingLink allows a user to take an image to augment it by adding a layer of annotations "over" the image. Annotations can include videos, links, and user created text.

Students will hover over the images at "touch points" where information is embedded such as questions and information about the political cartoon. This information will be used to analyze the political carton.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US10 (10) 3 :
3 ) Trace the chronology of events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, passage of the Stamp Act, the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, passage of the Intolerable Acts, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, the publication of Common Sense, and the signing of the Declaration of Independence. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Explaining the role of key revolutionary leaders, including George Washington; John Adams; Thomas Jefferson; Patrick Henry; Samuel Adams; Paul Revere; Crispus Attucks; and Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette
•  Explaining the significance of revolutionary battles, including Bunker Hill, Trenton, Saratoga, and Yorktown
•  Summarizing major ideas of the Declaration of Independence, including the theories of John Locke, Charles de Montesquieu, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau
•  Comparing perspectives of differing groups in society and their roles in the American Revolution, including men, women, white settlers, free and enslaved African Americans, and American Indians
•  Describing how provisions of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 affected relations of the United States with European nations and American Indians
[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
[SS2010] US11 (11) 8 :
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
[SS2010] US11 (11) 9 :
9 ) Describe the significance of major battles, events, and consequences of World War II campaigns, including North Africa, Midway, Normandy, Okinawa, the Battle of the Bulge, Iwo Jima, and the Yalta and Potsdam Conferences. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Locating on a map or globe the major battles of World War II and the extent of the Allied and Axis territorial expansion
•  Describing military strategies of World War II, including blitzkrieg, island-hopping, and amphibious landings
•  Explaining reasons for and results of dropping atomic bombs on Japan
•  Explaining events and consequences of war crimes committed during World War II, including the Holocaust, the Bataan Death March, the Nuremberg Trials, the post-war Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the Genocide Convention
Subject: Social Studies (10 - 11)
Title: Koosh!! You're Out!
Description:

In this learning activity, students will explain the causes of World War II and key events through an interactive SMART Board game played with Koosh balls.  This interactive game download allows SMART Board users to customize the template to review various curricular concepts, terms, dates, and events.  Students will play this game by throwing one or more Koosh balls (or other soft object such as a bean bag) at the Smart Board. Each circle is linked to a different page in the notebook.  The teacher will need to fill in the pages with sight words, math facts, review questions, etc.




ALEX Learning Activities: 2

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 12 :
12 ) Explain causes and consequences of World War I, including imperialism, militarism, nationalism, and the alliance system.

•  Describing the rise of Communism in Russia during World War I
Examples: return of Vladimir Lenin, rise of the Bolsheviks

•  Describing military technology used during World War I
•  Identifying problems created by the Treaty of Versailles of 1919
Examples: Germany's reparations and war guilt, international controversy over the League of Nations

•  Identifying alliances during World War I and boundary changes after World War I
[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
[SS2010] US11 (11) 8 :
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
Subject: Social Studies (9 - 11)
Title: Who Started World War I/Crash Course World History
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/4471f4bf-9e53-46d1-9ddf-7b3cdcc6942c/who-started-world-war-i-crash-course-world-history-210/
Description:

Join host John Green to learn about the reasons World War I started and why the situation is so complicated. We'll try to get to the bottom of the confusion. However, it's very hard to assign blame to any one of the nations involved. Did the fault lie with Austria-Hungary? Germany? Russia? Julius Caesar? Join us for an interesting discussion in this episode of Crash Course.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 12 :
12 ) Explain causes and consequences of World War I, including imperialism, militarism, nationalism, and the alliance system.

