ALEX Resources

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Lesson Plans (3) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Classroom Resources (18)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

[ELA2015] (7) 20 :
20 ) Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. [W.7.1]

a. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically. [W.7.1a]

b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text. [W.7.1b]

c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence. [W.7.1c]

d. Establish and maintain a formal style. [W.7.1d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. [W.7.1e]

Subject: English Language Arts (7), or Science (7)
Title: Pollution and the Peppered Moth
Description:

This lesson will begin with students reviewing the steps of the scientific method, then applying the steps of the scientific method using an online interactive game. Next, students will utilize the steps of the scientific method to explore factors that caused the population of the peppered moth to change over time. The students will conduct an experiment to gather data regarding the factors that led to a population shift in the peppered moth species. Then, students will read an article about the history of the peppered moth and play an online interactive game to further explore the factors that led to a change in this species's population. Lastly, students will develop a writing piece that includes a claim related to the change in the peppered moth's population and evidence that was gathered from the experiment, reading, and online activity.

This lesson results from the ALEX Resource Gap Project.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 9 :
9 ) Engage in argument to defend the effectiveness of a design solution that maintains biodiversity and ecosystem services (e.g., using scientific, economic, and social considerations regarding purifying water, recycling nutrients, preventing soil erosion).

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Exponential Trash
Description:

Waste disposal is a problem for the entire Earth and must be dealt with in a responsible manner to maintain biodiversity in ecosystems. After investigating the amount of waste they produce as an individual, family, class, school, community, and society, students investigate how items decompose in a landfill and develop arguments to support a solution to the problem. Students engage in argument to defend the effectiveness of a design solution on a proposed method of disposing of waste in their school and community. 

This lesson results from a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 5 :
5 ) Examine the cycling of matter between abiotic and biotic parts of ecosystems to explain the flow of energy and the conservation of matter.

a. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about how food is broken down through chemical reactions to create new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as it moves through an organism.

b. Generate a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 7 :
7 ) Use models to construct explanations of the various biogeochemical cycles of Earth (e.g., water, carbon, nitrogen) and the flow of energy that drives these processes.

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 14 :
14 ) Analyze and interpret data (e.g., tables, graphs, maps of global and regional temperatures; atmospheric levels of gases such as carbon dioxide and methane; rates of human activities) to describe how various human activities (e.g., use of fossil fuels, creation of urban heat islands, agricultural practices) and natural processes (e.g., solar radiation, greenhouse effect, volcanic activity) may cause changes in local and global temperatures over time.

[SC2015] ES6 (6) 15 :
15 ) Analyze evidence (e.g., databases on human populations, rates of consumption of food and other natural resources) to explain how changes in human population, per capita consumption of natural resources, and other human activities (e.g., land use, resource development, water and air pollution, urbanization) affect Earth's systems.

Subject: Science (6 - 7)
Title: Climate Change & The Carbon Cycle
Description:

Students will explore greenhouse gases, how they effect the carbon cycle and the human role in climate change.  

This lesson was created as part of the 2016 NASA STEM Standards of Practice Project, a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.




ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Changes in Ecosystems StudyJam
URL: https://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/ecosystems/changes-ecosystems.htm
Description:

Ecosystems are constantly going through gradual changes. Sometimes those changes are natural, and sometimes they are caused by humans.

The classroom resource provides a video that will describe how ecosystems can change over time due to natural and human activity. There is also a short test that can be used to assess students' understanding.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Interrupted Migrations: Impacts and Solutions
URL: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/lesson/interrupted-migrations-impacts-solutions/
Description:

Students investigate different solutions to human impacts on animal migration and identify different stakeholders; this information will be represented in the final map layer for their unit project. Groups develop and present an evidence-based argument that takes a stand on a specific human impact on animal migration and aims to convince stakeholders to implement a recommended solution. This lesson is part of the Detours and Distractions: How Humans Impact Migration Patterns unit.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 6 :
6 ) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: It’s All About the Resources
URL: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/lesson/its-all-about-resources/
Description:

