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Classroom Resources (11)


ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 13 :
13 ) Explain challenges of the post-World War I period.

Examples: 1920s cultural disillusionment, colonial rebellion and turmoil in Ireland and India, attempts to achieve political stability in Europe

•  Identifying causes of the Great Depression
•  Characterizing the global impact of the Great Depression
[SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

Subject: Social Studies (9 - 11)
Title: It's A Wonderful Life Bank Run
URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iPkJH6BT7dM
Description:

George Bailey gives out loans to the community members in order to hold them over until the bank officially opens. 

“What is a 'bank run'?" So, if you and a hundred other people each deposit $100 in the bank, the bank turns around and loans out as much as they can.

It's a Wonderful Life begins in the party economy of the 1920s, during the rise of capitalism in America. The growth of the economy and rapid technological advances during this post-war period lead to improvements in production and telecommunication, increasing the importance of financial markets and allowing companies to make money by the sale of shares. As a result, financial markets open ownership of companies to the public. In the 1920s, when business was booming and many people were making money in the market, the public became very excited about the get-rich-quick opportunities they saw in a market they didn't necessarily understand. When the ignorant public began throwing their money into the stock market on the unstable basis of margin buying, money in the market became inflated until the market eventually imploded. Numerous people, businesses, and banks were financially ruined in the stock market crashes of 1929. Speculating heavily with their deposits, many banks were totally wiped out during the crash of 1929, which created a run on the banking system. The crashes, along with other social, political, and economic disasters, provoked the Great Depression.

The Great Depression is the backdrop for It's a Wonderful Life, and although the film does not delve deeply into the economics of the depression, it influences and affects every aspect of the movie. The first major impact the depression has on Bedford Falls is the run on the bank. Everyone in town is in a panic because of the market crash, and fearful that they may lose all of their money in the Savings and Loan, the public rushes to the bank in an attempt to retrieve it. Fortunately, the Savings and Loans were not financially ruined in the crash, but the bank system does not allow for all of the money of its customers to be kept in the bank itself. Therefore, George has difficulty explaining to the residents of Bedford Falls that he does not have all of their money in the bank at any specific time. So during the crash, when Mr. Potter offers fifty cents on the dollar, many people are willing to take that cut in their savings in order to have the security of money in their wallets. George is able to foil Potter's plan to shut down the Savings and Loan by dispensing his honeymoon money to the desperate people, retaining their patronage. This is neither the first nor the last time that Potter tries to shut down the Savings and Loan.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 13 :
13 ) Explain challenges of the post-World War I period.

Examples: 1920s cultural disillusionment, colonial rebellion and turmoil in Ireland and India, attempts to achieve political stability in Europe

•  Identifying causes of the Great Depression
•  Characterizing the global impact of the Great Depression
[SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

Subject: Social Studies (9 - 11)
Title: The Crash of 1929 - Primary Resources: Headlines
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/arct14.soc.amexcrahea/the-crash-of-1929-primary-resources-headlines/
Description:

Throughout 1929 daily papers reported that the future looked bright for investors -- even after the devastating market crash in October. Learn more with these primary sources, from American Experience: "The Crash of 1929."



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 2 :
2 ) Evaluate social and political origins, accomplishments, and limitations of Progressivism. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Explaining the impact of the Populist Movement on the role of the federal government in American society
•  Assessing the impact of muckrakers on public opinion during the Progressive movement, including Upton Sinclair, Jacob A. Riis, and Ida M. Tarbell
Examples: women's suffrage, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, temperance movement