•  Describing the rise of Communism in Russia during World War I
Examples: return of Vladimir Lenin, rise of the Bolsheviks

•  Describing military technology used during World War I
•  Identifying problems created by the Treaty of Versailles of 1919
Examples: Germany's reparations and war guilt, international controversy over the League of Nations

•  Identifying alliances during World War I and boundary changes after World War I
[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
[SS2010] US11 (11) 8 :
8 ) Summarize events leading to World War II, including the militarization of the Rhineland, Germany's seizure of Austria and Czechoslovakia, Japan's invasion of China, and the Rape of Nanjing. [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing the impact of fascism, Nazism, and communism on growing conflicts in Europe
•  Explaining the isolationist debate as it evolved from the 1920s to the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the subsequent change in United States' foreign policy
•  Identifying roles of significant World War II leaders
Examples: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George S. Patton, Sir Winston Churchill, Bernard Montgomery, Joseph Stalin, Benito Mussolini, Emperor Hirohito, Hedeki Tōjō, Erwin Rommel, Adolf Hitler

•  Evaluating the impact of the Munich Pact and the failed British policy of appeasement resulting in the invasion of Poland
Subject: Social Studies (9 - 11)
Title: How World War I Started/Crash Course World History
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/d8148c7c-655f-400e-b880-bd115fdecc7f/how-world-war-i-started-crash-course-world-history-209/
Description:

Join host John Green to learn about World War I and the confusion surrounding its beginning. You'll learn about Franz Ferdinand, Gavrilo Pincep, the Black Hand, and why the Serbian nationalists wanted to kill the Archduke. While there's no good answer as to who exactly started the war, this episode of Crash Course will sort through the dates and confusion with lively discussion as always.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 12 :
12 ) Explain causes and consequences of World War I, including imperialism, militarism, nationalism, and the alliance system.

•  Describing the rise of Communism in Russia during World War I
Examples: return of Vladimir Lenin, rise of the Bolsheviks

•  Describing military technology used during World War I
•  Identifying problems created by the Treaty of Versailles of 1919
Examples: Germany's reparations and war guilt, international controversy over the League of Nations

•  Identifying alliances during World War I and boundary changes after World War I
[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Subject: Social Studies (9 - 11)
Title: How World War I Changed the World Forever
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/e6f796c9-651c-4351-bbd7-04e4376703e9/how-wwi-changed-the-world-forever/
Description:

World War I drastically altered the global map and changed the course of history. Help students explore and analyze the war with this PBS NewsHour video and educational materials.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS6 (6) 3 :
3 ) Identify causes and consequences of World War I and reasons for the United States' entry into the war.

Examples: sinking of the Lusitania, Zimmerman Note, alliances, militarism, imperialism, nationalism

•  Describing military and civilian roles in the United States during World War I
•  Explaining roles of important persons associated with World War I, including Woodrow Wilson and Archduke Franz Ferdinand
•  Analyzing technological advances of the World War I era for their impact on modern warfare
Examples: machine gun, tank, submarine, airplane, poisonous gas, gas mask

•  Locating on a map major countries involved in World War I and boundary changes after the war
•  Explaining the intensification of isolationism in the United States after World War I
Example: reaction of the Congress of the United States to the Treaty of Versailles, League of Nations, and Red Scare

•  Recognizing the strategic placement of military bases in Alabama (Alabama)
[SS2010] WH9 (9) 12 :
12 ) Explain causes and consequences of World War I, including imperialism, militarism, nationalism, and the alliance system.

•  Describing the rise of Communism in Russia during World War I
Examples: return of Vladimir Lenin, rise of the Bolsheviks

•  Describing military technology used during World War I
•  Identifying problems created by the Treaty of Versailles of 1919
Examples: Germany's reparations and war guilt, international controversy over the League of Nations

•  Identifying alliances during World War I and boundary changes after World War I
[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Subject: Social Studies (6 - 11)
Title: World War I/History in a Nutshell
URL: https://www.knowitall.org/video/world-war-i-history-nutshell
Description:

This is a brief video on World War I: how the war started, the U.S.' involvement, fighting the war, and the aftermath with the Treaty of Versailles.

