ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (2) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (4)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2019] (1) 19 :
19. Tell and write time to the hours and half hours using analog and digital clocks.
[MA2019] (1) 16 :
16. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories.

a. Ask and answer questions about the total number of data points in organized data.

b. Summarize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.

c. Determine "how many" in each category using up to three categories of data.

d. Determine "how many more" or "how many less" are in one category than in another using data organized into two or three categories.
[SC2015] (1) 9 :
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

Subject: Mathematics (1), or Science (1)
Title: The Changing Sun
Description:

Students will observe the changes of the sun over the course of a day and then over a 4 month period. Students will document these changes and then graph them. Finally, students will see the relationship between the patterns of the sun and the effect the pattern has on our daily lives. 

This lesson was created as part of the 2016 NASA STEM Standards of Practice Project, a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 9 :
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

[SC2015] (1) 8 :
8 ) Observe, describe, and predict patterns of the sun, moon, and stars as they appear in the sky (e.g., sun and moon appearing to rise in one part of the sky, move across the sky, and set; stars other than our sun being visible at night, but not during the day).

[SC2015] (1) 2 :
2 ) Construct explanations from observations that objects can be seen only when light is available to illuminate them (e.g., moon being illuminated by the sun, colors and patterns in a kaleidoscope being illuminated when held toward a light).

Subject: Science (1)
Title: Can you catch your shadow?
Description:

This is an interdisciplinary lesson about shadows and light where we track the motion of the sun across the sky. It involves components of sunrise, sunset, involving Mathematics, Science, and English Language Arts. This lesson will involve NASA resources, hands- on inquiry, and observational data.

This lesson was created as part of the 2016 NASA STEM Standards of Practice Project, a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 21 :
15) Interpret data displayed in a chart.

Example: Using charts which depict data students interpret the data either verbally or in written form (which has more, less, are equal).

[MA2019] (1) 16 :
16. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories.

a. Ask and answer questions about the total number of data points in organized data.

b. Summarize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.

c. Determine "how many" in each category using up to three categories of data.

d. Determine "how many more" or "how many less" are in one category than in another using data organized into two or three categories.
[SC2015] (1) 9 :
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

[DLIT] (1) 20 :
14) Discuss the purpose of collecting and organizing data.

[DLIT] (1) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (1) 7 :
1) Classify and sort information into logical order with and without a computer.

Examples: Sort by shape, color, or other attribute; sort A-Z.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1), Mathematics (1), Science (1)
Title: Not Enough Hours in the Day? Daylight Data Collection
Description:

Students and teacher collaboratively collect and organize data on the length of days throughout the year and analyze patterns that they see. Students and teacher will create a digital spreadsheet and a connected chart in order to reflect and make observations while analyzing the data represented in chart format.

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS COS Resource Development Summit.




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 8 :
8 ) Observe, describe, and predict patterns of the sun, moon, and stars as they appear in the sky (e.g., sun and moon appearing to rise in one part of the sky, move across the sky, and set; stars other than our sun being visible at night, but not during the day).

[SC2015] (1) 9 :
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

Subject: Science (1)
Title: Our Super Star
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ess05.sci.ess.eiu.lp_superstar/our-super-star/
Description:

Our star, the Sun, is an ordinary star. It is not particularly special compared to other stars in the universe; however, it is crucially important to us. As the massive energy source at the center of our solar system, the Sun is responsible for Earth's climate, weather, and life. In this lesson, students use observations, activities, and videos to learn basic facts about the Sun. Students also model the mechanics of day and night and use solar energy to make a tasty treat.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 9 :
9 ) Observe, record, and share findings of local weather patterns over a period of time (e.g., increase in daily temperature from morning to afternoon, typical rain and storm patterns from season to season).

[SC2015] (1) 9 :
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

Subject: Science (K - 1)
Title: Seasons
URL: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/idea/seasons/
Description:

This resource is a list of teaching ideas for activities to teach your students about the seasons. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (1) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. [RI.1.1]

[SC2015] (1) 9 :
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

Subject: English Language Arts (1), Science (1)
Title: Sunrise, Sunset
URL: https://www.readworks.org/article/Sunrise-Sunset/c47218d8-6f93-45b2-aed0-183483b4cd73#!articleTab:content/
Description:

The teacher will present an informational text from the website, ReadWorks. The students and teacher can interact with this non-fiction text by annotating the text digitally. The students will answer the questions associated with the article as an assessment. This learning activity can be used as an introduction to seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset, serve as reinforcement after students have already learned this concept, or be used as an assessment at the conclusion of a lesson.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (1) 8 :
8 ) Observe, describe, and predict patterns of the sun, moon, and stars as they appear in the sky (e.g., sun and moon appearing to rise in one part of the sky, move across the sky, and set; stars other than our sun being visible at night, but not during the day).

[SC2015] (1) 9 :
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

Subject: Science (1)
Title: Sky 3: Modeling Shadows
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/sky-3-modeling-shadows/
Description:

In this lesson, students will construct models to demonstrate their understanding of shadows. Student groups will make a three-dimensional model of the neighborhood after reading Bear Shadow by Frank Asch. They will track the sun shadows in the neighborhood. You will want to measure the sun shadows with students at least twice, and perhaps three or four times during the year, to see how they vary with the time of year. This lesson is part of a four-lesson series in which students observe the daytime and nighttime sky regularly to identify sequences of changes and to look for patterns in these changes.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 4

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