ALEX Resources

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Lesson Plans (1) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Classroom Resources (3)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] ES6 (6) 4 :
4 ) Construct explanations from geologic evidence (e.g., change or extinction of particular living organisms; field evidence or representations, including models of geologic cross-sections; sedimentary layering) to identify patterns of Earth's major historical events (e.g., formation of mountain chains and ocean basins, significant volcanic eruptions, fossilization, folding, faulting, igneous intrusion, erosion).

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 6 :
6 ) Provide evidence from data of the distribution of fossils and rocks, continental shapes, and seafloor structures to explain past plate motions.

Subject: Science (6)
Title: Plate Tectonics: Slip, Slidin' Away
Description:

This lesson is the second of a three-part unit on plate tectonics, which includes hands-on, inquiry-based activities. Students will use a hard-boiled egg to model Earth’s tectonic plates and interior layers. In addition, students will various edible materials to model the movement of tectonic plates at the different types of plate boundaries.




ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] ES6 (6) 4 :
4 ) Construct explanations from geologic evidence (e.g., change or extinction of particular living organisms; field evidence or representations, including models of geologic cross-sections; sedimentary layering) to identify patterns of Earth's major historical events (e.g., formation of mountain chains and ocean basins, significant volcanic eruptions, fossilization, folding, faulting, igneous intrusion, erosion).

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 5 :
5 ) Use evidence to explain how different geologic processes shape Earth's history over widely varying scales of space and time (e.g., chemical and physical erosion; tectonic plate processes; volcanic eruptions; meteor impacts; regional geographical features, including Alabama fault lines, Rickwood Caverns, and Wetumpka Impact Crater).

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 9 :
9 ) Use models to explain how the flow of Earth's internal energy drives a cycling of matter between Earth's surface and deep interior causing plate movements (e.g., mid-ocean ridges, ocean trenches, volcanoes, earthquakes, mountains, rift valleys, volcanic islands).

Subject: Science (6)
Title: Volcanoes StudyJam
URL: https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/rocks-minerals-landforms/volcanoes.htm
Description:
What are the Earth’s most fantastic, and sometimes most violent, geologic changes? Here is a hint: molten rock and ash shooting out of them!

Volcanoes produce some of the Earth's most violent geologic changes, but they are not always violent. Different kinds of volcanoes, including shield, cinder cone, composite, and ashflow caldera, produce different kinds of eruptions.

The classroom resource provides a video that will describe the different varieties of volcanoes and how their eruptions cause changes to Earth's surface. This resource will provide background information to students before they create their own models. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] ES6 (6) 4 :
4 ) Construct explanations from geologic evidence (e.g., change or extinction of particular living organisms; field evidence or representations, including models of geologic cross-sections; sedimentary layering) to identify patterns of Earth's major historical events (e.g., formation of mountain chains and ocean basins, significant volcanic eruptions, fossilization, folding, faulting, igneous intrusion, erosion).

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 5 :
5 ) Use evidence to explain how different geologic processes shape Earth's history over widely varying scales of space and time (e.g., chemical and physical erosion; tectonic plate processes; volcanic eruptions; meteor impacts; regional geographical features, including Alabama fault lines, Rickwood Caverns, and Wetumpka Impact Crater).

Subject: Science (6)
Title: Great Rivers 2: The Ups and Downs of River Flooding
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/great-rivers-2-the-ups-and-downs-of-river-flooding/
Description:

This is the second of a strand of three lessons entitled Great Rivers: Where Ecology Meets History. The lessons address the concept of large rivers as dynamic ecological systems that have had vital influences on human history. This lesson focuses on flooding, both because of its importance to human history, and because it is often misunderstood. Central to this lesson is the concept that while some floods may be predictable in a general way (i.e., in the springtime), floods do not occur on a schedule.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] ES6 (6) 4 :
4 ) Construct explanations from geologic evidence (e.g., change or extinction of particular living organisms; field evidence or representations, including models of geologic cross-sections; sedimentary layering) to identify patterns of Earth's major historical events (e.g., formation of mountain chains and ocean basins, significant volcanic eruptions, fossilization, folding, faulting, igneous intrusion, erosion).

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 5 :
5 ) Use evidence to explain how different geologic processes shape Earth's history over widely varying scales of space and time (e.g., chemical and physical erosion; tectonic plate processes; volcanic eruptions; meteor impacts; regional geographical features, including Alabama fault lines, Rickwood Caverns, and Wetumpka Impact Crater).

Subject: Science (6)
Title: Great Rivers 3: Great Rivers, Great Givers
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/great-rivers-3-great-rivers-great-givers/
Description:

This is the third lesson of a three-part series entitled Great Rivers: Where Ecology Meets History. These lessons address the concept of large rivers as dynamic, ecological systems that have had vital influences on human history. This lesson consists of a variety of brief sketches that illustrate how rivers have influenced human history from the dawn of civilization.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 3

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