ALEX Resources

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Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (7)


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] USS6 (6) 4 :
4 ) Identify cultural and economic developments in the United States from 1900 through the 1930s.

•  Describing the impact of various writers, musicians, and artists on American culture during the Harlem Renaissance and the Jazz Age
Examples: Langston Hughes, Louis Armstrong, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Andrew Wyeth, Frederic Remington, W. C. Handy, Erskine Hawkins, George Gershwin, Zora Neale Hurston (Alabama)

•  Identifying contributions of turn-of-the-century inventors
Examples: George Washington Carver, Henry Ford, Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Alva Edison, Wilbur and Orville Wright (Alabama)

•  Describing the emergence of the modern woman during the early 1900s
Examples: Amelia Earhart, Zelda Fitzgerald, Helen Keller, Susan B. Anthony, Margaret Washington, suffragettes, suffragists, flappers (Alabama)

•  Identifying notable persons of the early 1900s
Examples: Babe Ruth, Charles A. Lindbergh, W. E. B. Du Bois, John T. Scopes (Alabama)

•  Comparing results of the economic policies of the Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover Administrations
Examples: higher wages, increase in consumer goods, collapse of farm economy, extension of personal credit, stock market crash, Immigration Act of 1924

[ARTS] VISA (6) 2 :
2) Formulate an artistic investigation and discovery of relevant content for creating art.

Example: Make, share, and revise a list of ideas and preliminary sketches.

Subject: Social Studies (6), Arts Education (6)
Title: Harlem Renaissance Inspired Art
Description:

Students will use inspiration from Jacob Lawrence and Aaron Douglas to create their own Harlem Renaissance-inspired artwork. 




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (6) 23 :
23 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences. [W.6.3]

a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically. [W.6.3a]

b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. [W.6.3b]

c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another. [W.6.3c]

d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to convey experiences and events. [W.6.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.6.3e]

[ARTS] VISA (6) 2 :
2) Formulate an artistic investigation and discovery of relevant content for creating art.

Example: Make, share, and revise a list of ideas and preliminary sketches.

[ARTS] VISA (6) 3 :
3) Develop new ideas through open-ended experiments, using various materials, methods and approaches in creating works of art.

Subject: English Language Arts (6), Arts Education (6)
Title: Beginning, Middle, and End
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Sixth-Grade-Lesson-3.pdf
Description:

Students will analyze art and describe the beginning, middle, and end of the story portrayed.  They will write a personal narrative including a beginning, middle, and end.  They will draw a narrative storyboard in their sketchbook.  They will choose one event (beginning, middle, or end) from their storyboard and create a textile collage.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.   



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (6) 1 :
1) Work collaboratively to develop new and innovative ideas for creating art.

[ARTS] VISA (6) 2 :
2) Formulate an artistic investigation and discovery of relevant content for creating art.

Example: Make, share, and revise a list of ideas and preliminary sketches.

Subject: Arts Education (6)
Title: Values in Profile
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Sixth-Grade-Lesson-4.pdf
Description:

Students will analyze profile views in portraits.  They will practice sketching a head in profile.  They will draw a classmate's profile using charcoal.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (6) 2 :
2) Formulate an artistic investigation and discovery of relevant content for creating art.

Example: Make, share, and revise a list of ideas and preliminary sketches.

[ARTS] VISA (6) 5 :
5) Design or redesign objects, places, or systems that address the specific needs of a community and explore related careers.

a. Use one-point perspective to design three-dimensional objects.

Subject: Arts Education (6)
Title: Views in Architecture
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Sixth-Grade-Lesson-5.pdf
Description:

Students will identify types of lines and shapes in architecture.  They will draft a building elevation on grid paper.  They will trace their building using white paper and a pen.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.   



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (6) 2 :
2) Formulate an artistic investigation and discovery of relevant content for creating art.

Example: Make, share, and revise a list of ideas and preliminary sketches.

[ARTS] VISA (6) 7 :
7) Compare and contrast methods associated with preserving and presenting two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and digital artwork.

Examples: Storing preliminary sketches in a sketchbook or journal versus mounting and matting work for exhibition and saving personal work using digital methods.

Subject: Arts Education (6)
Title: Multiple Views in Columns
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Sixth-Grade-Lesson-7.pdf
Description:

Students will analyze sculptures focusing on characteristics of three-dimensional art.  They will make a columnar form out of clay.  Using the subtractive method, they will carve an image into the column.  They will decide how to present their column.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (6) 2 :
2) Formulate an artistic investigation and discovery of relevant content for creating art.

Example: Make, share, and revise a list of ideas and preliminary sketches.

Subject: Arts Education (6)
Title: Nonrepresentational Shapes
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Sixth-Grade-Lesson-1.pdf
Description:

Students will analyze shapes in art.  They will use colored pencils to practice their composition. They will use tape masking and glazing techniques with watercolor paints to create artwork based on the preliminary drawing.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [ARTS] VISA (6) 2 :
2) Formulate an artistic investigation and discovery of relevant content for creating art.

Example: Make, share, and revise a list of ideas and preliminary sketches.

[ARTS] VISA (6) 3 :
3) Develop new ideas through open-ended experiments, using various materials, methods and approaches in creating works of art.

Subject: Arts Education (6)
Title: Analogous Colors
URL: http://artsedwashington.org/curriculum/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Sixth-Grade-Lesson-2.pdf
Description:

Students will identify analogous colors on a color wheel.  They will choose three adjacent colors.  They will create a still-life portrait using oil pastel techniques such as strokes, layers, and blending.  Assessment rubric, letter to parents, examples of artwork, and lesson plan included in PDF.  



   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT (0) 6 :
6 ) Compare cultural similarities and differences in individuals, families, and communities.

Examples: celebrations, food, traditions

[SS2010] LWT1 (1) 11 :
11 ) Identify traditions and contributions of various cultures in the local community and state. (Alabama)

Examples: Kwanzaa, Christmas, Hanukkah, Fourth of July, Cinco de Mayo

[SS2010] USS6 (6) 7 :
7 ) Identify changes on the American home front during World War II.

Example: rationing

•  Recognizing the retooling of factories from consumer to military production
•  Identifying new roles of women and African Americans in the workforce
•  Describing increased demand on the Birmingham steel industry and Port of Mobile facilities (Alabama)
•  Describing the experience of African Americans and Japanese Americans in the United States during World War II, including the Tuskegee Airmen and occupants of internment camps (Alabama)
[ARTS] VISA (0) 1 :
1) Engage in self-directed exploration and imaginative play with art materials.

a. Use motor skills to create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Finger painting, watercolors, paper collage, and rubbings.

b. Use motor skills to create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Rolling, folding, cutting, molding, pinching and pulling clay.

[ARTS] VISA (1) 2 :
2) Explore and experiment with a range of art materials.

a. Create two-dimensional art.

Examples: Family portrait or gadget printing.

b. Create three-dimensional art.

Examples: Pinch pots or found-object sculptures.

[ARTS] VISA (6) 2 :
2) Formulate an artistic investigation and discovery of relevant content for creating art.

Example: Make, share, and revise a list of ideas and preliminary sketches.

Subject: Social Studies (K - 6), Arts Education (K - 6)
Title: Make Your Own Fish Kite
URL: https://amhistory.si.edu/ourstory/pdf/internment/internment_kite.pdf
Description:

In this learning activity, students make their own Koinobori (fish kite). These kites were an important way of life for Japanese American children in internment camps during World War II.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 7

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