ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (2) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (3) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (14)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

[DLIT] (9-12) 31 :
25) Utilize a variety of digital tools to create digital artifacts across content areas.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12), or Science (9 - 12)
Title: Bond Polarity and Determining Molecular Geometry
Description:

In this lesson, students will examine electronegativities of atoms relative to one another to determine if a covalent bond will be classified as polar or nonpolar.  Students will use an online simulation to help them understand the importance of lone pairs of electrons as well as bonding pairs of electrons.  Students will use ball-and-stick models to examine and identify the shapes of various molecules.

This lesson results from a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA. 




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

[DLIT] (9-12) 31 :
25) Utilize a variety of digital tools to create digital artifacts across content areas.

[DLIT] (9-12) 37 :
31) Create interactive data visualizations using software tools to help others understand real-world phenomena.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (9 - 12), or Science (9 - 12)
Title: Predicting Periodic Trends
Description:

In this lesson, students will gather quantitative information to construct a graph to show the period trends in electronegativity, electron affinity, and ionization energy. Once, the trends are recognized they will construct a model of these periodic trends using the Alabama Science in Motion Lab (Periodic Trends: Graphs and Straws). 

This lesson results from a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Balancing Chemical Equations Interactive
Description:

When students learn a new skill, such as balancing equations, practice is important to establish mastery. This Jefferson Lab game provides plenty of practice and encouragement to help students master this topic. It allows students to select equations at various difficulty levels to engage students without extensive frustration.  




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Atoms & Bonding
Description:

Kahoot! allows teachers to create or use already created quizzes, discussions, and surveys to enhance student learning.

As a culminating activity, this Kahoot! will serve as a formative assessment after lessons about Atoms and Bonding.  




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Structure of the Atom
Description:

The Element Math Game is an interactive quiz that helps students learn the math involved in calculating the number of protons, neutrons and electrons in various elements.




ALEX Learning Activities: 3

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] PS8 (8) 1 :
1 ) Analyze patterns within the periodic table to construct models (e.g., molecular-level models, including drawings; computer representations) that illustrate the structure, composition, and characteristics of atoms and molecules.

[SC2015] PSC (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties and trends (e.g., reactivity of metals; types of bonds formed, including ionic, covalent, and polar covalent; numbers of bonds formed; reactions with oxygen) of main group elements based on the patterns of valence electrons in atoms.

[SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (8 - 12)
Title: The Strange World of the Electron
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/phy03.sci.phys.matter.lp_strange/the-strange-world-of-the-electron/
Description:

In this lesson, students learn the meaning of the term element and discover that all elements on Earth were formed in stars. They examine the structure of atoms and discover that scientists' understanding of this structure has changed over time--and will likely be refined even further. Lastly, they begin to explore the sometimes strange arrangement and behavior of electrons and to connect these characteristics to the chemical properties of elements. This activity is the second of three lessons. The first, The Periodic Table of the Elements, explored the origin of the periodic table. The third, Repeating Patterns: The Shape of the Periodic Table, shows how quantum electron structure determines the arrangement of elements in the periodic table.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] PS8 (8) 1 :
1 ) Analyze patterns within the periodic table to construct models (e.g., molecular-level models, including drawings; computer representations) that illustrate the structure, composition, and characteristics of atoms and molecules.

[SC2015] PSC (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties and trends (e.g., reactivity of metals; types of bonds formed, including ionic, covalent, and polar covalent; numbers of bonds formed; reactions with oxygen) of main group elements based on the patterns of valence electrons in atoms.

[SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Obtain and communicate information from historical experiments (e.g., work by Mendeleev and Moseley, Rutherford's gold foil experiment, Thomson's cathode ray experiment, Millikan's oil drop experiment, Bohr's interpretation of bright line spectra) to determine the structure and function of an atom and to analyze the patterns represented in the periodic table.

[SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (8 - 12)
Title: Repeating Patterns: The Shape of the Periodic Table
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/phy03.sci.phys.matter.lp_patterns/repeating-patterns-the-shape-of-the-periodic-table/
Description:

This lesson--the third in a series of three lesson plans about the Periodic Table of Elements--explains why the elements exhibit periodicity, why the periodic table of elements is shaped the way it is, and how we are able to predict the characteristics of elements yet to be discovered or created. Students create electron configuration diagrams that describe the arrangement of electrons around the nucleus. This lesson is the third of three lessons and is intended as an enhancement activity following the completion of the first two lessons. The first lesson, The Periodic Table of the Elements, explored the origin of the periodic table. The second lesson, The Strange World of the Electron, described the structure of the atom.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Network Solids and Carbon: Crash Course Chemistry #34
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/0b9cfa12-85c9-472a-b03d-8b6fb27a67b3/network-solids-and-carbon-crash-course-chemistry-34/
Description:

In this episode, Hank talks about network solids and carbon and how you can actually create a diamond from plain old carbon. Well, you probably can't unless you own a bunch of elephants. It's a long story where you will learn about solid networks, diamond and graphite network structures, and sheet and 3D networks. It's not making diamonds from scratch, but it's still pretty cool.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Silicon: The Internet's Favorite Element | Crash Course Chemistry #35
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/58d18c9d-4e92-43c6-9098-ebec7a48b6df/silicon-the-internets-favorite-element-crash-course-chemistry-35/
Description:

In this episode, we talk about Silicon Valley's namesake and how network solids are at the heart of it all. Hank also discusses solid-state semiconductors, N-type and P-type semiconductors, diodes, transistors, computer chips, and binary code--all from the same thing that makes up sand.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Electrochemistry: Crash Course Chemistry #36
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/8300efe0-bd2a-4fae-b368-a4445f5baba3/electrochemistry-crash-course-chemistry-36/
Description:

Contained within, Hank discusses electrochemical reactions. The episode looks at half-reactions, how batteries work, galvanic cells, voltage, standard reduction potential, cell potential, electrolysis, and electroplating, and the things that go into making it possible for you to watch this episode of Crash Course Chemistry.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Nomenclature: Crash Course Chemistry #44
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/d542ef56-b9a0-4e86-bc2c-13d8028bdd7e/nomenclature-crash-course-chemistry-44/
Description:

In this video, Hank explores the naming conventions that exist within the chemistry community. IUPAC exists but tries to keep in mind that they're doing it for the greater good. In this episode, Hank talks about IUPAC, prefixes, suffixes, ranking, numbers for carbon chains, and cis or trans double bonds.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/fc1461da-20f4-41cb-9b2f-289a2f1839f1/types-of-chemical-bonds-crash-course-chemistry-22/
Description:

Atoms are a lot like us. We call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. In this video, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/c4eef4cc-0364-48f4-a25e-a2904a73fdd5/polar-non-polar-molecules-crash-course-chemistry-23/
Description:

In this video, you'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so good at fostering life on Earth.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Bonding Models and Lewis Structures: Crash Course Chemistry #24
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/3dae2ec9-414e-4ff7-a438-08cb24ebff9c/bonding-models-and-lewis-structures-crash-course-chemistry-24/
Description:

In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses why we need models in the world and how we can learn from them--even when they're almost completely wrong. Plus, learn the glory of the Lewis Dot Structure.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Orbitals: Crash Course Chemistry #25
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/7ad98ce8-af83-43cc-97ad-c3d2e0a6ba13/orbitals-crash-course-chemistry-25/
Description:

In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses what molecules actually look like and why, some quantum-mechanical three-dimensional wave functions are explored, he touches on hybridization, and delves into sigma and pi bonds.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Precipitation Reactions: Crash Course Chemistry #9
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/8db1c997-ca9d-41fd-bd93-1280a230cf88/precipitation-reactions-crash-course-chemistry-9/
Description:

A lot of ionic compounds dissolve in water, dissociating into individual ions. But when two ions find each other form an insoluble compound, they suddenly fall out of solution in what's called a precipitation reaction. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, we learn about precipitation, precipitates, anions, cations, and how to describe and discuss ionic reactions.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Redox Reactions: Crash Course Chemistry #10
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/b50a6d13-14d6-409b-9c92-fd92c3ccd2b1/redox-reactions-crash-course-chemistry-10/
Description:

In this video, we will explore all the magic in the transfer of electrons. Reduction (gaining electrons) and oxidation (the loss of electrons) combine to form Redox chemistry, which contains the majority of chemical reactions. As electrons jump from atom to atom, they carry energy with them, and that transfer of energy is what makes all life on earth possible.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: How To Speak Chemistrian: Crash Course Chemistry #11
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/06deabb0-e4fb-4209-acc6-46e8019e4085/how-to-speak-chemistrian-crash-course-chemistry-11/
Description:

Learning to talk about chemistry can be like learning a foreign language, but Hank is here to help with some straightforward and simple rules to help you learn to speak Chemistrian like a native. In this video, Hank discusses determining and writing formulas, the names of monatomic ions, finding elements on the periodic table, and naming acids and their anions. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Obtain and communicate information from historical experiments (e.g., work by Mendeleev and Moseley, Rutherford's gold foil experiment, Thomson's cathode ray experiment, Millikan's oil drop experiment, Bohr's interpretation of bright line spectra) to determine the structure and function of an atom and to analyze the patterns represented in the periodic table.

[SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 3 :
3 ) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: The Electron: Crash Course Chemistry #5
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/be7164ef-6d9f-46fe-9865-5d3907487c94/the-electron-crash-course-chemistry-5/
Description:

In this video, Hank brings us the story of the electron. He describes how reality is a kind of music, discussing electron shells and orbitals, electron configurations, ionization and electron affinities, and how all these things can be understood via the periodic table.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 14

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