ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Lesson Plans (3) A detailed description of the instruction for teaching one or more concepts or skills. Learning Activities (6) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (5)


ALEX Lesson Plans  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.4.3]

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.4.3a]

b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. [W.4.3b]

c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. [W.4.3c]

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. [W.4.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.4.3e]

[SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
[DLIT] (4) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), or English Language Arts (4), or Social Studies (4)
Title: What is the Price of Land?
Description:

In this lesson, students will define conflict as it relates to Native American land conflict during the early nineteenth century.  Students will compare Native Americans' and settlers' perspectives on land.  Students will write a narrative writing as a Creek Chief watching the settlers move into their territory, focusing on how this makes them feel and how these events will change the lives of his/her people. 

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 24 :
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.4.3]

a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.4.3a]

b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. [W.4.3b]

c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. [W.4.3c]

d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. [W.4.3d]

e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. [W.4.3e]

[ELA2015] (4) 35 :
35 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.4.4]

[SS2010] ALA (4) 6 :
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), or English Language Arts (4), or Social Studies (4)
Title: The Slave Experience: A Look at a Slave's Life in the Nineteenth Century
Description:

Students will explore two NCSS Notable Trade Books and a newspaper advertisement to develop an understanding of what life was like for slaves in the nineteenth century.  Students will use their understanding to write a narrative story about being a slave in the nineteenth century. Students will use the website MyStorybook to create and publish their stories.

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (3) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (3) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[ELA2015] (4) 35 :
35 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.4.4]

[SS2010] GHS (3) 13 :
13 ) Describe prehistoric and historic American Indian cultures, governments, and economics in Alabama. (Alabama)

Examples: prehistoric—Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Woodland, Mississippian

historic—Choctaw, Chickasaw, Cherokee, Creek (Alabama)

•  Identifying roles of archaeologists and paleontologists
[SS2010] ALA (4) 2 :
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 4), or English Language Arts (4), or Social Studies (3 - 4)
Title: Alabama's Prehistoric Indians
Description:

In this seven-day lesson, students will explore, in depth, the lives of prehistoric Indians who lived in Alabama. Then students, working in cooperative groups, will choose one tribe to focus on as they create a musical parody about the tribe they have chosen.




ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[SS2010] ALA (4) 14 :
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), Social Studies (4)
Title: Beyond the Classroom: A Virtual Field Trip to the Civil Rights Movement
Description:

The Civil Rights Movement had a tremendous impact on Alabama. During a Civil Rights learning unit students will learn a tremendous amount regarding Alabama’s history in making progress towards racial equality. Primary sources can strengthen student understanding.

Google Expedition application, and virtual reality tools of the like, offer students an opportunity for increased comprehension by providing context to the learning content. There is a host of tours to search and engage with in order to break down the classroom walls and offer students an experience beyond the classroom.  Each tour is created with background information and leveled questions for the guide/teacher.

This activity was demonstrated during the Exploring Today's Classroom (ETC) Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 14 :
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

Subject: Social Studies (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: A moment in time
Description:

Timetoast is an online tool used to make and share timelines created by individuals. Teachers can use this tool to have students create a timeline of a particular event or span of time.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SS2010] ALA (4) 8 :
8 ) Explain Alabama's economic and military role during the Civil War.

Examples: economic—production of iron products, munitions, textiles, and ships

military—provision of military supplies through the Port of Mobile, provision of an armament center at Selma

•  Recognizing military leaders from Alabama during the Civil War
•  Comparing roles of women on the home front and the battlefront during and after the Civil War
•  Explaining economic conditions as a result of the Civil War, including the collapse of the economic structure, destruction of the transportation infrastructure, and high casualty rates
[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

Subject: Social Studies (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: History Goes High-Tech with Educreations
Description:

Educreations turns your iPad into a recordable whiteboard. Creating a great video tutorial is as simple as touching, tapping and talking.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [SC2015] (4) 9 :
9 ) Examine evidence to support an argument that the internal and external structures of plants (e.g., thorns, leaves, stems, roots, colored petals, xylem, phloem) and animals (e.g., heart, stomach, lung, brain, skin) function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

[DLIT] (4) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (4) 21 :
15) Conduct complex keyword searches to produce valid, appropriate results and evaluate results for accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness.

Examples: Search techniques, check for credibility and validity.

Subject: Science (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Plants 101
Description:

A Voicethread is a media tool that allows users to create a media board. The application allows users to add images, text, recordings, and videos. The Voicethreads can also be shared for other users of Voicethread to view and add comments. Students will use Voicethread to design a media board. Students will add pictures of plant structures such as: root, stem, leaves, and flowers. Students will then add pictures of each plant structure along with a description of the structures function. The Voicethread will be used as an assessment of the students understanding of the plants structures functions.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (3) 19 :
13) Communicate key ideas and details collaboratively in a way that informs, persuades, and/or entertains, using digital tools.

