ALEX Resources

Narrow Results:
Learning Activities (5) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (4)


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[MA2015] (3) 18 :
18 ) Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled bar graphs. [3-MD3]

Example: Draw a bar graph in which each square in the bar graph might represent 5 pets.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4), Mathematics (3)
Title: Graph It!
Description:

This activity guides students through the process of creating a graph of a particular data set. Students can produce a bar graph that compares different categories, a line graph that shows a change in something over time, or a pie graph that shows percentages of a whole. Students will select the most appropriate graph choice, input data, create labels and titles, and make design choices to enhance the graphic representation of the data.

This activity results from the ALEX Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 17 :
11) Discuss the digital divide as unequal access to technology based on differences such as income, education, age, or geographic location and locate resources in the community that can give people access to technology.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: Who Has Access?
Description:

Students will collect and analyze data from the website, Broadband Now, to understand that not everyone has the same level of access to technology in the U.S. based on their geographic location. Data will be collected for each U.S. state and discussed with a partner and the whole class.

This activity was created as a result of the DLCS COS Resource Development Summit.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [TC2] (0-2) 2 :
2 ) Identify applications and operations of various technology systems.

Examples: applications—word processing, multimedia presentation software

-  operations—opening, closing, and saving files

•  Using accurate terminology related to technology
Example: "press," not "hit," keys

•  Using input devices to enter letters, numbers, and symbols
•  Using special functions of input devices
Example: keyboard shortcuts

•  Labeling storage media
•  Removing storage media safely
[TC2] (0-2) 3 :
3 ) Demonstrate correct posture and finger placement while using a technology system.

[TC2] (0-2) 8 :
8 ) Use digital environments to exchange ideas with individuals or groups.

Examples: other states, other countries

•  Producing digital works collaboratively
Examples: developing shared writing projects, creating language experience stories

[TC2] (3-5) 1 :
1 ) Use input and output devices of technology systems.

Examples: input—recording devices, keyboards, touchscreens

-  output—printers

•  Demonstrating ergonomics relative to technology systems
•  Demonstrating correct keyboarding techniques
•  Demonstrating safe removal of storage media
[TC2] (3-5) 2 :
2 ) Use various technology applications, including word processing and multimedia software.

•  Using navigational features commonly found in technology applications
•  Identifying digital file types
[TC2] (3-5) 8 :
8 ) Collect information from a variety of digital sources.

Examples: online libraries, multimedia dictionaries

•  Using technology tools to organize information
•  Demonstrating efficient Internet search strategies
Example: keyword search

•  Evaluating electronic resources for reliability based on publication date, bias, accuracy, and source credibility
[TC2] (3-5) 9 :
9 ) Use technology tools to organize, interpret, and display data.

Examples: spreadsheets, databases, electronic graphing tools

[TC2] (3-5) 12 :
12 ) Create a product using digital tools.

Examples: products—digital story, podcast, digital artwork

[TC2] (6-8) 7 :
7 ) Demonstrate correct keyboarding techniques.

[TC2] (6-8) 11 :
11 ) Use digital tools and strategies to locate, collect, organize, evaluate, and synthesize information.

Examples: locating—Boolean searches, graphic organizers, spreadsheets, databases

-  collecting—probeware, graphing calculators

-  organizing—graphic organizers, spreadsheets

-  evaluating—reviewing publication dates, determining credibility

-  synthesizing—word processing software, concept-mapping software

[DLIT] (2) 20 :
14) Collect, create, and organize data in a digital chart or graph.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[DLIT] (5) 27 :
21) Manipulate data to answer a question using a variety of computing methods and tools to collect, organize, graph, analyze, and publish the resulting information.

Subject: Technology Education (K - 8), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2 - 5)
Title: Comparing and Contrasting
Description:

The Venn diagram app allows students to compare and contrast any topic. The diagram can then be saved to the camera roll on the iPad as well as emailed as a PDF file.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (4) 3 :
3 ) Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions). [RL.4.3]

[ELA2015] (4) 9 :
9 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the Grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. [RL.4.10]

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Subject: English Language Arts (4), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4)
Title: ReadWriteThink Cube Creator
Description:

In this activity, students will use a cube creator to organize the key elements in a story. The Story Cube Creator interactive allows students to summarize the key elements in a story, including character, setting, conflict, resolution, and theme. This interactive tool is used to help the students organize the story in a fun and engaging way.