Students brainstorm what they know and need to learn about endangered species, in order to best answer the driving question for the unit. Students then engage with a variety of sources about the Sumatran rhino to learn about conservation concepts, including causes of extinction, food webs, and ecosystem services. This lesson is part of the Extinction Stinks! unit.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 6 :
6 ) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Eliminating Extinction—It’s Complicated!
URL: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/lesson/eliminating-extinction-its-complicated/
Description:

Students receive their target species and perform background research. Students learn about working with local populations to protect endangered species and read several conservation success stories. Students engage with two conservation storytellers and apply the power of storytelling to their target species. They then compare two grant proposals to prepare for writing their own proposals. This lesson is part of the Extinction Stinks! unit.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 6 :
6 ) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Drivers of Extinction
URL: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/lesson/drivers-extinction/
Description:

Students explore drivers of extinction across Earth’s major biomes, including human-to environment interactions that threaten biodiversity and seek solutions to mitigate habitat loss and prevent extinction. As a result, they develop research-based action steps critical to protecting a certain species and incorporate key findings into their culminating conservation pamphlets. This lesson is part of the Engaging in the Fight Against Extinction unit.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: There’s an Outbreak!
URL: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/lesson/theres-outbreak/
Description:

In this series of activities, students learn about how microbial diseases are transmitted and start to think about who is involved in a community response to an outbreak of an infectious disease. Students use the case of John Snow to learn how epidemiologists can use maps to locate the source of an outbreak and map a hypothetical pathway of disease transmission for a particular disease. This lesson is part of the Menacing Microbes unit.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 6 :
6 ) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Making Sense of Migration
URL: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/lesson/making-sense-migration/
Description:

Students will engage with photographs, videos, handouts, and animations to learn why and how animals migrate, methods used to track and map migrations, and how humans are impacting animal migration. Students use a variety of resources to research a focal animal in order to create a map layer showing its migration pattern, which is part of their unit project. This lesson is part of the Detours and Distractions: How Humans Impact Migration Patterns unit.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (7) 10 :
10 ) Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. [RI.7.1]

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: English Language Arts (7), Science (7)
Title: Threatened Species Paired Text
URL: https://www.readworks.org/article/Threatened-Species/8e7ed4c3-56e2-4bf2-91c6-71167c94ced4#!articleTab:content/contentSection:38a40aed-4077-4270-954e-9179baec17e5/
Description:

The teacher will present two pieces of informational text from the website, ReadWorks. Students will interact with these non-fiction texts by annotating the text digitally. The students will answer the questions associated with the articles as an assessment. This learning activity will describe two different threatened species, one plant, and one animal species, and explain how changes in the species' ecosystem led to a population shift. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Nowhere to Hide
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/nowhere-to-hide/
Description:

This lesson focuses on the concept of natural selection, through the use of an interactive activity. This interactive is based on the story of the peppered moths that lived in the forests of Manchester England in the 1800's and were affected by a rise in pollution. In this activity, students will be able to observe the process of natural selection by changing the amount of pollution in an environment and then observing its effects on the survival of the green and orange bugs.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Endangered Species 1: Why Are Species Endangered?
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/endangered-species-1/
Description:

This lesson is part of a two-part series on endangered species. The purpose of this lesson is to orient students to the plight of endangered species and to help them understand and gain perspective on human issues that continue to endanger species and threaten our global environment.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Endangered Species 2: Working to Save Endangered Species
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/endangered-species-2/
Description:

This lesson is the second of a two-part series on endangered species. The purpose of this lesson is to explore the Endangered Species Act and the work of scientists who strive to protect species. It is important for students to ultimately see their government's role in addressing the ongoing endangerment crisis—through enforcement of the Endangered Species Act and the variety of conservationist agencies and scientific research efforts that are funded through public taxation. They will come to learn about their government's critical role in preserving natural resources and parks by establishing laws and enforcing them in order to protect society.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 6 :
6 ) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Urban Ecosystems 1: Cities Are Urban Ecosystems
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/urban-ecosystems-1/
Description:

