ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (2) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (12)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 1 :
1 ) Conduct an investigation to describe and classify various substances according to physical properties (e.g., milk being a liquid, not clear in color, assuming shape of its container, mixing with water; mineral oil being a liquid, clear in color, taking shape of its container, floating in water; a brick being a solid, not clear in color, rough in texture, not taking the shape of its container, sinking in water).

[SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Subject: Science (2)
Title: Making Matter Change: Microwave Mug Cake
Description:

The lesson will begin with students comparing and contrasting the physical properties of ice and water using a Venn diagram graphic organizer. Next, the students will describe the physical properties of ingredients needed for a microwave mug cake. The students will bake a chocolate microwave mug cake to demonstrate that some changes in matter caused by heating and cooling are irreversible. Lastly, the students will create a written and pictorial response comparing the water and ice to the microwave mug cake to provide evidence that some changes in matter can be reversed, while others can not.

This lesson results from the ALEX Resource Gap Project.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

[SC2015] (2) 10 :
10 ) Collect and evaluate data to identify water found on Earth and determine whether it is a solid or a liquid (e.g., glaciers as solid forms of water; oceans, lakes, rivers, streams as liquid forms of water).

[MA2019] (2) 16 :
16. Create a picture graph and bar graph to represent data with up to four categories.

a. Using information presented in a bar graph, solve simple "put-together," "take-apart," and "compare" problems.

b. Using Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts, analyze data to predict an outcome.
[MA2019] (2) 1 :
1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
Subject: Mathematics (2), or Science (2)
Title: Whoa! Where'd It Go? (States of Matter Data Collection)
Description:

This lesson allows students to use the properties and characteristics of solids, liquids, and gases to determine how different variables affect states of matter.  Students predict what will happen and spend short amounts of time daily to observe and record data.  Students will graph their data into charts to see patterns and solve math problems. 

This lesson was created as a part of the 2016 NASA STEM Standards of Practice Project, a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

[SC2015] (2) 1 :
1 ) Conduct an investigation to describe and classify various substances according to physical properties (e.g., milk being a liquid, not clear in color, assuming shape of its container, mixing with water; mineral oil being a liquid, clear in color, taking shape of its container, floating in water; a brick being a solid, not clear in color, rough in texture, not taking the shape of its container, sinking in water).

[DLIT] (2) 7 :
1) Create and sort information into useful order using digital tools.

Examples: Sort data spreadsheets A-Z, simple filters, and tables.

[DLIT] (2) 20 :
14) Collect, create, and organize data in a digital chart or graph.

Subject: Science (2), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: What's the Matter? Solid, liquid, or gas?
Description:

This digital tool is an interactive way to experiment with solids, liquids, and gases. Students are challenged to find the correct category for other examples such as milk, sand, rain, helium, wood and air. Watch what happens when you heat liquids and cool gases.




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 1 :
1 ) Conduct an investigation to describe and classify various substances according to physical properties (e.g., milk being a liquid, not clear in color, assuming shape of its container, mixing with water; mineral oil being a liquid, clear in color, taking shape of its container, floating in water; a brick being a solid, not clear in color, rough in texture, not taking the shape of its container, sinking in water).

[SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Subject: Science (2)
Title: Solid or Liquid | Hero Elementary™
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/solid-or-liquid-media-gallery/hero-elementary/
Description:

In these Hero Elementary activities, children explore solid and liquid materials. They observe, compare, and describe solid and liquid materials. They sort materials as solid or liquid. They find out how hot and cold can change the state of materials.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Subject: Science (2)
Title: Heating and Cooling | Hero Elementary™
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/heating-and-cooling-media-gallery/hero-elementary/
Description:

In these Hero Elementary activities, children explore how materials change when heated and cooled. For example, if you cool a liquid, it may become solid. What happens when you reverse the process and heat the solid—does it become liquid again? Or, if you heat a solid, it may become liquid. If you cool the liquid, will it get solid again? Children will discover that some changes are reversible and others are not. You can heat ice and it becomes liquid water. If you cool the water, it freezes and becomes ice again. If you heat popcorn, it pops and it does not “unpop” if you cool it. There is no way to unpop popcorn.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Subject: Science (2)
Title: Ruff's Cookie Creator - Game | The Ruff Ruffman Show
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ruffruffman-sci-cookiecreator/ruffs-cookie-creator/
Description:

Use science inquiry to explore and test different ingredients to help Ruff make, decorate, and serve cookies to his family in this kitchen science game from The Ruff Ruffman Show. Students will explore how changes to substances are sometimes irreversible. 

This resource is part of The Ruff Ruffman Show Science Collection.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RI.2.1]

[SC2015] (2) 1 :
1 ) Conduct an investigation to describe and classify various substances according to physical properties (e.g., milk being a liquid, not clear in color, assuming shape of its container, mixing with water; mineral oil being a liquid, clear in color, taking shape of its container, floating in water; a brick being a solid, not clear in color, rough in texture, not taking the shape of its container, sinking in water).

[SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Subject: English Language Arts (2), Science (2)
Title: States of Matter | States of Water
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/reach-with-stem-states-of-matter-states-of-water/states-of-water/
Description:

Experiments are cool with a curious baby polar bear and his who, what, when, where, and why questions about the three states of matter. In this interactive lesson, students get hands-on with ice and record their observations through drawing and writing.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 14 :
14 ) Know and use various text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently. [RI.2.5]

[SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

[SC2015] (2) 7 :
7 ) Obtain information from literature and other media to illustrate that there are many different kinds of living things and that they exist in different places on land and in water (e.g., woodland, tundra, desert, rainforest, ocean, river).

Subject: English Language Arts (2), Science (2)
Title: Hot Water | Cold Water!
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/reach-with-stem-hot-water-cold-water/hot-water-cold-water/
Description:

Use text features like captions, bold print, glossary, and index to learn about the hot and cold states of water and all about penguins. Students will read an informational text on what makes water freeze, look at cool penguin pictures, learn weird penguin names, and read how penguins enjoy the water in all of its states.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

[SC2015] (5) 2 :
2 ) Investigate matter to provide mathematical evidence, including graphs, to show that regardless of the type of reaction (e.g., new substance forming due to dissolving or mixing) or change (e.g., phase change) that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of the matter is conserved.

Subject: Science (2 - 5)
Title: Physical & Chemical Changes of Matter StudyJam
URL: https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/matter/changes-of-matter.htm
Description:

Physical changes mean matter changes size or shape, not its atomic makeup. Chemical and nuclear changes alter matter on an atomic level.

The classroom resource provides a video that will explain the difference between physical and chemical changes of matter. This resource can provide background information for students before they conduct their own investigations. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

[SC2015] (5) 3 :
3 ) Examine matter through observations and measurements to identify materials (e.g., powders, metals, minerals, liquids) based on their properties (e.g., color, hardness, reflectivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, response to magnetic forces, solubility, density).

[SC2015] (5) 4 :
4 ) Investigate whether the mixing of two or more substances results in new substances (e.g., mixing of baking soda and vinegar resulting in the formation of a new substance, gas; mixing of sand and water resulting in no new substance being formed).

Subject: Science (2 - 5)
Title: Acids and Bases StudyJam
URL: https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/matter/acids-and-bases.htm
Description:

An object’s pH level can be tested using indicators. Objects with a low pH are acids, and those with a high pH are bases. Acids and bases react together to form water and salt.

The classroom resource provides a video that will introduce students to pH levels, acids, bases, and their possible reactions. This resource can provide background information for students before they conduct their own investigations. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (2) 10 :
10 ) Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. [RI.2.1]

[ELA2015] (2) 11 :
11 ) Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text. [RI.2.2]

[SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Subject: English Language Arts (2), Science (2)
Title: Water Takes Three Forms
URL: https://www.readworks.org/article/Water-Takes-Three-Forms/bd2f6e6a-06c6-4273-8692-094ee2e5273e#!articleTab:content/
Description:

The teacher will present an informational text from the website, ReadWorks. The students and teacher can interact with this non-fiction text by annotating the text digitally. The students will answer the questions associated with the article as an assessment. This learning activity can be used to introduce students to the changes caused by heating or cooling water, serve as reinforcement after students have already learned this concept, or be used as an assessment at the conclusion of a lesson. This article will provide evidence to students that the physical changes caused by heating and cooling water can be reversed. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Subject: Science (2)
Title: Water 1: Water and Ice
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/water-1-water-and-ice/
Description:

This lesson is the first in a three-part series that addresses a concept that is central to the understanding of the water cycle—that water is able to take many forms but is still water. In this lesson, students explore how water can change from a solid to a liquid and then back again.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Subject: Science (2)
Title: Water 2: Disappearing Water
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/water-2-disappearing-water/
Description:

Students will observe the amount of water in an open container over time, and they will observe the amount of water in a closed container over time. Students will compare and contrast the sets of observations over time. This lesson is the second in a three-part series that addresses a concept that is central to the understanding of the water cycle—that water is able to take many forms but is still water. In this second lesson, students will focus on the concept that water can go back and forth from one form to another and the amount of water will remain the same. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (2) 4 :
4 ) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Subject: Science (2)
Title: Water 3: Melting and Freezing
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/water-3-melting-and-freezing/
Description:

In this lesson, students will explore what happens to the amount of different substances as they change from a solid to a liquid or a liquid to solid. This lesson is the third in a three-part series that addresses a concept that is central to the understanding of the water cycle—that water is able to take many forms but is still water. In this lesson, students will investigate how melting and freezing impact three everyday items: water, chocolate, and margarine.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 11

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