   View Standards     Standard(s): [TC2] (3-5) 2 :
2 ) Use various technology applications, including word processing and multimedia software.

•  Using navigational features commonly found in technology applications
•  Identifying digital file types
[TC2] (3-5) 9 :
9 ) Use technology tools to organize, interpret, and display data.

Examples: spreadsheets, databases, electronic graphing tools

[TC2] (6-8) 11 :
11 ) Use digital tools and strategies to locate, collect, organize, evaluate, and synthesize information.

Examples: locating—Boolean searches, graphic organizers, spreadsheets, databases

-  collecting—probeware, graphing calculators

-  organizing—graphic organizers, spreadsheets

-  evaluating—reviewing publication dates, determining credibility

-  synthesizing—word processing software, concept-mapping software

[ELA2015] (0) 3 :
3 ) With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. [RL.K.3]

[ELA2015] (0) 11 :
11 ) With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. [RI.K.2]

[ELA2015] (0) 28 :
28 ) With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. [W.K.6]

[ELA2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details. [RL.1.3]

[ELA2015] (1) 11 :
11 ) Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. [RI.1.2]

[ELA2015] (1) 28 :
28 ) With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. [W.1.6]

[ELA2015] (1) 35 :
35 ) Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. [SL.1.5]

[ELA2015] (2) 26 :
26 ) With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. [W.2.6]

[ELA2015] (2) 30 :
30 ) Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. [SL.2.2]

[ELA2015] (3) 5 :
5 ) Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. [RL.3.5]

[ELA2015] (3) 32 :
32 ) Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. [SL.3.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 16 :
16 ) Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. [RI.4.7]

[ELA2015] (5) 5 :
5 ) Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem. [RL.5.5]

[ELA2015] (5) 36 :
36 ) Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes. [SL.5.5]

[ELA2015] (6) 3 :
3 ) Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution. [RL.6.3]

[ELA2015] (6) 35 :
35 ) Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information. [SL.6.5]

[ELA2015] (7) 3 :
3 ) Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). [RL.7.3]

[ELA2015] (7) 34 :
34 ) Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points. [SL.7.5]

[ELA2015] (8) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.8.2]

[ELA2015] (8) 34 :
34 ) Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. [SL.8.5]

[ELA2015] (9) 3 :
3 ) Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. [RL.9-10.3]

[ELA2015] (9) 34 :
34 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.9-10.5]

[ELA2015] (10) 3 :
3 ) Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. [RL.9-10.3]

[ELA2015] (10) 35 :
35 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.9-10.5]

[ELA2015] (11) 3 :
3 ) Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). [RL.11-12.3]

[ELA2015] (11) 33 :
33 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.11-12.5]

[ELA2015] (12) 3 :
3 ) Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). [RL.11-12.3]

[ELA2015] (12) 33 :
33 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.11-12.5]

[DLIT] (2) 20 :
14) Collect, create, and organize data in a digital chart or graph.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[DLIT] (5) 23 :
17) Publish organized information in different ways to make it more useful or relevant.

Examples: Infographic, student created website.

[DLIT] (6) 7 :
1) Remove background details from an everyday process to highlight essential properties.

Examples: When making a sandwich, the type of bread, condiments, meats, and/or vegetables do not affect the fact that one is making a sandwich.

Subject: Technology Education (3 - 8), English Language Arts (K - 12), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2 - 6)
Title: Interactive Plot Diagram
Description:

This organizational tool for grades K-12 uses the plot diagram pyramid to map events in a story.  You can choose beginning, middle, and end for younger learners or exposition, climax, and resolution for older learners.  The mapping tool allows readers to recreate a story you have taught in class, or writers to map out the ideas for an original piece. 




ALEX Learning Activities: 5

Go To Top of page
ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 26 :
20) Compare and contrast human and computer performance on similar tasks to understand which is better suited to the task.

Examples: Sorting alphabetically, finding a path across a cluttered room.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm that is defined by simple pseudocode.

