ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (6) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (14) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (4)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 16 :
16 ) Determine the impact of population growth on cities, major road systems, demographics, natural resources, and the natural environment of Alabama during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

•  Describing how technological advancements brought change to Alabamians, including the telephone; refrigerator; automobile; television; and wireless, Internet, and space technologies
•  Relating Alabama's economy to the influence of foreign-based industry, including the automobile industry
[DLIT] (4) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), or Social Studies (4)
Title: What if Nothing Ever Changed?
Description:

Imagine if the world as you know it never changed. Students will embark on a journey back in time and research what life in Alabama looked like in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Students will compare and contrast the information they research to their present day lives. Students will then identify how technological advancements changed life for Alabamians and reflect on how they feel their life would be today if things never changed. Students will create an Adobe Spark digital story to communicate their researched information and personal reflections.

This resource was created as a result of the Alabama Technology in Motion Partnership.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.4.3]

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.4.3a]

b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. [W.4.3b]

c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. [W.4.3c]

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. [W.4.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.4.3e]

[ELA2015] (4) 35 :
35 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.4.4]

[SS2010] ALA (4) 6 :
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), or English Language Arts (4), or Social Studies (4)
Title: The Slave Experience: A Look at a Slave's Life in the Nineteenth Century
Description:

Students will explore two NCSS Notable Trade Books and a newspaper advertisement to develop an understanding of what life was like for slaves in the nineteenth century.  Students will use their understanding to write a narrative story about being a slave in the nineteenth century. Students will use the website MyStorybook to create and publish their stories.

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[ELA2015] (4) 1 :
1 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RL.4.1]

[ELA2015] (4) 6 :
6 ) Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations. [RL.4.6]

[ELA2015] (4) 3 :
3 ) Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions). [RL.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 8 :
8 ) Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures. [RL.4.9]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 8 :
8 ) Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures. [RL.4.9]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 8 :
8 ) Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures. [RL.4.9]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 8 :
8 ) Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures. [RL.4.9]

[ELA2015] (4) 8 :
8 ) Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures. [RL.4.9]

[ELA2015] (4) 20 :
20 ) Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. [RF.4.3]

a. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context. [RF.4.3a]

[ELA2015] (4) 21 :
21 ) Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. [RF.4.4]

a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. [RF.4.4a]

b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. [RF.4.4b]

c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. [RF.4.4c]

[ELA2015] (4) 25 :
25 ) Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 22-24 above.) [W.4.4]

[ELA2015] (4) 34 :
34 ) Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points. [SL.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 38 :
38 ) Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. [L.4.1]

a. Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why). [L.4.1a]

b. Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses. [L.4.1b]

c. Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions. [L.4.1c]

d. Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag). [L.4.1d]

e. Form and use prepositional phrases. [L.4.1e]

f. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.* [L.4.1f]

g. Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to, too, two; there, their).* [L.4.1g]

[ELA2015] (4) 39 :
39 ) Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.4.2]

a. Use correct capitalization. [L.4.2a]

b. Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text. [L.4.2b]

c. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence. [L.4.2c]

d. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed. [L.4.2d]

[ELA2015] (4) 40 :
40 ) Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. [L.4.3]

a. Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely.* [L.4.3a]

b. Choose punctuation for effect.* [L.4.3b]

c. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion). [L.4.3c]

[ELA2015] (4) 43 :
43 ) Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being (e.g., quizzed, whined, stammered) and that are basic to a particular topic (e.g., wildlife, conservation, and endangered when discussing animal preservation). [L.4.6]

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), or English Language Arts (4)
Title: What's the Theme?
Description:

This lesson is a beginning lesson to use to introduce the skill of theme. Students will read two picture books "Ranita, the Frog Princess" and "Frankly, I Never Wanted to Kiss Anybody!", determine the theme for each, and then compare them in a writing assignment.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[ELA2015] (4) 1 :
1 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RL.4.1]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 35 :
35 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.4.4]

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), or English Language Arts (4)
Title: Book Boxes: Analyzing Elements of a Story
Description:

In this lesson, students will listen to a read aloud and view a model of the project expected related to the first read aloud.  Students will then complete a group project based on a story read as a class. (This can be done as a read aloud or in literature circle groups.)  The books used in this particular activity are Bud, Not Buddy and The Watsons go to Birmingham.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[MA2015] (4) 26 :
26 ) Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures. [4-G1]

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), or Mathematics (4)
Title: Wanted: Angles of all Sizes!
Description:

In this lesson, students will explore straight, right, acute and obtuse angles. Students will go to the playground to search for angles. The students will use digital cameras to record their findings. They will use their findings to create a PowerPoint to present to the class.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 20 :
14) Type 20 words per minute with 95% accuracy using appropriate keyboarding techniques.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[ELA2015] (4) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.4.3]

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.4.3a]

b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. [W.4.3b]

c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. [W.4.3c]

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. [W.4.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.4.3e]

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), or English Language Arts (4)
Title: Story Add-Ons
Description:

This is a technology-rich lesson plan which allows students to explore proper language conventions while utilizing portable keyboards, chromebooks, or laptops for word processing.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 14 :
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
[DLIT] (4) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

Subject: Social Studies (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Exploring the Civil Rights Movement Through Primary Source Photography
Description:

Fodey is a newspaper clip generator allows students to generate a newspaper clip. Simply enter the name of newspaper, the publish date, the headline and then the story. You are done! You can download your article as an image.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 14 :
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

Subject: Social Studies (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: A moment in time
Description:

Timetoast is an online tool used to make and share timelines created by individuals. Teachers can use this tool to have students create a timeline of a particular event or span of time.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 8 :
8 ) Explain Alabama's economic and military role during the Civil War.

Examples: economic—production of iron products, munitions, textiles, and ships

military—provision of military supplies through the Port of Mobile, provision of an armament center at Selma

•  Recognizing military leaders from Alabama during the Civil War
•  Comparing roles of women on the home front and the battlefront during and after the Civil War
•  Explaining economic conditions as a result of the Civil War, including the collapse of the economic structure, destruction of the transportation infrastructure, and high casualty rates
[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

Subject: Social Studies (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: History Goes High-Tech with Educreations
Description:

Educreations turns your iPad into a recordable whiteboard. Creating a great video tutorial is as simple as touching, tapping and talking.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (4) 9 :
9 ) Examine evidence to support an argument that the internal and external structures of plants (e.g., thorns, leaves, stems, roots, colored petals, xylem, phloem) and animals (e.g., heart, stomach, lung, brain, skin) function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

[DLIT] (4) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (4) 21 :
15) Conduct complex keyword searches to produce valid, appropriate results and evaluate results for accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness.

Examples: Search techniques, check for credibility and validity.

Subject: Science (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Plants 101
Description:

A Voicethread is a media tool that allows users to create a media board. The application allows users to add images, text, recordings, and videos. The Voicethreads can also be shared for other users of Voicethread to view and add comments. Students will use Voicethread to design a media board. Students will add pictures of plant structures such as: root, stem, leaves, and flowers. Students will then add pictures of each plant structure along with a description of the structures function. The Voicethread will be used as an assessment of the students understanding of the plants structures functions.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (4) 9 :
9 ) Examine evidence to support an argument that the internal and external structures of plants (e.g., thorns, leaves, stems, roots, colored petals, xylem, phloem) and animals (e.g., heart, stomach, lung, brain, skin) function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

[SC2015] (5) 9 :
9 ) Construct an illustration to explain how plants use light energy to convert carbon dioxide and water into a storable fuel, carbohydrates, and a waste product, oxygen, during the process of photosynthesis.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (5) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (5) 22 :
16) Use advanced features of digital tools and media-rich resources to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs, persuades, and/or entertains.

[DLIT] (5) 23 :
17) Publish organized information in different ways to make it more useful or relevant.

Examples: Infographic, student created website.

Subject: Science (4 - 5), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4 - 5)
Title: Exploring Parts of Plants with Evernote
Description: Evernote is an online storage system allowing users to create, search, and present on one workspace. Description provided by evernote.com.


   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (3) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (3) 19 :
13) Communicate key ideas and details collaboratively in a way that informs, persuades, and/or entertains, using digital tools.