This lesson is part of a lesson series that addresses the concept of cities as urban ecosystems that include both nature and humans in a largely human-built environment. This lesson introduces some of the principles of ecology, including the definition of an ecosystem as a community of living organisms interacting with its non-living environment. Students will be introduced to the study of ecosystems and models that are used by urban ecologists. The class will be invited to visit websites to see where the cities are on the planet, and they will have a chance to try some hands-on urban nature education activities.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 6 :
6 ) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Urban Ecosystems 2: Why Are There Cities? A Historical Perspective
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/urban-ecosystems-2/
Description:

This is the second lesson in a series that addresses the concept of cities as urban ecosystems that include both nature and humans in a largely human-built environment. This lesson looks at the conditions that led to the development of early cities (i.e. food production), as well as some of the factors that caused the decline of early cities (i.e. unsustainable resource use). Students will visit a variety of online sites to see pictures and perform exercises. They will try to bring their learning back home again in the summary exercises that focus on their personal family histories and the history of their local urban ecosystems. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 6 :
6 ) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Urban Ecosystems 3: Cities as Population Centers
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/urban-ecosystems-3/
Description:

This is the third lesson in a series that addresses the concept of cities as urban ecosystems that include both nature and humans in a largely human-built environment. This lesson looks at the enormous increase in size and number of cities in the very recent past and the influence of fossil fuel use in particular on urbanization. In this lesson, students will visit a variety of websites that deal with urban population, fossil fuel consumption, and the signals (i.e., carbon dioxide emissions) that can be used to track population changes. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 6 :
6 ) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Urban Ecosystems 5: In Defense of Cities
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/urban-ecosystems-5/
Description:

This is the last lesson in a series that addresses the concept of cities as urban ecosystems that include both nature and humans in a largely human-built environment. In this lesson, the class will learn about the concept of an ecological footprint. They will use an online ecological footprint calculator to compare the environmental impact of different levels of resource use, kinds of transportation, and similar factors. The second exercise will explore the natural world that exists in their community, no matter how urban it might be. Finally, they will brainstorm the qualities and characteristics of what they might consider an excellent, livable community.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 9 :
9 ) Engage in argument to defend the effectiveness of a design solution that maintains biodiversity and ecosystem services (e.g., using scientific, economic, and social considerations regarding purifying water, recycling nutrients, preventing soil erosion).

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Ecosystem Services - Water Purification
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/ecosystem-services-water-purification/
Description:

This lesson is about how ecosystems purify water and human activities that can alter these processes. It also discusses the value of the natural water purification service to humans. The take-home message is that the key to maintaining water purification services is to protect and restore the ecosystems that provide these services. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 6 :
6 ) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

[SC2015] LSC7 (7) 8 :
8 ) Construct an explanation to predict patterns of interactions in different ecosystems in terms of the relationships between and among organisms (e.g., competition, predation, mutualism, commensalism, parasitism).

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Yellowstone Wolves
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/yellowstone-wolves/
Description:

In this lesson, students will use the Internet to explore relationships between habitats and species (specifically the gray wolf and those species with which it must coexist) as well as the effect of physical and human forces on living things and their environment. This investigation uses the conflict between ranchers and wolves to explore the relationships between living things and their environments and the effects of physical and human forces on the natural world.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] LSC7 (7) 7 :
7 ) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Subject: Science (7)
Title: Burrowing Owls
URL: http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/burrowing-owls/
Description:

This lesson uses the example of the Burrowing Owl to illustrate how human activities can control the fate of a species. In addition to exploring the negative impact community development has had on the owl's habitat, students will read about proactive steps people have taken to reverse this destruction.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 18

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