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (7) 9 :
3) Create algorithms that demonstrate sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Debit card transactions are approved until the account balance is insufficient to fund the transaction = iteration, do until.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 7)
Title: Sorting Algorithms
URL: https://classic.csunplugged.org/sorting-algorithms/
Description:

Computers are often used to put lists into some sort of order, for example, names into alphabetical order, appointments or e-mail by date, or items in numerical order. Sorting lists helps us find things quickly, and also makes extreme values easy to see. If you sort the marks for a class test into numeric order, the lowest and highest marks become obvious.

If you use the wrong method, it can take a long time to sort a large list into order, even on a fast computer. Fortunately, several fast methods are known for sorting. In this activity, children will discover different methods for sorting and see how a clever method can perform the task much more quickly than a simple one.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

[DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[DLIT] (4) 25 :
19) Use data from a simulation to answer a question collaboratively.

[DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

[DLIT] (5) 14 :
8) Demonstrate that programs require known starting values that may need to be updated appropriately during the execution of programs.

Examples: Set initial value of a variable, updating variables.

[DLIT] (5) 27 :
21) Manipulate data to answer a question using a variety of computing methods and tools to collect, organize, graph, analyze, and publish the resulting information.

[DLIT] (5) 32 :
26) Connect data from a simulation to real-life events.

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 14 :
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

[DLIT] (7) 12 :
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

[DLIT] (7) 13 :
7) Create a program that updates the value of a variable in the program.

Examples: Update the value of score when a coin is collected (in a flowchart, pseudocode or program).

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 7)
Title: Sports
URL: https://csfirst.withgoogle.com/c/cs-first/en/sports/overview.html
Description:

Students use computer science to simulate extreme sports, make their own fitness gadget commercial, and create commentary for a big sporting event.

Sports is a complete theme designed to be completed over eight, 45-75 minute, sessions. For each activity, students will watch a series of videos and create one coding project with opportunities to personalize their work using “Add-Ons,” which are mini-coding challenges that build on top of the core project.

Be sure to review the Materials tab for the lesson plan, starter guide, and more.

Users will need a Google account to use this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

[DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[DLIT] (4) 25 :
19) Use data from a simulation to answer a question collaboratively.

[DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

[DLIT] (5) 14 :
8) Demonstrate that programs require known starting values that may need to be updated appropriately during the execution of programs.

Examples: Set initial value of a variable, updating variables.

[DLIT] (5) 27 :
21) Manipulate data to answer a question using a variety of computing methods and tools to collect, organize, graph, analyze, and publish the resulting information.

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 14 :
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

[DLIT] (7) 12 :
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

[DLIT] (7) 13 :
7) Create a program that updates the value of a variable in the program.

Examples: Update the value of score when a coin is collected (in a flowchart, pseudocode or program).

[DLIT] (8) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

[DLIT] (8) 13 :
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 8)
Title: Music & Sound
URL: https://csfirst.withgoogle.com/c/cs-first/en/music-and-sound/overview.html
Description:

In Music & Sound, students use the computer to play musical notes, create a music video, and build an interactive music display while learning how programming is used to create music.

Music is a complete theme designed to be completed over eight, 45-75 minute, sessions. For each activity, students will watch a series of videos and create one coding project with opportunities to personalize their work using “Add-Ons,” which are mini-coding challenges that build on top of the core project.

Be sure to review the Materials tab for the lesson plan, starter guide, and more.

Users will need a Google account to use this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 26 :
20) Compare and contrast human and computer performance on similar tasks to understand which is better suited to the task.

Examples: Sorting alphabetically, finding a path across a cluttered room.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[DLIT] (7) 7 :
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

[DLIT] (7) 9 :
3) Create algorithms that demonstrate sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Debit card transactions are approved until the account balance is insufficient to fund the transaction = iteration, do until.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 7)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 1 Chapter 2 Lesson 6: Processing
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd1-2018/stage/6/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson dives deeper into the concept of processing that was introduced as part of the definition of a computer. Pairs work together to put a deck of cards in order, a form of processing information. In the end, the class discusses what processing means within the context of solving information problems.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 4

Go To Top of page