Example: Create a digital presentation to persuade school administrators to allow additional time for lunch.

[DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (5) 22 :
16) Use advanced features of digital tools and media-rich resources to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs, persuades, and/or entertains.

[DLIT] (6) 22 :
16) Communicate and/or publish collaboratively to inform others from a variety of backgrounds and cultures about issues and problems.

[DLIT] (7) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 22 :
16) Construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Examples: Design a multi-media children's e-book with an appropriate readability level.

[DLIT] (7) 23 :
17) Publish content to be available for external feedback.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (8) 23 :
17) Communicate and publish individually or collaboratively to persuade peers, experts, or community about issues and problems.

[DLIT] (9-12) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (9-12) 31 :
25) Utilize a variety of digital tools to create digital artifacts across content areas.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 12)
Title: Using Smore to Create Digital 'How-To' Guides
Description:

Smore is a digital flyer creator.  Once a digital flyer is created with Smore, the user can share the flyer with social media sites, email a link or embed the flyer into a webpage.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (3) 19 :
13) Communicate key ideas and details collaboratively in a way that informs, persuades, and/or entertains, using digital tools.

Example: Create a digital presentation to persuade school administrators to allow additional time for lunch.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (5) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[SS2010] USS5 (5) 7 :
7 ) Determine causes and events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Intolerable Acts, the Boston Massacre, and the Boston Tea Party.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 6), Social Studies (5)
Title: Introducing the American Revolution
Description:

This tool allows students to combine speaking with pictures to share information about a topic with the teacher and the class. It combines the use of visual and audible learning, as well as collaboration with peers.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 40 :
40 ) Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. [L.4.3]

a. Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely.* [L.4.3a]

b. Choose punctuation for effect.* [L.4.3b]

c. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion). [L.4.3c]

[MA2015] (4) 15 :
15 ) Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction by a whole number. [4-NF4]

a. Understand a fraction a/b as a multiple of 1/b. [4-NF4a]

Example: Use a visual fraction model to represent 5/4 as the product 5 x (1/4), recording the conclusion by the equation 5/4 = 5 x (1/4).

b. Understand a multiple of a/b as a multiple of 1/b, and use this understanding to multiply a fraction by a whole number. [4-NF4b]

Example: Use a visual fraction model to express 3 x (2/5) as 6 x (1/5), recognizing this product as 6/5. (In general, n x (a/b) = (nxa)/b.)

c. Solve word problems involving multiplication of a fraction by a whole number, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem. [4-NF4c]

Example: If each person at a party will eat 3/8 of a pound of roast beef, and there will be 5 people at the party, how many pounds of roast beef will be needed' Between which two whole numbers does your answer lie'

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

Subject: English Language Arts (4), Mathematics (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Fraction's Narration
Description:

Educreations is a digital white board where students can draw, narrate, and view different lessons. Students can create their own lessons or view ones that other people have made.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 7 :
7 ) Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text. [RL.4.7]

[ELA2015] (4) 38 :
38 ) Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. [L.4.1]

a. Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why). [L.4.1a]

b. Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses. [L.4.1b]

c. Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions. [L.4.1c]

d. Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag). [L.4.1d]

e. Form and use prepositional phrases. [L.4.1e]

f. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.* [L.4.1f]

g. Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to, too, two; there, their).* [L.4.1g]

[ELA2015] (4) 39 :
39 ) Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.4.2]

a. Use correct capitalization. [L.4.2a]

b. Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text. [L.4.2b]

c. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence. [L.4.2c]

d. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed. [L.4.2d]

[DLIT] (4) 21 :
15) Conduct complex keyword searches to produce valid, appropriate results and evaluate results for accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness.

