ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (1) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (9)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Is Gatorade the Only Source of Electrolytes? 
Description:

Students will consider the marketing campaigns of Gatorade to help identify what makes a substance an electrolyte.  Students will plan and conduct an investigation to test common ionic and covalent substances to determine if the substance is an electrolyte or non-electrolyte when dissolved in solution.  

This lesson results from a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] PSC (9-12) 4 :
4 ) Analyze and interpret data using acid-base indicators (e.g., color-changing markers, pH paper) to distinguish between acids and bases, including comparisons between strong and weak acids and bases.

[SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Exploring Acids and Bases
Description:

How do I know if a substance is an acid or base?  In this activity, the students will use a digital simulation model to explore and gather evidence on how acids and bases dissociate in solution. The students will also gather data on how pH and conductivity change with the strength of an acid or base. Finally, they will develop their own working definition of acid, base, indicator, and pH scale by gathering data during the simulation. This activity is an introductory activity to acids and bases and no prior knowledge is needed to complete the simulation.

Note: The PhET simulation is a free resource that is copyrighted by the University of Colorado. The handout and lesson format are teacher-created. 

This activity was created as a result of the GAP Resource Summit.




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

Go To Top of page
ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Doing Solids: Crash Course Chemistry #33
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/30df5acd-89de-4574-a7dd-acd40805cfc7/doing-solids-crash-course-chemistry-33/
Description:

In this video, Hank discusses different kinds of solids out there and talks about why they're all different and have different properties. Today, you'll learn about amorphous and crystalline solids, types of crystalline solids, types of crystalline atomic solids, properties of each type of solid, and that the properties depend on the bond types.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Hydrocarbon Derivatives: Crash Course Chemistry #43
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/cf983b55-4794-4481-9676-d4923e37a719/hydrocarbon-derivatives-crash-course-chemistry-43/
Description:

Hank takes today's Crash Course video to discuss some confusing ideas about hydrocarbon derivatives but then makes it all make more sense. He discusses alcohols, hydroxyl groups, aldehydes, carboxylic acid, acetones, amines, and ethers and esters.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Polymers: Crash Course Chemistry #45
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ce972499-d67f-4eee-af0e-fe1dddfc03af/polymers-crash-course-chemistry-45/
Description:

The world of polymers is so amazingly integrated into our daily lives that we sometimes forget how amazing they are. Here, Hank talks about how they have developed and the different types of polymers that are common in the world today, including some that may surprise you.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Solutions: Crash Course Chemistry #27
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/aee61925-bbba-4b93-9494-7068f00b2760/solutions-crash-course-chemistry-27/
Description:

In this episode, Hank illustrates the ideas of solutions and discusses molarity, molality, and mass percent. He also discusses why polar solvents dissolve polar solutes, and nonpolar solvents dissolve nonpolar solutes.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: pH and pOH: Crash Course Chemistry #30
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/a892621a-341d-4d8f-ace2-dea46304b2b2/ph-and-poh-crash-course-chemistry-30/
Description:

In this episode, Hank goes over reversible reactions, the water dissociation constant, what pH and pOH actually mean, acids, bases, and neutral substances and logarithms, strong acids, weak acids, how to calculate pH and pOH, and litmus paper.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Buffers, the Acid Rain Slayer: Crash Course Chemistry #31
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/1ff9f8a8-6540-4dfb-8bff-c743183337ac/buffers-the-acid-rain-slayer-crash-course-chemistry-31/
Description:

In this episode, Hank talks about how nutty our world is via buffers. He defines buffers and their compositions, talks about carbonate buffering systems in nature, acid rain, pH of buffers, and titration. Plus, a really cool experiment using indicators to showcase just how awesome buffers are.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Water and Solutions for Dirty Laundry: Crash Course Chemistry #7
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/d29be82a-a240-4fd4-93a2-da9ad9b44429/water-and-solutions-for-dirty-laundry-crash-course-chemistry-7/
Description:

Dihydrogen monoxide (better known as water) is the key to nearly everything. It falls from the sky, makes up 60% of our bodies, and just about every chemical process related to life takes place with it or in it. Without it, none of the chemical reactions that keep us alive would happen, none of the reactions that sustain any life form on earth would happen, and the majority of inorganic chemical reactions that shape the surface of the earth would not happen either. Every one of us uses water for all kinds of chemistry every day--our body chemistry, our food chemistry, and our laundry chemistry all take place in water. In this Crash Course Chemistry, we learn about some of the properties of water that make it so special. We explore its polarity and dielectric property; how electrolytes can be used to classify solutions; and we discover how to calculate a solution's molarity as well as how to dilute a solution using the dilution equation.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Acid Base Reactions in Solution: Crash Course Chemistry #8
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/05275c23-b581-48e8-bbdb-5a4bcac9d386/acid-base-reactions-in-solution-crash-course-chemistry-8/
Description:

In this video, Hank talks about the actual reactions happening in solutions--atoms reorganizing themselves to create whole new substances in the processes that make our world the one we know and love. We focus on acids and bases and their proton-exchanging ways.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] CHEM (9-12) 6 :
6 ) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: The Creation of Chemistry--The Fundamental Laws: Crash Course Chemistry #3
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/7a132574-b786-4ee3-b13d-08a76913896b/the-creation-of-chemistry-the-fundamental-laws-crash-course-chemistry-3/
Description:

Take a historical perspective on the creation of the science, which didn't really exist until a super-smart, super-wealthy Frenchman put the puzzle pieces together. In this video, Hank tells the story of how we went from alchemists to chemists, who understood the law of conservation of mass as proposed by a decapitated aristocrat and explains how we came to have a greater understanding of how chemical compounds work and eventually a complete understanding of what atoms and molecules are.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 9

Go To Top of page