ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (2) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (3) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (2)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 4 :
4 ) Gather evidence to support how plants and animals provide for their needs by altering their environment (e.g., tree roots breaking a sidewalk to provide space, red fox burrowing to create a den to raise young, humans growing gardens for food and building roads for transportation).

[ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

Subject: Arts Education (K), or Science (K)
Title: Animal Alterations: How Do Animals Change Their Habitats?
Description:

Students will begin by describing how humans change their environment in order to provide for their needs. Students will watch a video clip that explains how several forest animals alter their habitats, and then explain how other animals might change their environment in order to survive. At the conclusion of the lesson, students will create a drawing that illustrates how an animal may alter their environment to provide for its needs.

This lesson results from a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (0) 3 :
3) Build skills by following a sequence of steps to create art that expresses feeling and ideas.

Examples: Explore the books Why is Blue Dog Blue? by G. Rodrigue and My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss to understand color meanings and moods.

[ARTS] VISA (0) 6 :
6) Share and talk about the art they are creating.

a. Use art vocabulary: line, shape, color, and pattern.

Example: Use the book Lines that Wiggle by Candace Whitman.

Subject: Arts Education (K)
Title: Little Quack
Description:

After reading the book, Little Quack, students will explore and recreate a picture from the story using several different textures.

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

Subject: Arts Education (K)
Title: What is Pointillism?
Description:

Students will learn about Vincent Van Gogh and his style of painting. Students will use the see-think-wonder strategy to analyze the artwork. Students will create a sunflower painting using the pointillism style of Van Gogh. 

This activity was created as a result of the Arts COS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (0) 6 :
6 ) Identify and plan possible solutions (e.g., reducing, reusing, recycling) to lessen the human impact on the local environment.*

[ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

Subject: Science (K), Arts Education (K)
Title: How Can You Reduce Your Impact on the Environment?
Description:

Students will use what they have learned about recycling and reusing to complete this STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) activity. Students will use recycled items to create something new.   

This activity was created as a result of the Arts COS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[SC2015] (0) 3 :
3 ) Distinguish between living and nonliving things and verify what living things need to survive (e.g., animals needing food, water, and air; plants needing nutrients, water, sunlight, and air).

Subject: Arts Education (K), Science (K)
Title: What Do Plants Need to Survive?
Description:

Students will use their knowledge of the parts of a plant to discuss what a plant needs to survive. Students will manipulate their three-dimensional plant to show the importance of all the parts of a plant. Students will use a variety of materials to create their 3D model. Examples of materials include pipe cleaners, paper towel rolls, paper, tissue paper, play dough, clay, etc. 

This activity was created as a result of the Arts COS Resource Development Summit.




ALEX Learning Activities: 3

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT (0) 6 :
6 ) Compare cultural similarities and differences in individuals, families, and communities.

Examples: celebrations, food, traditions

[SS2010] LWT1 (1) 11 :
11 ) Identify traditions and contributions of various cultures in the local community and state. (Alabama)

Examples: Kwanzaa, Christmas, Hanukkah, Fourth of July, Cinco de Mayo

[ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

Subject: Social Studies (K - 1), Arts Education (K - 1)
Title: Make Your Own Carnival Mask
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/puerto/carnival_mask.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students learn about Puerto Rico and Puerto Rican culture by creating their own Carnival mask.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT (0) 6 :
6 ) Compare cultural similarities and differences in individuals, families, and communities.

Examples: celebrations, food, traditions

[SS2010] LWT1 (1) 11 :
11 ) Identify traditions and contributions of various cultures in the local community and state. (Alabama)

Examples: Kwanzaa, Christmas, Hanukkah, Fourth of July, Cinco de Mayo

[SS2010] USS6 (6) 7 :
7 ) Identify changes on the American home front during World War II.

Example: rationing

•  Recognizing the retooling of factories from consumer to military production
•  Identifying new roles of women and African Americans in the workforce
•  Describing increased demand on the Birmingham steel industry and Port of Mobile facilities (Alabama)
•  Describing the experience of African Americans and Japanese Americans in the United States during World War II, including the Tuskegee Airmen and occupants of internment camps (Alabama)
[ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (6) 2 :
2) Formulate an artistic investigation and discovery of relevant content for creating art.

Example: Make, share, and revise a list of ideas and preliminary sketches.

Subject: Social Studies (K - 6), Arts Education (K - 6)
Title: Make Your Own Fish Kite
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/internment/internment_kite.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students make their own Koinobori (fish kite). These kites were an important way of life for Japanese American children in internment camps during World War II.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 2

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