Examples: Search techniques, check for credibility and validity.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (4) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: English Language Arts (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Recreate a Book Cover!
Description:

This tool, located on readwritethink.org, can be a useful resource for students. Students can create their own book covers. Students can create a front book cover, a full  dust jacket, or a front and back cover. Students can “draw” their own pictures and can add text to the covers. This tool is relatively easy for students to use, and would be a good tool for any grade.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 3 :
3 ) Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions). [RL.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 7 :
7 ) Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text. [RL.4.7]

[ELA2015] (4) 27 :
27 ) With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting. [W.4.6]

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: English Language Arts (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Untangling the Web
Description:

Doodle Splash is an online interactive that allows students to incorporate their drawings with their writing.  This site allows them to visualize their ideas and prompts them to write about those ideas.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 23 :
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.4.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.4.2a]

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. [W.4.2b]

c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because). [W.4.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.4.2d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. [W.4.2e]

[ELA2015] (4) 32 :
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.4.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.4.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.4.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others. [SL.4.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. [SL.4.1d]

[ELA2015] (4) 35 :
35 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.4.4]

[SS2010] ALA (4) 14 :
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: English Language Arts (4), Social Studies (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: I Have a Dream
Description:

The tool used is a video from schooltube.com. The video shows students taking on the roles of influential African Americans in the United States. At the end, the students are reciting the "I Have a Dream" speech by Martin Luther King Jr.  




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 19 :
13) Communicate key ideas and details collaboratively in a way that informs, persuades, and/or entertains, using digital tools.

Example: Create a digital presentation to persuade school administrators to allow additional time for lunch.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 4)
Title: Fun with Word Clouds
Description:

Tagxedo turns words -- famous speeches, news articles, slogans and themes, even your love letters -- into a visually stunning word cloud, words individually sized appropriately to highlight the frequencies of occurrence within the body of text.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 14 :
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 1 :
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

Subject: Social Studies (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: I Have a Dream, Martin Luther King Jr.
Description:

Blabberize will allow students to take their own voice and add it to a picture that talks.

In this lesson, students will create their own "I Have a Dream" speeches and put them with a picture of how they may see themselves in the future (example: a picture of a pilot, nurse, teacher....) The picture will talk with the words of the student's own speech.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (0) 3 :
3 ) With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. [RL.K.3]

[ELA2015] (0) 11 :
11 ) With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. [RI.K.2]

[ELA2015] (0) 28 :
28 ) With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. [W.K.6]

[ELA2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details. [RL.1.3]

[ELA2015] (1) 11 :
11 ) Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. [RI.1.2]

[ELA2015] (1) 28 :
28 ) With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. [W.1.6]

[ELA2015] (1) 35 :
35 ) Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. [SL.1.5]

[ELA2015] (2) 26 :
26 ) With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. [W.2.6]

[ELA2015] (2) 30 :
30 ) Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. [SL.2.2]

[ELA2015] (3) 5 :
5 ) Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. [RL.3.5]

[ELA2015] (3) 32 :
32 ) Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. [SL.3.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 16 :
16 ) Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. [RI.4.7]

[ELA2015] (5) 5 :
5 ) Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem. [RL.5.5]

[ELA2015] (5) 36 :
36 ) Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes. [SL.5.5]

[ELA2015] (6) 3 :
3 ) Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution. [RL.6.3]

[ELA2015] (6) 35 :
35 ) Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information. [SL.6.5]

[ELA2015] (7) 3 :
3 ) Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). [RL.7.3]

[ELA2015] (7) 34 :
34 ) Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points. [SL.7.5]

[ELA2015] (8) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.8.2]

[ELA2015] (8) 34 :
34 ) Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. [SL.8.5]

[ELA2015] (9) 3 :
3 ) Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. [RL.9-10.3]

[ELA2015] (9) 34 :
34 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.9-10.5]

[ELA2015] (10) 3 :
3 ) Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. [RL.9-10.3]

[ELA2015] (10) 35 :
35 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.9-10.5]

[ELA2015] (11) 3 :
3 ) Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). [RL.11-12.3]

[ELA2015] (11) 33 :
33 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.11-12.5]

[ELA2015] (12) 3 :
3 ) Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). [RL.11-12.3]

[ELA2015] (12) 33 :
33 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.11-12.5]

[DLIT] (2) 20 :
14) Collect, create, and organize data in a digital chart or graph.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[DLIT] (5) 23 :
17) Publish organized information in different ways to make it more useful or relevant.

Examples: Infographic, student created website.

[DLIT] (6) 7 :
1) Remove background details from an everyday process to highlight essential properties.

