ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (2) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (2) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (8)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

Subject: Science (1)
Title: Light, Can't you See? Investigating Materials that Allow Light to Pass through Them
Description:

Students will work in small groups to conduct a hands-on investigation to see what materials allow light to pass through. They will label materials as opaque, translucent, and transparent. They will operate solar panels and place different materials between the sun and the panel.  The panel is attached to a fan which will stop, continue spinning or slow down depending on the material. Learners will record their findings in chart form.

This lesson was created as part of the 2016 NASA STEM Standards of Practice Project, a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

Subject: Science (1)
Title: Peekaboo, I See You: A Lesson on How Light Passes Through an Object
Description:

Students will use transparent, translucent, opaque, and reflective items that they find around the classroom or school to investigate how light passes through an object. This activity will demonstrate how light behaves around objects. The first investigation will take students on a scavenger hunt to find objects that fit each type.  Students will classify each object using a flashlight and analyzing how light passes through the object. Then the final investigation will allow students to experiment with how the amount of light that each type allow effects the rate at which ice will melt.

This lesson results from a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

[ARTS] VISA (1) 3 :
3) Develop skills by following a sequence of steps to create works of art on subjects that are real or imaginary.

Example: The teacher will model an artistic technique.

Subject: Science (1), Arts Education (1)
Title: Lego Shadow Art
Description:

This is a STEAM activity that allows students to reinforce their knowledge of materials that allow and do not allow light to pass through an object. The students will build an opaque Lego tower and use its shadow to create a piece of artwork.

This activity results from the ALEX Resource Gap Project.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

Subject: Science (1), Arts Education (1)
Title: Out of this World Suncatchers
Description:

This is an art activity to reinforce which materials allow light to pass through. This activity should be completed after teaching a lesson on opaque, translucent, and transparent. Students can complete this project individually, with a partner, or in a group.

This activity was created as a result of the Arts COS Resource Development Summit.




ALEX Learning Activities: 2

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

Subject: Science (1)
Title: A Thing or 2 about Making Shade | The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/a-thing-or-2-making-shade/the-cat-in-the-hat-knows-a-lot-about-that/
Description:

This short video from The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!, teaches about physical science, energy, and light. Thing 1 tries clear, tinted, and opaque glass, to create a shade for Thing 2. He decides that opaque glass provides the best shade and relief from the sun.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 2 :
2 ) Construct explanations from observations that objects can be seen only when light is available to illuminate them (e.g., moon being illuminated by the sun, colors and patterns in a kaleidoscope being illuminated when held toward a light).

[SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

[SC2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

a. Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways (e.g., rubbing hands together, burning leaves) and can move from one object to another by conduction.

b. Demonstrate that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.

c. Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop through which an electric current can pass.

[SC2015] (4) 8 :
8 ) Construct a model to explain that an object can be seen when light reflected from its surface enters the eyes.

[SC2015] PS8 (8) 18 :
18 ) Use models to demonstrate how light and sound waves differ in how they are absorbed, reflected, and transmitted through different types of media.

Subject: Science (1 - 8)
Title: Light StudyJam
URL: https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/energy-light-sound/light.htm
Description:

Light is a very important energy source that keeps us warm and lets us see the world. Light travels in waves in bundles of energy called photons. Those photons contain all seven colors in the rainbow. Grab a prism and check them out!

The classroom resource provides a video that describes light, how it moves, and how it helps us see. This resource can provide background information for students before they construct their own models and carry out their own investigations. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 2 :
2 ) Construct explanations from observations that objects can be seen only when light is available to illuminate them (e.g., moon being illuminated by the sun, colors and patterns in a kaleidoscope being illuminated when held toward a light).

[SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

[SC2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

a. Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways (e.g., rubbing hands together, burning leaves) and can move from one object to another by conduction.

b. Demonstrate that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.

c. Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop through which an electric current can pass.

[SC2015] (4) 8 :
8 ) Construct a model to explain that an object can be seen when light reflected from its surface enters the eyes.

[SC2015] PS8 (8) 18 :
18 ) Use models to demonstrate how light and sound waves differ in how they are absorbed, reflected, and transmitted through different types of media.

Subject: Science (1 - 8)
Title: Light Absorption, Reflection, & Refraction StudyJam
URL: https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/energy-light-sound/light-absorb-reflect-refract.htm
Description:

Light always travels in a straight line until something gets in its way. When that happens, light can be absorbed, reflected (bounced off), or refracted (bent), depending on what kind of surface it hits.

The classroom resource provides a video that will explain how light can move on and through different surfaces. This resource can provide background information for students before they create their own models or conduct their own investigations. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 1 :
1 ) Investigate the resulting motion of objects when forces of different strengths and directions act upon them (e.g., object being pushed, object being pulled, two objects colliding).

[SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

[SC2015] (2) 5 :
5 ) Plan and carry out an investigation, using one variable at a time (e.g., water, light, soil, air), to determine the growth needs of plants.

[SC2015] (3) 2 :
2 ) Investigate, measure, and communicate in a graphical format how an observed pattern of motion (e.g., a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, two children teetering on a see-saw, a model vehicle rolling down a ramp of varying heights, a pendulum swinging) can be used to predict the future motion of an object.

[SC2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

a. Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways (e.g., rubbing hands together, burning leaves) and can move from one object to another by conduction.

b. Demonstrate that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.

c. Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop through which an electric current can pass.

[SC2015] (5) 2 :
2 ) Investigate matter to provide mathematical evidence, including graphs, to show that regardless of the type of reaction (e.g., new substance forming due to dissolving or mixing) or change (e.g., phase change) that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of the matter is conserved.