•  Explaining national legislation affecting the Progressive movement, including the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act
•  Determining the influence of the Niagara Movement, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Carter G. Woodson on the Progressive Era
•  Assessing the significance of the public education movement initiated by Horace Mann
•  Comparing the presidential leadership of Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson in obtaining passage of measures regarding trust-busting, the Hepburn Act, the Pure Food and Drug Act, the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Reserve Act, and conservation
[SS2010] US11 (11) 5 :
5 ) Evaluate the impact of social changes and the influence of key figures in the United States from World War I through the 1920s, including Prohibition, the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, the Scopes Trial, limits on immigration, Ku Klux Klan activities, the Red Scare, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Migration, the Jazz Age, Susan B. Anthony, Margaret Sanger, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, W. C. Handy, and Zelda Fitzgerald. (Alabama) [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing radio, cinema, and print media for their impact on the creation of mass culture
•  Analyzing works of major American artists and writers, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, and H. L. Mencken, to characterize the era of the 1920s
•  Determining the relationship between technological innovations and the creation of increased leisure time
[SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

[SS2010] CWI (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Compare information presented through various media, including television, newspapers, magazines, journals, and the Internet.

•  Explaining the reliability of news stories and their sources
•  Describing the use, misuse, and meaning of different media materials, including photographs, artwork, and film clips
•  Critiquing viewpoints presented in editorial writing and political cartoons, including the use of symbols that represent viewpoints
•  Describing the role of intentional and unintentional bias and flawed samplings
Subject: Social Studies (9 - 12)
Title: The Crash of 1929 - Photo Gallery: The Roaring 20s
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/arct14.soc.amexcraroa/the-crash-of-1929-photo-gallery-the-roaring-20s/
Description:

Many Americans spent the 1920s in a great mood. Investors flocked to a rising stock market. Companies launched brand-new, cutting-edge products, like radios and washing machines. Exuberant Americans kicked up their heels to jazz music, tried crazy stunts, and supported a black market in liquor after Prohibition. A popular expression of the time asked, "What will they think of next?" See the blue-skies optimism of the Roaring Twenties with this gallery from American Experience: "The Crash of 1929."



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] WH9 (9) 13 :
13 ) Explain challenges of the post-World War I period.

Examples: 1920s cultural disillusionment, colonial rebellion and turmoil in Ireland and India, attempts to achieve political stability in Europe

•  Identifying causes of the Great Depression
•  Characterizing the global impact of the Great Depression
[SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

Subject: Social Studies (9 - 11)
Title: The Wheat Bubble Burst
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/wheat-bubble-dust-bowl-video-9026/ken-burns-the-dust-bowl/
Description:

The stock market crashed on October 29, 1929, a day that would come to be known as "Black Tuesday." The crash punctured a speculative bubble that had been building throughout the 1920s, throwing one-and-a-half million Americans out of work. In three years, that number would triple. In response to the lower wheat prices, more wheat was planted.

Learning Objective:

Students will understand how the agricultural response to the Great Depression fueled the already dire ecological situation in the Great Plains, leading to the Dust Bowl. 

About the Author:

Eden McCauslin is a Social Studies and English teacher in Chicago Public Schools. Eden previously taught in the District of Columbia Public Schools



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: Seabiscuit - Stock Market Crash of 1929
URL: https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/usPdM-J-4R0?autoplay=1&iv_load_policy=3&loop=1&modestbranding=1&playlist=usPdM-J-4R0
Description:

The narrator in the clip explains the impact of the stock market crash on the United States economy: millions of individuals lost their hard-earned savings and unemployment rose to 25%. As a result, millions of families had to change the way they lived in order to survive. This new way of life was noticeably less comfortable than their old way of life.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: John Steinbeck - Nobel Prize Author | Mini Bio | BIO
URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3irviknt-fg
Description:

This video is a short biography of John Steinbeck, an influential 20th-century author best known for works such as Of Mice and Men and The Grapes of Wrath. He is one of the most famous writers of the "Lost Generation," people who came of age during or shortly after the first World War and became disillusioned by the senseless death and destruction.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

[SS2010] US11 (11) 7 :
7 ) Explain strengths and weaknesses of the New Deal in managing problems of the Great Depression through relief, recovery, and reform programs, including the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Works Progress Administration (WPA), the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), and the Social Security Act. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Analyzing conditions created by the Dust Bowl for their impact on migration patterns during the Great Depression
Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: The Dust Bowl/Lessons/PBS
URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7Uwg8BT6qQ
Description:

Following the Dust Bowl catastrophe, greater amounts of land became dedicated to wheat production and local inhabitants believed the Dust Bowl was behind them. However, in the 1950s, symptoms of relapse were looming. Luckily, many farmers used Howard Finnell's conservation practices; therefore, the catastrophe was averted.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: The Great Depression/Crash Course US History #33
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/fd6ec9b2-c160-4073-a62c-4d5f5e1b6562/the-great-depression-crash-course-us-history-33/
Description:

In this video from PBSLearningMedia, John Green teaches students about the Great Depression. So, everybody knows that the Great Depression started with the stock market crash in 1929, right? Not exactly. The Depression happened after the stock market crash but wasn't caused by the crash. John will teach you about how the Depression started, what Herbert Hoover tried to do to fix it, and why those efforts failed.

**Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: Up From the Dust
URL: https://www.mission-us.org/pages/landing-mission-5
Description:

In this interactive game from WNET Thirteen, “Up from the Dust,” players take on the roles of twins Frank and Ginny Dunn, whose family wheat farm is devastated by the Great Depression and Dust Bowl. As they experience the hardships of the 1930s, players learn about Americans’ strategies for survival – as individuals, communities, and a nation. “Up from the Dust” is available online and as free iPad and Windows 10 apps. Teachers need to register for a free account. This game can be played in a whole group or individually. Teachers can download an educator's guide.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

Subject: Social Studies (11)
Title: The Great Depression
URL: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/us-history/rise-to-world-power/great-depression/a/the-great-depression
Description:
This article from Khan Academy gives an overview of the Great Depression which was the worst economic downturn in US history. It began in 1929 and did not abate until the end of the 1930s. The stock market crash of October 1929 signaled the beginning of the Great Depression. By 1933, unemployment was at 25 percent and more than 5,000 banks had gone out of business. Although President Herbert Hoover attempted to spark growth in the economy through measures like the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, these measures did little to solve the crisis. Franklin Roosevelt was elected president in November 1932. Inaugurated as president in March 1933, Roosevelt’s New Deal offered a new approach to the Great Depression. This article can be used during a lesson on the Great Depression and includes assessment questions at the end for students to answer.  Students can read the article in a whole group or individually. It can also be assigned through Google Classroom.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS6 (6) 5 :
5 ) Explain causes and effects of the Great Depression on the people of the United States.

Examples: economic failure, loss of farms, rising unemployment, building of Hoovervilles

•  Identifying patterns of migration during the Great Depression
•  Locating on a map the area of the United States known as the Dust Bowl
•  Describing the importance of the election of Franklin D. Roosevelt as President of the United States, including the New Deal alphabet agencies
•  Locating on a map the river systems utilized by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (Alabama)
[SS2010] US11 (11) 6 :
6 ) Describe social and economic conditions from the 1920s through the Great Depression regarding factors leading to a deepening crisis, including the collapse of the farming economy and the stock market crash of 1929. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.d., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.j., A.1.k.]

•  Assessing effects of overproduction, stock market speculation, and restrictive monetary policies on the pending economic crisis
•  Describing the impact of the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act on the global economy and the resulting worldwide depression
•  Identifying notable authors of the 1920s, including John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, and Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)
•  Analyzing the Great Depression for its impact on the American family
Examples: Bonus Army, Hoovervilles, Dust Bowl, Dorothea Lange

Subject: Social Studies (6 - 11)
Title: Exploration of the Great Depression in Of Mice and Men
URL: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/exploration-of-the-great-depression-in-of-mice-and-men/mAjzdULa5FbBF9C0#r
Description:

This is a lesson plan that uses the book Of Mice and Men when teaching about the Great Depression. The collection includes photos and articles detailing the causes and effects of the Great Depression.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 11

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