ALEX Resources

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Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (3)


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 21 :
15) Interpret data displayed in a chart.

Example: Using charts which depict data students interpret the data either verbally or in written form (which has more, less, are equal).

[MA2015] (1) 18 :
18 ) Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another. [1-MD4]

[SC2015] (1) 9 :
9 ) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

[DLIT] (1) 20 :
14) Discuss the purpose of collecting and organizing data.

[DLIT] (1) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (1) 7 :
1) Classify and sort information into logical order with and without a computer.

Examples: Sort by shape, color, or other attribute; sort A-Z.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1), Mathematics (1), Science (1)
Title: Not Enough Hours in the Day? Daylight Data Collection
Description:

Students and teacher collaboratively collect and organize data on the length of days throughout the year and analyze patterns that they see. Students and teacher will create a digital spreadsheet and a connected chart in order to reflect and make observations while analyzing the data represented in chart format.

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS COS Resource Development Summit.




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 7 :
1) Classify and sort information into logical order with and without a computer.

Examples: Sort by shape, color, or other attribute; sort A-Z.

[DLIT] (1) 8 :
2) Order events into a logical sequence or algorithm.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, sequence of instruction.

[DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (1) 20 :
14) Discuss the purpose of collecting and organizing data.

[DLIT] (1) 25 :
19) Identify and revise problem-solving strategies to solve a simple problem.

Examples: Scientific method, visual images or mind pictures, look for patterns, systematic list.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 3 Course B Lesson 8: My Loopy Robotic Friends Jr. (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/courseb/8/
Description:

Building on the initial "My Robotic Friends" activity, students tackle larger and more complicated designs. In order to program their "robots" to complete these bigger designs, students will need to identify repeated patterns in their instructions that could be replaced with a loop.

This lesson serves as a reintroduction to loops, using the now familiar set of "robot" programming instructions. Students will develop critical thinking skills by looking for patterns of repetition in the movements of classmates and determining how to simplify those repeated patterns using loops.

Students will be able to:
- Identify repeated patterns in code that could be replaced with a loop.
- Write instructions that use loops to repeat patterns.

Note: You must create a free account to access this and use this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 7 :
1) Classify and sort information into logical order with and without a computer.

Examples: Sort by shape, color, or other attribute; sort A-Z.

[DLIT] (1) 8 :
2) Order events into a logical sequence or algorithm.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, sequence of instruction.

[DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (1) 20 :
14) Discuss the purpose of collecting and organizing data.

[DLIT] (1) 25 :
19) Identify and revise problem-solving strategies to solve a simple problem.

Examples: Scientific method, visual images or mind pictures, look for patterns, systematic list.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 3 Course B Lesson 11: Drawing Gardens with Loops (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/courseb/11/
Description:

Students learn to draw images by looping simple sequences of instructions. In the previous online lesson, loops were used to traverse a maze and collect treasure. Here, students use loops to create patterns. At the end of this stage, students will be given the opportunity to create their own images using loops.

This lesson gives a different perspective on how loops can create things in programming. Students will test their critical thinking skills by evaluating given code and determining what needs to be added in order to solve the puzzle. Students can also reflect on the inefficiency of programming without loops here because of how many blocks the program would require without the help of repeat loops.

Students will be able to:
- Count the number of times an action should be repeated and represent it as a loop.
- Decompose a shape into its largest repeatable sequence.
- Create a program that draws complex shapes by repeating simple sequences.

Note: You must create a free account to access and use this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (1) 7 :
1) Classify and sort information into logical order with and without a computer.

Examples: Sort by shape, color, or other attribute; sort A-Z.

[DLIT] (1) 8 :
2) Order events into a logical sequence or algorithm.

Examples: Unplugged coding activities, sequence of instruction.

[DLIT] (1) 9 :
3) Construct elements of a simple computer program in collaboration with others.

Examples: Block programming, basic robotics, unplugged programming.

[DLIT] (1) 20 :
14) Discuss the purpose of collecting and organizing data.

[DLIT] (1) 25 :
19) Identify and revise problem-solving strategies to solve a simple problem.

Examples: Scientific method, visual images or mind pictures, look for patterns, systematic list.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (1)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 3 Course B Lesson 13: A Royal Battle with Events (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/courseb/13/
Description:

In this online activity, students will have the opportunity to learn how to use events in Play Lab and apply all of the coding skills that they've learned to create an animated game. It's time to get creative and make a game in Play Lab!

Students will start by training the knight to move when an arrow key is pressed, then end with the opportunity to showcase the rest of the skills that they learned throughout this course, including sequence and looping, as part of the final free play puzzle.

Students will be able to:
- Identify actions that correlate to input events.
- Create an animated, interactive story using sequences and event-handlers.
- Share a creative artifact with other students.

Note: You must create a free account to access and use this resource. 



ALEX Classroom Resources: 3

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