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 8 :
8 ) Plan and carry out investigations that demonstrate the chemical and physical processes that form rocks and cycle Earth's materials (e.g., processes of crystallization, heating and cooling, weathering, deformation, and sedimentation).

Subject: Science (K - 6)
Title: Scientific Theory & Evidence StudyJam
URL: https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/scientific-inquiry/scientific-theory-and-evid.htm
Description:

A scientific theory is a proposed description, explanation, or model of something occurring in nature. These theories have to be testable so that scientists can use the scientific method to see if they work.

The classroom resource provides a video that will introduce students to the scientific method, developing hypotheses, and collecting evidence. There is a karaoke song that students can learn to help them remember the steps in the scientific method. Students can use the information presented in this video to follow the scientific method as they plan their own investigations. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 1 :
1 ) Investigate the resulting motion of objects when forces of different strengths and directions act upon them (e.g., object being pushed, object being pulled, two objects colliding).

[SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

[SC2015] (3) 2 :
2 ) Investigate, measure, and communicate in a graphical format how an observed pattern of motion (e.g., a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, two children teetering on a see-saw, a model vehicle rolling down a ramp of varying heights, a pendulum swinging) can be used to predict the future motion of an object.

[SC2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

a. Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways (e.g., rubbing hands together, burning leaves) and can move from one object to another by conduction.

b. Demonstrate that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.

c. Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop through which an electric current can pass.

[SC2015] (5) 2 :
2 ) Investigate matter to provide mathematical evidence, including graphs, to show that regardless of the type of reaction (e.g., new substance forming due to dissolving or mixing) or change (e.g., phase change) that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of the matter is conserved.

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 8 :
8 ) Plan and carry out investigations that demonstrate the chemical and physical processes that form rocks and cycle Earth's materials (e.g., processes of crystallization, heating and cooling, weathering, deformation, and sedimentation).

Subject: Science (K - 6)
Title: Scientific Methods StudyJam
URL: https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/scientific-inquiry/scientific-methods.htm
Description:

Scientists are always working to better understand the world. They use the scientific method to help them. The scientific method includes making observations, developing hypotheses, designing experiments, collecting data, and then drawing conclusions.

The classroom resource provides a video that will introduce students to the scientific method and experimentation. There is a karaoke song that students can learn to help them remember the steps in the scientific method. Students can use the information presented in this video to follow the scientific method as they plan their own investigations. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 1 :
1 ) Investigate the resulting motion of objects when forces of different strengths and directions act upon them (e.g., object being pushed, object being pulled, two objects colliding).

[SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

[SC2015] (2) 5 :
5 ) Plan and carry out an investigation, using one variable at a time (e.g., water, light, soil, air), to determine the growth needs of plants.

[SC2015] (3) 2 :
2 ) Investigate, measure, and communicate in a graphical format how an observed pattern of motion (e.g., a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, two children teetering on a see-saw, a model vehicle rolling down a ramp of varying heights, a pendulum swinging) can be used to predict the future motion of an object.

[SC2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

a. Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways (e.g., rubbing hands together, burning leaves) and can move from one object to another by conduction.

b. Demonstrate that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.

c. Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop through which an electric current can pass.

[SC2015] (5) 2 :
2 ) Investigate matter to provide mathematical evidence, including graphs, to show that regardless of the type of reaction (e.g., new substance forming due to dissolving or mixing) or change (e.g., phase change) that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of the matter is conserved.

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 8 :
8 ) Plan and carry out investigations that demonstrate the chemical and physical processes that form rocks and cycle Earth's materials (e.g., processes of crystallization, heating and cooling, weathering, deformation, and sedimentation).

Subject: Science (K - 6)
Title: Investigations to Collect Data StudyJam
URL: https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/scientific-inquiry/collect-data.htm
Description:

When scientists conduct experiments, they collect data through observation and measurement. There are many different ways to measure data, but they all help ensure that scientists can collect accurate information.

The classroom resource provides a karaoke song that will describe how scientists collect data as they experiment. Students can use the information presented in this audio resource as they plan their own investigations. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 2 :
2 ) Construct explanations from observations that objects can be seen only when light is available to illuminate them (e.g., moon being illuminated by the sun, colors and patterns in a kaleidoscope being illuminated when held toward a light).

[SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

Subject: Science (1)
Title: Shadow Shapes Game
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/buack2-sci-shadowshapes/shadow-shapes/
Description:

Children move an object in front of a flashlight and observe how its shadow changes in this interactive game from PEEP and the Big Wide World. As children slide the object closer to and farther away from the light until its shadow matches the size of the object’s outline on the wall, they discover that when an object is moved closer to the light source, it blocks more light and its shadow becomes larger. Children also explore how changing the position of the light changes the direction in which the shadow of the object falls.

To view the Activity, Student Handout, and Teaching Tips for this interactive game, go to Support Materials. This resource was developed through WGBH’s Bringing the Universe to America’s Classrooms project, in collaboration with NASA.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (1) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. [RI.1.1]

[SC2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

Subject: English Language Arts (1), Science (1)
Title: Light
URL: https://www.readworks.org/article/Light/47163b5a-415e-417d-aa1e-d16f90071f66#!articleTab:content/
Description:

The teacher will present an informational text from the website, ReadWorks. The students and teacher can interact with this non-fiction text by annotating the text digitally. The students will answer the questions associated with the article as an assessment. This learning activity can be used as an introduction to transparent, translucent, opaque, and reflective materials, serve as reinforcement after students have already learned these concepts, or be used as an assessment at the conclusion of a lesson. This informational text could provide background knowledge before students investigate materials that are transparent, translucent, opaque, or reflective. 



ALEX Classroom Resources: 8

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