Example: Create a digital presentation to persuade school administrators to allow additional time for lunch.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (5) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[SS2010] USS5 (5) 7 :
7 ) Determine causes and events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Intolerable Acts, the Boston Massacre, and the Boston Tea Party.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 6), Social Studies (5)
Title: Introducing the American Revolution
Description:

This tool allows students to combine speaking with pictures to share information about a topic with the teacher and the class. It combines the use of visual and audible learning, as well as collaboration with peers.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 7 :
7 ) Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text. [RL.4.7]

[ELA2015] (4) 38 :
38 ) Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. [L.4.1]

a. Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why). [L.4.1a]

b. Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses. [L.4.1b]

c. Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions. [L.4.1c]

d. Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag). [L.4.1d]

e. Form and use prepositional phrases. [L.4.1e]

f. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.* [L.4.1f]

g. Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to, too, two; there, their).* [L.4.1g]

[ELA2015] (4) 39 :
39 ) Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.4.2]

a. Use correct capitalization. [L.4.2a]

b. Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text. [L.4.2b]

c. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence. [L.4.2c]

d. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed. [L.4.2d]

[DLIT] (4) 21 :
15) Conduct complex keyword searches to produce valid, appropriate results and evaluate results for accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness.

Examples: Search techniques, check for credibility and validity.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (4) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: English Language Arts (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Recreate a Book Cover!
Description:

This tool, located on readwritethink.org, can be a useful resource for students. Students can create their own book covers. Students can create a front book cover, a full  dust jacket, or a front and back cover. Students can “draw” their own pictures and can add text to the covers. This tool is relatively easy for students to use, and would be a good tool for any grade.




ALEX Learning Activities: 6

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: My Media Choices
URL: https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship/lesson/my-media-choices
Description:

We all make choices every day about the media we consume and create. But do kids understand what makes a media choice healthy or not? Hint: It's about more than just screen time. Use the activities in this lesson to give kids a framework for making informed media choices.

Students will be able to:
  • Learn the "What? When? How Much?" framework for describing their media choices.
  • Use this framework and their emotional responses to evaluate how healthy different types of media choices are.
  • Begin to develop their own definition of a healthy media balance.

Users will need to create a free account to access this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 8 :
2) Formulate a list of sub-problems to consider while addressing a larger problem.

Examples: Problem - a multi-step math problem; sub-problem - steps to solve.
Problem - light bulb does not light; sub-problem - steps to resolve why.

[DLIT] (4) 9 :
3) Show that different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.

[DLIT] (4) 10 :
4) Detect and debug logical errors in various basic algorithms.

Example: Trace the path of a set of directions to determine success or failure.

[DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (4) 27 :
21) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a simple problem.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 6 Course E Lesson 19: Determine the Concept (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursee/19/
Description:

This series brings together concepts from previous lessons and gives students a chance to think critically about how they would solve each problem, but without telling them which concept to apply. Students will review basic algorithms, debugging, repeat loops, conditionals, while loops, and functions.

It's important for students to remember that computer science provides plenty of opportunities to be creative. Every topic can be combined with another to make something bigger and better. In this lesson, students will use previously learned concepts together, allowing for a "big picture" view of programming projects. This lesson will also bridge any gaps in understanding of when to use certain programming tools over others.

Students will be able to:
- recognize which programming concept to use to solve a given problem.
- describe the different ways one could solve a given problem.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (4) 27 :
21) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a simple problem.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 6 Course E Lesson 20: Learning Sprite Lab (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursee/20/
Description:

In this lesson, students will learn about the two concepts at the heart of Sprite Lab: sprites and behaviors. Sprites are characters or objects on the screen that students can move, change, and manipulate. Behaviors are actions that sprites will take continuously until they are stopped.

This lesson is designed to introduce students to the core vocabulary of Sprite Lab, and allow them to apply concepts they learned in other environments to this tool. By creating a fish tank, students will begin to form an understanding of the programming model of this tool and explore ways they can use it to express themselves.

Students will be able to:
- define “sprite” as a character or object on the screen that can be moved and changed.
- create a new sprite and choose its appearance.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (4) 27 :
21) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a simple problem.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 6 Course E Lesson 21: Alien Dance Party (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursee/21/
Description:

This lesson features Sprite Lab, a platform where students can create their own alien dance party with interactions between characters and user input. Students will work with events to create game controls.

Students will use events to make characters move around the screen, make noises, and change backgrounds based on user input. This lesson offers a great introduction to events in programming and even gives a chance to show creativity! At the end of the puzzle sequence, students will be presented with the opportunity to share their projects.

Students will be able to:
- identify actions that correlate to input events.
- create an animated, interactive game using sequence and events.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

[DLIT] (4) 19 :
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

[DLIT] (4) 27 :
21) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a simple problem.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 6 Course E Lesson 22: Pet Giraffe (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursee/22/
Description:

Students will use Sprite Lab to play with sprites and their properties. Students will use events, behaviors, and custom code to create their very own pet giraffe that gets hungry, playful, and even filthy!

Students will use events to make characters move around the screen, change size, and change colors based on user input. This lesson offers a great introduction to events in programming and even gives a chance to show creativity!

Students will be able to:
- identify actions that correlate to input events.
- create an animated, interactive game using sequence and events.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 5

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