ALEX Resources

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Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (6)


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] LWT2 (2) 6 :
6 ) Identify states, continents, oceans, and the equator using maps, globes, and technology.

•  Identifying map elements, including title, legend, compass rose, and scale
•  Identifying the intermediate directions of northeast, southeast, northwest, and southwest
•  Recognizing technological resources such as a virtual globe, satellite images, and radar
•  Locating points on a grid
[ELA2015] (2) 29 :
29 ) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about Grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. [SL.2.1]

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.2.1a]

b. Build on others' talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others. [SL.2.1b]

c. Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion. [SL.2.1c]

[ELA2015] (2) 31 :
31 ) Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue. [SL.2.3]

[DLIT] (2) 15 :
9) Use a variety of digital tools to connect with other learners.

Examples: Online conferences, blogs, collaborative documents.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

[DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

Subject: Social Studies (2), English Language Arts (2), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Where in the World Are You? A Mystery Skype
Description:

Students will participate in a collaborative guessing game with another classroom from a "mystery place" somewhere on the globe through a video conference. This game helps students learn about geography, culture, and the similarities and differences of how children live all over the world. Students are to prepare questions ahead of time to help them pinpoint their location. These questions are not only focused on geography but culture as well. While honing their questioning and conversation skills each class takes turns answering questions about each other until their location has been pinpointed.

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS COS Resource Development Summit.




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: We, the Digital Citizens
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/we-the-digital-citizens
Description:

Students explore the amazing possibilities that come with using technology. They'll also learn from the Digital Citizens, who take a pledge to be safe, responsible, and respectful when traveling through the online world.

Students will be able to:
  • Understand that being a good digital citizen means being safe and responsible online.
  • Take a pledge to be a good digital citizen.

Users will need to create a free account before accessing this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Digital Trails
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/digital-trails
Description:

Does what you do online always stay online? Students learn that the information they share online leaves a digital footprint or "trail." Depending on how they manage it, this trail can be big or small, and harmful or helpful. Students compare different trails and think critically about what kinds of information they want to leave behind.

Students will be able to:
  • Learn that the information they share online leaves a digital footprint or "trail"
  • Explore what information is OK to be shared online

User will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

[DLIT] (2) 14 :
8) Interpret ways in which computing devices have influenced people's lives.

Example: Discuss tasks completed daily in which some type of device is used to make the tasks easier (calculator, microwave to quickly heat food, mobile phone for instant communication).

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Who Is In Your Online Community?
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/who-is-in-your-online-community
Description:

We are all connected via the internet! By learning the Rings of Responsibility, students explore how the internet connects us to people in our community and throughout the world. Help your students think critically about the different ways they connect with others, both in-person and online.

Students will be able to:
  • Compare and contrast how they are connected to different people and places, in person and on the internet
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how people can connect on the internet

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Putting a STOP to Online Meanness
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/putting-a-stop-to-online-meanness
Description:

The internet is filled with all kinds of interesting people, but sometimes, some of them can be mean to each other. With this role play, help your students understand why it's often easier to be mean online than in person, and how to deal with online meanness when they see it.

Students will be able to:
  • Understand what online meanness can look like and how it can make people feel
  • Identify ways to respond to mean words online, using S-T-O-P

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 11 :
5) Cite media and/or owners of digital content at an age-appropriate level.

Example: Basic website citation.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Let's Give Credit!
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/lets-give-credit
Description:

With so much information at our fingertips, students learn what it means to "give credit" when using content they find online. Taking on the role of a detective, students learn why it's important to give credit and the right ways to do it when they use words, images, or ideas that belong to others.

Students will be able to:
  • Explain how giving credit is a sign of respect for people's work
  • Learn how to give credit in their schoolwork for the content they use from the internet

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (2) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

[DLIT] (2) 12 :
6) Demonstrate appropriate behaviors for communicating in a digital environment.

Example: netiquette.

[DLIT] (2) 13 :
7) List positive and negative impacts of digital communication.

Example: Anything posted or communicated electronically may be easily reproduced and could remain a positive or negative part of your digital identity/footprint.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 4 Course C Lesson 13: Screen Out the Mean (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursec/13/
Description:

This lesson helps children to recognize that it is essential to tell a trusted adult if something online makes them feel angry, sad, or scared.

Students learn that other people can sometimes act like bullies when they are online. They will explore what cyber-bullying means and what they can do when they encounter it. After reading a scenario about mean online behavior, students discuss what cyber-bullying is, how it can make people feel, and how to respond. Finally, they use their knowledge to create a simple tip sheet on cyber-bullying in their journal.

Students may not ever have the misfortune of experiencing cyber-bullying, but we want to make sure that the students are prepared for and knowledgeable about it, in case they ever witness it during an online situation. Students will learn how to identify cyber-bullying and what steps they should take to make it stop. This may become helpful in later puzzles when students have the opportunity to share their work. If someone negatively responds to a student's work, this lesson will provide them with the tools that they need to handle the situation.

Students will be able to:
- analyze online behaviors that could be considered cyber-bullying.
- explain how to deal with a cyber-bullying situation.
- recognize the importance of engaging a trusted adult if the student experienced cyber-bullying.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 6

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