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Lesson Plans (2) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Classroom Resources (5)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] PHYS (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Investigate and analyze, based on evidence obtained through observation or experimental design, the motion of an object using both graphical and mathematical models (e.g., creating or interpreting graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time graphs for one- and two-dimensional motion; solving problems using kinematic equations for the case of constant acceleration) that may include descriptors such as position, distance traveled, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration.

[SC2015] PHYS (9-12) 5 :
5 ) Construct models that illustrate how energy is related to work performed on or by an object and explain how different forms of energy are transformed from one form to another (e.g., distinguishing between kinetic, potential, and other forms of energy such as thermal and sound; applying both the work-energy theorem and the law of conservation of energy to systems such as roller coasters, falling objects, and spring-mass systems; discussing the effect of frictional forces on energy conservation and how it affects the motion of an object).

[SC2015] PSC (9-12) 7 :
7 ) Analyze and interpret data for one- and two-dimensional motion applying basic concepts of distance, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration (e.g., velocity versus time graphs, displacement versus time graphs, acceleration versus time graphs).

[SC2015] PSC (9-12) 8 :
8 ) Apply Newton's laws to predict the resulting motion of a system by constructing force diagrams that identify the external forces acting on the system, including friction (e.g., a book on a table, an object being pushed across a floor, an accelerating car).

[SC2015] PSC (9-12) 11 :
11 ) Design and conduct investigations to verify the law of conservation of energy, including transformations of potential energy, kinetic energy, thermal energy, and the effect of any work performed on or by the system.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Energy and Work Amusement Park Style
Description:

This is a lesson presenting energy and work. It covers: types of energy, forms of energy, work, law of conservation of energy, and renewable and nonrenewable energy sources. In the activities section, one will find links to Internet sites that explore concepts of energy and work. Interactive labs are also included in this lesson. The lesson can serve as a student-led or teacher-led lesson. It gives a brief statement of facts; therefore, the teacher must provide expansions, if needed. The expansions could come from the Internet sites since many of them go into more detail about the concepts. The teacher will also be expected to supply some form of assessment for the lesson.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] PHYS (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Investigate and analyze, based on evidence obtained through observation or experimental design, the motion of an object using both graphical and mathematical models (e.g., creating or interpreting graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time graphs for one- and two-dimensional motion; solving problems using kinematic equations for the case of constant acceleration) that may include descriptors such as position, distance traveled, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration.

[SC2015] PHYS (9-12) 2 :
2 ) Identify external forces in a system and apply Newton's laws graphically by using models such as free-body diagrams to explain how the motion of an object is affected, ranging from simple to complex, and including circular motion.

a. Use mathematical computations to derive simple equations of motion for various systems using Newton's second law.

b. Use mathematical computations to explain the nature of forces (e.g., tension, friction, normal) related to Newton's second and third laws.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Rocket Activity: Heavy Lifting
Description:

Raising heavy payloads to orbit is challenging.  Rockets require powerful engines and massive amounts of propellants. NASA is looking for creative ideas for launching heavy lift vehicles to deliver supplies to Mars.  Student teams receive identical parts to build rockets. The team that is able to lift the greatest payload into space (the ceiling) is the winner.

This lesson was created as part of the 2016 NASA STEM Standards of Practice Project, a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.




ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] PHYS (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Investigate and analyze, based on evidence obtained through observation or experimental design, the motion of an object using both graphical and mathematical models (e.g., creating or interpreting graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time graphs for one- and two-dimensional motion; solving problems using kinematic equations for the case of constant acceleration) that may include descriptors such as position, distance traveled, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration.

[SC2015] PHYS (9-12) 10 :
10 ) Plan and carry out investigations that evaluate the mathematical explanations of light as related to optical systems (e.g., reflection, refraction, diffraction, intensity, polarization, Snell's law, the inverse square law).

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Special Relativity: Crash Course Physics #42
URL: https://www.pbs.org/video/special-relativity-crash-course-physics-42-zawb5t/
Description:

So we've all heard of relativity, right? What is relativity? How does it relate to light? Motion? In this episode of Crash Course Physics, Dr. Shini talks to us about perspective, observation, and how relativity is really weird.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] PHYS (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Investigate and analyze, based on evidence obtained through observation or experimental design, the motion of an object using both graphical and mathematical models (e.g., creating or interpreting graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time graphs for one- and two-dimensional motion; solving problems using kinematic equations for the case of constant acceleration) that may include descriptors such as position, distance traveled, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Statics: Crash Course Physics #13
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/statics-crashcourse-2013/statics-crash-course-physics/
Description:

Whenever you walk across a bridge or lean on a building, statics are at work. Statics is the study of objects when they're not accelerating. In this episode of Crash Course Physics, Dr. Shini talks to us about stretching, compressing, and springing as they relate to statics.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] PHYS (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Investigate and analyze, based on evidence obtained through observation or experimental design, the motion of an object using both graphical and mathematical models (e.g., creating or interpreting graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time graphs for one- and two-dimensional motion; solving problems using kinematic equations for the case of constant acceleration) that may include descriptors such as position, distance traveled, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Fluids in Motion: Crash Course Physics #15
URL: https://aptv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/fluids-in-motion-crashcourse-2015/fluids-in-motion-crash-course-physics/
Description:

This video explores fluids and fluid dynamics. How do fluids act when they arre in motion? How does pressure in different places change water flow? And what is one of the motion annoying things about filming outside on a nice day?



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] PHYS (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Investigate and analyze, based on evidence obtained through observation or experimental design, the motion of an object using both graphical and mathematical models (e.g., creating or interpreting graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time graphs for one- and two-dimensional motion; solving problems using kinematic equations for the case of constant acceleration) that may include descriptors such as position, distance traveled, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Motion in a Straight Line: Crash Course Physics #1
URL: https://www.pbs.org/video/crash-course-physics-motion-straight-line/
Description:

In this first episode of Crash Course Physics, Dr. Shini Somara introduces us to the ideas of motion in a straight line. She talks about displacement, acceleration, time, velocity, and the definition of acceleration.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] PHYS (9-12) 1 :
1 ) Investigate and analyze, based on evidence obtained through observation or experimental design, the motion of an object using both graphical and mathematical models (e.g., creating or interpreting graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time graphs for one- and two-dimensional motion; solving problems using kinematic equations for the case of constant acceleration) that may include descriptors such as position, distance traveled, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration.

Subject: Science (9 - 12)
Title: Vectors and 2D Motion: Crash Course Physics #4
URL: https://www.pbs.org/video/crash-course-physics-vectors-and-2d-motion-crash-course-physics-4/
Description:

Dr. Shini introduces the ideas of vectors and scalars so we can better understand how to figure out motion in two dimensions. But what does that have to do with baseball? Or two baseballs?



ALEX Classroom Resources: 5

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