ALEX Resources

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Lesson Plans (2) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (2) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (9)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Subject: Science (3)
Title: Optimal Snow Sled Experience
Description:

Students will determine the difference between balanced and unbalanced forces through an experiment. The experiment consists of a student-created scaled snow sled model going down a teacher-created ramp. Students will plan to change one variable, collect data, and chart the data graphically. Students will change a variable such as: number of students riding the snow sled, size of the child (children) riding the snow sled, direction, position on the hill the snow sled is released, position of children on the sled (sitting, standing, laying), friction caused by materials that makes up the sled, and air resistance caused by an object such as a parachute. Students will collect and chart data of each experiment graphically in order to determine the longest snow sled ride.

This lesson results from the ALEX Resource Gap Project.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

[SC2015] (3) 3 :
3 ) Explore objects that can be manipulated in order to determine cause-and-effect relationships (e.g., distance between objects affecting strength of a force, orientation of magnets affecting direction of a magnetic force) of electric interactions between two objects not in contact with one another (e.g., force on hair from an electrically charged balloon, electrical forces between a charged rod and pieces of paper) or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with one another (e.g., force between two permanent magnets or between an electromagnet and steel paperclips, force exerted by one magnet versus the force exerted by two magnets).

[SC2015] (4) 1 :
1 ) Use evidence to explain the relationship of the speed of an object to the energy of that object.

[SC2015] (4) 3 :
3 ) Investigate to determine changes in energy resulting from increases or decreases in speed that occur when objects collide.

[SC2015] (5) 6 :
6 ) Construct an explanation from evidence to illustrate that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed downward towards the center of Earth.

[SC2015] (5) 7 :
7 ) Design and conduct a test to modify the speed of a falling object due to gravity (e.g., constructing a parachute to keep an attached object from breaking).*

Subject: Science (3 - 5)
Title: Marble Coaster
Description:

This lesson is adapted from a lesson entitled, "Marble Run", from the NASA Education Guide Amusement Park Physics with a NASA Twist.

Students will explore the effects of force, speed, motion, and gravity in creating a roller coaster track for a marble.

This lesson was created as part of the 2016 NASA STEM Standards of Practice Project, a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (3) 2 :
2) Demonstrate skills using available resources, tools, and technologies to investigate personal ideas through the art-making process.

Examples: Choose from a variety of resources and materials to create a work of art.
Use books Imagine That by Joyce Raymond or Dinner at Magritte's by Michael Garland.

[SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Subject: Arts Education (3), Science (3)
Title: An Exploration of Balance with Alexander Calder
Description:

Students will construct hanging mobiles in the style of Alexander Calder using coat hangers and assorted materials while exploring the principles of balanced and unbalanced forces.

This activity was created as a result of the Arts COS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Subject: Science (3)
Title: How Far Will It Go?
Description:

The Forces in Action interactive simulator utilizes a truck,  a sloped track, weights and parachutes to allow students to conduct an investigation of how the forces of friction, gravity, and mass impact the distance the truck will travel. The students follow the directions at the top of the activity window to explore the different activities utilizing parachutes for friction, weights for mass, and slope for gravity.

The students record the distance for each run the truck makes down the track, with the different objects in and on the truck, in the included results table. The students will analyze and interpret the data from their table and share the results with the class.




ALEX Learning Activities: 2

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 1 :
1 ) Investigate the resulting motion of objects when forces of different strengths and directions act upon them (e.g., object being pushed, object being pulled, two objects colliding).

[SC2015] (0) 2 :
2 ) Use observations and data from investigations to determine if a design solution (e.g., designing a ramp to increase the speed of an object in order to move a stationary object) solves the problem of using force to change the speed or direction of an object.*

[SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Subject: Science (K - 3)
Title: Slidea-ma-Zoo | The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/slidea-ma-zoo/the-cat-in-the-hat-knows-a-lot-about-that/
Description:

Introduce your children to the concepts of physical science, specifically motion and stability: forces and interactions with this game from The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That! Nick and Sally are testing out the newest slides in Frictionarium. By changing a slide's height and texture, kids will engage in cause and effect as they race with Thing 1 and Thing 2.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 19 :
19 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the Grades 2-3 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RI.3.10]

[ELA2015] (3) 23 :
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.3.2]

a. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.3.2a]

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details. [W.3.2b]

c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information. [W.3.2c]

d. Provide a concluding statement or section. [W.3.2d]

[SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Subject: English Language Arts (3), Science (3)
Title: Motion!
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/reach-with-stem-motion/motion/
Description:

Beware of squirrels! Experience the science of force and motion while learning that an author’s reason to write is either to inform or entertain the reader. In this interactive lesson, write a motion story and use motion words as you practice reading with a nutty squirrel.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 1 :
1 ) Investigate the resulting motion of objects when forces of different strengths and directions act upon them (e.g., object being pushed, object being pulled, two objects colliding).

[SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Subject: Science (K - 3)
Title: Force & Motion StudyJam
URL: https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/forces-and-motion/force-and-motion.htm
Description:

Anytime there is a change in motion, force is the responsible party. It has to overcome inertia to act on an object. Inertia keeps an object either sitting still or moving at a constant speed.

The classroom resource provides a video that will introduce the concepts of force, motion, and inertia. This resource can provide background information for students before they conduct their own investigations. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 14 :
14 ) Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently. [RI.3.5]

[SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Subject: English Language Arts (3), Science (3)
Title: Falling for Gravity!
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/falling-for-gravity-reach-with-stem/falling-for-gravity/
Description:

May the force be with you as you learn about using text features (like captions, bold print, subheadings, icons, and glossaries) to find facts about the force known as gravity! A big silly walrus will travel with you through this lesson.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 1 :
1 ) Investigate the resulting motion of objects when forces of different strengths and directions act upon them (e.g., object being pushed, object being pulled, two objects colliding).

[SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Subject: Science (K - 3)
Title: Hamster Run - Game | The Ruff Ruffman Show
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ruffruffman-sci-hamsterrun/hamster-run/
Description:

Use this game from The Ruff Ruffman Show to help children learn motion and stability: forces and interactions through physical science. Use the engineering design process to build, test, and redesign structures to help the hungry hamsters reach their food.

This resource is part of The Ruff Ruffman Show Science Collection.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (3) 12 :
12 ) Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause and effect. [RI.3.3]

[ELA2015] (3) 18 :
18 ) Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic. [RI.3.9]

[SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Subject: English Language Arts (3), Science (3)
Title: Friction Circus!
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/reach-with-stem-friction-circus/friction-circus/
Description:

In this interactive lesson, students will learn that life without friction is a 3-ring circus and an accident waiting to happen. A circus dog with lots of tricks will help you learn about compare and contrast, cause and effect, and the importance of friction.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (3) 1 :
1 ) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Subject: Science (3)
Title: Gearing Up With Robots
URL: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/activity/gearing-robots/
Description:

In this activity, students experiment with gear motion to understand how gears work to change the amount of force, speed, or direction of motion in machines.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 7

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