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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [LAT] LA1 (7-12) 2 :
2) Read and understand appropriate Latin vocabulary, inflectional systems, and syntax.

a. Summarize and translate passages of Latin composed or adapted for acquisition of content and language skills appropriate for Level I.

b. Answer questions in Latin or English about short passages of Latin composed or adapted for acquisition of content and language skills appropriate to Level I.

Examples of grammar appropriate to Level I: See the Latin Grammar Addendum (Appendix A, page 67).

[LAT] LA1 (7-12) 5 :
5) Investigate and describe elements of Roman daily life.

Examples: Calendar, household gods, government, family, social organization, Roman games, and holidays like Saturnalia.

7) Investigate and describe elements of Roman material culture.

Examples: Temples, architecture, food, and clothing.

[LAT] LA1 (7-12) 13 :
13) Identify similarities of their own culture to that of the Greco-Roman world.

Examples: Architecture, daily life, themes and heroes of classical mythology.

[LAT] LA2 (7-12) 2 :
2) Read, understand, and translate Latin at an Intermediate Low level.

a. Summarize and translate passages of adapted or unadapted Latin appropriate to their level.

b. Answer questions in Latin or English to demonstrate understanding of adapted or unadapted Latin appropriate to their level.

Examples of grammar and syntax appropriate to Level II: See the Latin Grammar Addendum.

[LAT] LA2 (7-12) 9 :
9) Compare language patterns of Latin and their own language.

Examples: Differences in the way Latin and English express indirect statements.

Subject: Latin (7 - 12)
Title: Latin Discussion Questions: Food
URL: http://ancientgraffiti.org/about/wp-content/uploads/DiscussionQuestions/Food-Featured-Graffiti-Discussion-Questions.pdf
Description:

This Latin activity offers 5 warm-up style discussion activities encouraging students to talk about Roman culture as it relates to food. Some of the discussion activities have links to photos of graffiti discovered on ancient ruins while others provide a textual reference of graffiti uncovered by archeologists. Students are asked to interact with the text/graffiti as they discuss the translations uncovered by archeologists and discuss how each relates to the food-related aspects of Roman life.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [LAT] LA1 (7-12) 5 :
5) Investigate and describe elements of Roman daily life.

Examples: Calendar, household gods, government, family, social organization, Roman games, and holidays like Saturnalia.

6) Investigate and describe the most important Greco-Roman deities, including their characteristics, duties, and associated myths.

Examples: Olympian gods, earth gods, mythical monsters, and creation stories.

[LAT] LA1 (7-12) 7 :
7) Investigate and describe elements of Roman material culture.

Examples: Temples, architecture, food, and clothing.

[LAT] LA2 (7-12) 4 :
4) Explain the significance of people, events, social structures, and political terms in Roman history.

Examples: Heroes of the early Roman Republic, Scipio, Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Caesar, Antony, Octavian, Constantine, and Justinian.
Events include the founding of Rome, the secession of the Plebs, Punic Wars, and civil wars.
Patrician and plebeian classes, the role of women in Roman society, and slavery in the ancient world.
Monarchy, republic, populares, optimates, cursus honorum, First and Second Triumvirates.

[LAT] LA2 (7-12) 5 :
5) Compare the actions of Roman heroes and historical figures and explain the differences.

Examples: Compare the actions of Marius, Sulla, Caesar, or Cicero to Cincinnatus, Camillus, or Regulus.

Subject: Latin (7 - 12)
Title: Ancient Greek and Roman Talk Show
URL: https://www.getty.edu/education/teachers/trippack/villa_vsi_talkshow.html
Description:

This activity lets students explore ancient Greek gods and Roman gods through art images provided by The J. Paul Getty Museum. Students are encouraged to repeat the plot presented in "Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure" by going back in time to meet these deities. They then bring their assigned deity back to the modern world where they create and participate in a mock television talk show style interview. Image links and student guides (handouts) are provided in the activity outline.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [LAT] LA1 (7-12) 5 :
5) Investigate and describe elements of Roman daily life.

Examples: Calendar, household gods, government, family, social organization, Roman games, and holidays like Saturnalia.

7) Investigate and describe elements of Roman material culture.

Examples: Temples, architecture, food, and clothing.

[LAT] LA1 (7-12) 8 :
8) Locate historically important cities and major geographical features of Italy and Western Europe, and describe their ancient and modern significance.

Examples: Rome, Pompeii, Capua, Ostia, and Brundisium.

Examples: The Tiber, Arno, and Po rivers, the Appian Way, Etruria, Britannia, Gallia, Germania, Graecia, Mare Nostrum, Aegean Sea, Adriatic Sea, and the Alps.

6) Locate historically significant cities, countries, and geographical features of the ancient Mediterranean world, and describe their relationship to their modern counterparts.

Examples: Carthage, Troy, Alexandria, Athens, Delphi, Constantinople; divisions of Gaul, Phoenicia, Magna Graecia, Crete, Sicily; Rubicon, Po, Nile, and Rhine rivers, the Alps and Pyrenees mountains.

[LAT] LA2 (7-12) 11 :
11) Compare the geography and social, political, legal, military, and economic systems of the Roman world to systems of the modern world.

Example: Compare a map of the provinces of the Roman Empire to a modern map of the Mediterranean region.

[LAT] LA3 (7-12) 4 :
4) Relate Roman cultural products to perspectives.

a. Investigate and describe values and perspectives in Roman prose authors.

Example: Values of pietas and gravitas found in the writings of Pliny.

b. Analyze important people in Roman history and literature to determine their cultural significance.

Examples: Gracchi brothers, Plautus, Terence, Cicero, Catiline, Sallust, Livy, Pliny the Elder, Pliny the Younger, Seneca, or Tacitus.

[LAT] LA3 (7-12) 5 :
5) Relate Roman cultural practices to perspectives.

a. Contrast the ideals of Roman political factions in the first Century B.C.E.

Example: The conflict between Cicero and Catiline, the proposed policies of the optimates and populares.

Subject: Latin (7 - 12)
Title: Visualizing Imperial Rome
URL: https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/world-history/ancient-medieval/roman-empire-survey/v/a-tour-through-ancient-rome-in-320-c-e
Description:

This 11-minute video features a fly-over tour of a digitally recreated Rome. As students fly over the city they are guided by a narrated conversation as two hosts discuss each of the key locations as well as key aspects of Roman Culture including Roman values, the Roman empire, Roman leadership, Roman history, Roman architecture, Roman art, and view of human beings toward the gods. A detailed transcript is included along with links to further information on the following featured locations: Arche of Constantine, Arch of Titus, Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine, Roman Forum, Imperial Fora, Forum and column of Trajan, Pantheon, and Colosseum.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 3
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