Examples: When making a sandwich, the type of bread, condiments, meats, and/or vegetables do not affect the fact that one is making a sandwich.

Subject: English Language Arts (K - 12), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2 - 6)
Title: Interactive Plot Diagram
Description:

This organizational tool for grades K-12 uses the plot diagram pyramid to map events in a story.  You can choose beginning, middle, and end for younger learners or exposition, climax, and resolution for older learners.  The mapping tool allows readers to recreate a story you have taught in class, or writers to map out the ideas for an original piece. 




ALEX Learning Activities: 14

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (5) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (5) 20 :
14) Analyze the impact of social media on individuals, families, and society.

[DLIT] (5) 22 :
16) Use advanced features of digital tools and media-rich resources to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs, persuades, and/or entertains.

[DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4 - 6)
Title: Behaving Ethically Online: Ethics and Empathy
URL: http://mediasmarts.ca/teacher-resources/behaving-ethically-online-ethics-empathy
Description:

In this lesson, students are introduced to the idea that “hot” emotional states such as anger or excitement can make it harder for them to control how they act. They also discuss the concept of empathy and look at the ways in which digital communication can make it harder to feel empathy for other people. Students then read scenarios that portray two sides of an online conflict and consider how to resolve them, using their discussion to build a list of tools for emotional management and conflict resolution online. Finally, students create a media product that explains and reminds them of one of those tools.

Students will:



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 6 Course E Lesson 23: Explore Project Ideas (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursee/23/
Description:

The next four lessons provide an opportunity for students to put their coding skills to use in a capstone project. This project will help individuals gain experience with coding and produce an exemplar to share with peers and loved ones. Intended to be a multi-lesson or multi-week experience, students will spend time exploring brainstorming, learning about the design process, building, and presenting their final work.

In the explore stage, students will play with pre-built examples of projects in both Artist and Sprite Lab for inspiration. Next, students will learn about the design process and how to implement it in their own projects. They will then be given the space to create their own project in Artist, Sprite Lab, or another interface that they have become familiar with (this is likely the longest stage of the project). Finally, students will be able to present finished work to their peers.

This lesson will inspire students with realistic and entertaining ideas for their culminating projects.

Students will be able to:
- learn to plan in advance for an ongoing assignment.
- explain how system limitations can affect project design.
- describe how compromise can help keep a project on track and inspire creativity.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 8 :
2) Formulate a list of sub-problems to consider while addressing a larger problem.

Examples: Problem - a multi-step math problem; sub-problem - steps to solve.
Problem - light bulb does not light; sub-problem - steps to resolve why.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 21 :
15) Conduct complex keyword searches to produce valid, appropriate results and evaluate results for accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness.

Examples: Search techniques, check for credibility and validity.

[DLIT] (4) 27 :
21) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a simple problem.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 6 Course E Lesson 24: The Design Process (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursee/24/
Description:

Over the course of four lessons, students will be building up to programming a project of their own design using either Sprite Lab or Artist as their programming environment. In this portion of the project, students will learn about the design process and how to implement it in their own projects. The lesson guide for all four stages of the process can be found in the first stage of this project process here.

Students may be ready to jump straight into building their projects, but this lesson will help shape their ideas into plans. This structure will keep the dreamers grounded and illuminate a path for those feeling left in the dark.

Students will be able to:
- shape ideas into reasonable goals and plans.
- recognize any potential obstacles such as time constraints or bugs.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 6 Course E Lesson 26: Present Your Project (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursee/26/
Description:

Over the course of four lessons, students will be building up to programming a project of their own design using either Sprite Lab or Artist as their programming environment. Finally, students will be able to present their finished work to their peers or share with their loved ones with a special link. The lesson guide for all four stages of the process can be found in the first stage of this project process here.

At this point, students have worked very hard on their projects, so this lesson is meant to offer a space for the students to share their projects. This lesson will build a supportive community where students will build their own confidence and feel connected to their hardworking peers.

Students will be able to:
- indicate where each criterion point from the rubric is satisfied in the code for the finished culminating project.
- articulate the design process and how it helped shape the finished culminating project.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 4

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