ALEX Resources

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Learning Activities (4) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (7)


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Collecting and Organizing Data
Description:

Students will work collaboratively to collect data in a spreadsheet and create graphs or charts using Nearpod.

This activity results from the ALEX Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2019] (0) 15 :
15. Classify objects into given categories of 10 or fewer; count the number of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

a. Categorize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.
[DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

Subject: Mathematics (K), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Sort, Count, and Compare Fuzz Bugs
Description:

In this activity, students will use "Fuzz Bugs - Counting, Sorting, & Comparing" from ABCya that provides a fun and educational interactive game that gives students the opportunity to sort, count, and compare the fuzz bugs. The interactive helps students learn to sort objects by colors, count the objects, then compare the different fuzz bugs.

After students interact with "Fuzz Bugs - Counting, Sorting, & Comparing" from ABCya, students will then collect and organize data about the number and attributes of the "Fuzz Bugs" collected in a Google Sheets template. The Google Sheets template will allow students to tally the number of "Fuzz Bugs" and the cells will turn the color to create a chart of the data collected. 

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [MA2019] (0) 16 :
16. Identify and describe measurable attributes (length, weight, height) of a single object using vocabulary such as long/short, heavy/light, or tall/short.
[DLIT] (0) 18 :
12) Use a variety of digital devices, in both independent and collaborative settings.

Examples: Interactive boards, tablets, laptops, other handheld devices.

[DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

Subject: Mathematics (K), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Graphing Measurement: Analyzing Attributes of Objects’ Heights and Weights
Description:

In this learning activity, students will collaboratively create a Google Form to collect data about the measurements of random objects found within the classroom. The goal of the learning activity is to (1) introduce students to using informal language (short, tall, heavy, light, etc.) to describe an object's height and weight, (2) how to collect data, (3) how to analyze data to find trends, patterns, and other important information about the objects. The teacher will lead the students in the process of creating a Google Form to collect data and then use the data in a spreadsheet to create charts to find trends and patterns about the objects analyzed within the classroom. This learning activity would be a great opportunity for students to practice the informal vocabulary used to describe attributes of the measurement of objects.

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT (0) 11 :
11 ) Identify symbols, customs, famous individuals, and celebrations representative of our state and nation. (Alabama)

Examples: symbols—United States flag, Alabama flag, bald eagle (Alabama)

customs—pledging allegiance to the United States flag, singing "The Star-Spangled Banner"

individuals—George Washington; Abraham Lincoln; Squanto; Martin Luther King, Jr.

celebrations—Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Veterans Day

[DLIT] (0) 14 :
8) Present information from a variety of digital resources.

[DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

Subject: Social Studies (K), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Proud to be an American
Description:

Popplet is a tool for creating digital graphic organizers. Research tells us that students can only process about 5-9 bits of information at a time.  Graphic organizers help our students chunk large amounts of information into more manageable pieces for processing.  

In this learning asset, Popplet will be used in the closing activity to help students organize symbols of our nation.   




ALEX Learning Activities: 4

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 7 :
1) List the sequence of events required to solve problems.

Examples: Tying shoes, making a sandwich, brushing teeth.

[DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

[DLIT] (0) 19 :
13) Use a design process in a guided setting to create an artifact or solve a problem.

Example: Problem - understanding locations on the school campus. Solution - draw paper or digital maps of the school.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 2 Course A Lesson 12: Ocean Scene with Loops (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursea/12/
Description:

Students learn to draw images by looping simple sequences of instructions. Loops are used to create patterns. At the end of this stage, students will be given the opportunity to create their own images using loops. This lesson gives a different perspective on how loops can create things in programming. Students can also reflect on the inefficiency of programming without loops in this lesson because of how many blocks the program would require without the help of repeat loops.

Note: You must create a free account to access this and use this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 7 :
1) List the sequence of events required to solve problems.

Examples: Tying shoes, making a sandwich, brushing teeth.

[DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 2 Course A Lesson 13: The Big Event, Jr. (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursea/13/
Description:

Events are a great way to add variety to a pre-written algorithm. Sometimes you want your program to be able to respond to the user exactly when the user wants it to. That is what events are for in coding.

Students will learn to distinguish events from actions. The students will see activities interrupted by having a "button" pressed on a paper remote. When seeing this event, the class will react with a unique action. Events are widely used in programming and should be easily recognizable after this lesson.

Note: You must create a free account to access this and use this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 7 :
1) List the sequence of events required to solve problems.

Examples: Tying shoes, making a sandwich, brushing teeth.

[DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 2 Course A Lesson 14: On the Move with Events (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursea/14/
Description:

In this online activity, students will have the opportunity to learn how to use events in Play Lab and to apply all of the coding skills they've learned to create an animated game. It's time to get creative and make a story in the Code.org Play Lab!

Students will further develop their understanding of events using Play Lab today. Events are very common in most computer programs. In this activity, students will use events to make a character move around the screen, make noises, and change backgrounds based on user-initiated events.

Note: You must create a free account to access this and use this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 7 :
1) List the sequence of events required to solve problems.

Examples: Tying shoes, making a sandwich, brushing teeth.

[DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 2 Course A Lesson 6: Programming with Angry Birds (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursea/6/
Description:

Using characters from the game Angry Birds, students will develop sequential algorithms to move a bird from one side of a maze to the pig at the other side. To do this, they will stack code blocks together in a linear sequence, making them move straight, turn left, or turn right. In this lesson, students will develop programming skills on a computer platform. The block-based format of these puzzles helps students learn about sequence and concepts, without having to worry about perfecting syntax.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 7 :
1) List the sequence of events required to solve problems.

Examples: Tying shoes, making a sandwich, brushing teeth.

[DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 2 Course A Lesson 7: Programming with Harvester (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursea/7/
Description:

Students will apply the programming concepts that they have learned to the Harvester environment. Now, instead of just getting the character to a goal, students have to collect corn using a new block. Students will continue to develop sequential algorithm skills and start using the debugging process. In this lesson, students will develop debugging skills and will continue developing their programming skills.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 7 :
1) List the sequence of events required to solve problems.

Examples: Tying shoes, making a sandwich, brushing teeth.

[DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

[DLIT] (0) 19 :
13) Use a design process in a guided setting to create an artifact or solve a problem.

Example: Problem - understanding locations on the school campus. Solution - draw paper or digital maps of the school.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 2 Course A Lesson 10: Loops with Harvester (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursea/10/
Description:

Building on the concept of repeating instructions from "Happy Loops", (Lesson 9 - precedes this lesson in Code.org Course A 2018 curriculum) this lesson will have students using loops to pick corn more efficiently on Code.org. In this lesson, students learn more about loops and how to implement them in Blockly code. Using loops is an important skill in programming because manually repeating commands is tedious and inefficient. With the Code.org puzzles, students will learn to add instructions to existing loops, gather repeated code into loops, and recognize patterns that need to be looped.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (0) 7 :
1) List the sequence of events required to solve problems.

Examples: Tying shoes, making a sandwich, brushing teeth.

[DLIT] (0) 16 :
10) Collect data and organize it in a chart or graph collaboratively.

[DLIT] (0) 19 :
13) Use a design process in a guided setting to create an artifact or solve a problem.

Example: Problem - understanding locations on the school campus. Solution - draw paper or digital maps of the school.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (K)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 2 Course A Lesson 11: Loops with Laurel (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursea/11/
Description:

In this lesson, students continue learning the concept of loops. In the previous lesson, students were introduced to loops by moving through a maze and picking corn. Here, loops are used to collect treasure in open cave spaces.

This lesson gives students more practice with loops and introduces a new block, get treasure. The block works just like pick corn did in Harvester. These puzzles are more open, giving students more flexibility for their final solutions.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 7

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