*Important Note: Italy was originally a member of the Triple Alliance when World War I started. After the war started in 1914, when the Triple Alliance became the Central Powers, Italy joined the Triple Entente. The Triple Alliance was originally a defensive pact against the Triple Entente. After Italy switched sides, the Ottoman Empire joined the Central Powers.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 2 :
2 ) Evaluate social and political origins, accomplishments, and limitations of Progressivism. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Explaining the impact of the Populist Movement on the role of the federal government in American society
•  Assessing the impact of muckrakers on public opinion during the Progressive movement, including Upton Sinclair, Jacob A. Riis, and Ida M. Tarbell
Examples: women's suffrage, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, temperance movement

•  Explaining national legislation affecting the Progressive movement, including the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act
•  Determining the influence of the Niagara Movement, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Carter G. Woodson on the Progressive Era
•  Assessing the significance of the public education movement initiated by Horace Mann
•  Comparing the presidential leadership of Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson in obtaining passage of measures regarding trust-busting, the Hepburn Act, the Pure Food and Drug Act, the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Reserve Act, and conservation
[SS2010] US11 (11) 3 :
3 ) Explain the United States' changing role in the early twentieth century as a world power. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Describing causes of the Spanish-American War, including yellow journalism, the sinking of the Battleship USS Maine, and economic interests in Cuba
•  Identifying the role of the Rough Riders on the iconic status of President Theodore Roosevelt
•  Describing consequences of the Spanish-American War, including the Treaty of Paris of 1898, insurgency in the Philippines, and territorial expansion in the Pacific and Caribbean
•  Analyzing the involvement of the United States in the Hawaiian Islands for economic and imperialistic interests
•  Appraising Alabama's contributions to the United States between Reconstruction and World War I, including those of William Crawford Gorgas, Joseph Wheeler, and John Tyler Morgan (Alabama)
•  Evaluating the role of the Open Door policy and the Roosevelt Corollary on America's expanding economic and geographic interests
•  Comparing the executive leadership represented by William Howard Taft's Dollar Diplomacy, Theodore Roosevelt's Big Stick Diplomacy, and Woodrow Wilson's Moral Diplomacy
[SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: Progressive Presidents/Crash Course US History #29
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/5a8643c4-8bcb-47d7-a672-d4fa1c8ae635/progressive-presidents-crash-course-us-history-29/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about the Progressive Presidents. The presidents most associated with the Progressive Era are Theodore Roosevelt, William Taft, and Woodrow Wilson. During the times these guys held office, trusts were busted, national parks were founded, social programs were enacted, and tariffs were lowered. It wasn't all positive though, as their collective tenure also saw Latin America invaded A LOT, a split in the Republican party that resulted in a Bull Moose, all kinds of other international intervention, and the end of the Progressive Era saw the United States involved in World War.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: America in World War I/Crash Course US History
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/28938bf4-4166-41a0-bce3-cffc569d88c2/america-in-world-war-i-crash-course-us-history-30/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about American involvement in World War I, which at the time was called the Great War. The United States stayed out of World War I at first because Americans were in an isolationist mood in the early 20th century. That didn't last though, as the affronts piled up and drew the US into the war. You'll learn the war's effects on the home front, some of Woodrow Wilson's XIV Points, and just how the war ended up expanding the power of the government in Americans' lives.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 4 :
4 ) Describe causes, events, and the impact of military involvement of the United States in World War I, including mobilization and economic and political changes. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Identifying the role of militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism in World War I
•  Explaining controversies over the Treaty of Versailles of 1919, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the League of Nations
•  Explaining how the Treaty of Versailles led to worsening economic and political conditions in Europe, including greater opportunities for the rise of fascist states in Germany, Italy, and Spain
•  Comparing short- and long-term effects of changing boundaries in pre- and post-World War I in Europe and the Middle East, leading to the creation of new countries
Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: Treaty of Versailles
URL: http://www.c3teachers.org/inquiries/treaty-of-versailles/
Description:

In this activity, students explore the controversy surrounding the Treaty of Versailles and consider if the treaty might have caused World War II.  



ALEX Classroom Resources: 7

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