ALEX Resources

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Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (19)


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (5) 32 :
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 5 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.5.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.5.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.5.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. [SL.5.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from the discussions. [SL.5.1d]

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

[CE] (0-12) 22 :
22 ) Creativity

[CE] (0-12) 12 :
12 ) Compassion

[CE] (0-12) 6 :
6 ) Respect for others

[CG1] (0-12) 100 :
100 ) PS:B1.3 - identify alternative solutions to a problem

Subject: English Language Arts (5), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5), Character Education (K - 12), Counseling and Guidance (K - 12)
Title: C.A.R.E. to Solve a Real-World Problem and Develop Empathy!
Description:

This experience was designed to support its title, the acronym C.A.R.E., which stands for Come together, Assess a need, Relate to a need, Empathize!

 

This interactive, Google Doc will guide students through the problem-solving process as they practice active listening and creativity during the interview (empathy) and design (iteration) stages of Design Thinking to solve a problem being experienced by a peer.

 

This experience will provide students with the opportunity to practice the use of the 4 C's (communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity), which are highly demanded, 21st Century skills in the career world.

 

The student(s) can use the interactive guide to document information gathered during a personal interview with a peer, analyze that information and generate a problem statement prior to listing ideas and designing a prototype as a potential solution. 

 

The active engagement in this experience will expose the student(s) to the Alabama Course of Study standards that focus on identifying alternative solutions to problems, designing prototypes, collaborative communication, showing compassion and respect for others, and expressing creativity.

This activity is a result of the ALEX Resource Development Summit.




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 11 :
5) Use flowcharts to create a plan or algorithm.

[DLIT] (4) 27 :
21) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a simple problem.

[DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm that is defined by simple pseudocode.

[DLIT] (5) 11 :
5) Develop and recommend solutions to a given problem and explain the process to an audience.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 36 :
30) Apply the problem-solving process to solve real-world problems.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4 - 7)
Title: Minimal Spanning Trees
URL: https://classic.csunplugged.org/minimal-spanning-trees/
Description:

Networks are everywhere in modern society: roads, wires, water and gas pipes all connect one place to another. Computers are built of networks at many levels, from the microscopic connections between transistors in a chip to the cables and satellites that link the internet around the world. People who build networks often need to work out the most efficient way to make connections, which can be a difficult problem.

This puzzle shows students the decisions involved in linking a network between houses in a muddy city. It can lead to a discussion of minimal spanning tree algorithms for optimizing networks.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (4) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (4) 8 :
2) Formulate a list of sub-problems to consider while addressing a larger problem.

Examples: Problem - a multi-step math problem; sub-problem - steps to solve.
Problem - light bulb does not light; sub-problem - steps to resolve why.

[DLIT] (4) 10 :
4) Detect and debug logical errors in various basic algorithms.

Example: Trace the path of a set of directions to determine success or failure.

[DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

[DLIT] (4) 27 :
21) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a simple problem.

[DLIT] (5) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

[DLIT] (5) 14 :
8) Demonstrate that programs require known starting values that may need to be updated appropriately during the execution of programs.

Examples: Set initial value of a variable, updating variables.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

[DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 14 :
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

[DLIT] (7) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 13 :
7) Create a program that updates the value of a variable in the program.

Examples: Update the value of score when a coin is collected (in a flowchart, pseudocode or program).

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (8) 7 :
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

[DLIT] (8) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

[DLIT] (8) 13 :
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

[DLIT] (8) 35 :
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (4 - 8)
Title: Game Design
URL: https://csfirst.withgoogle.com/c/cs-first/en/game-design/overview.html
Description:

In Game Design, students learn basic video game coding concepts by making different types of games, including racing, platform, launching, and more! 

Game Design is a complete theme designed to be completed over eight, 45-75 minute, sessions. For each activity, students will watch a series of videos and create one coding project with opportunities to personalize their work using “Add-Ons”, which are mini-coding challenges that build on top of the core project.

Be sure to review the Materials tab for the lesson plan, starter guide, and more.

Users will need a Google account to use this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 10 :
4) Create a simple pseudocode.

[DLIT] (5) 11 :
5) Develop and recommend solutions to a given problem and explain the process to an audience.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 1: My Robotic Friends (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/1/
Description:

Using a predefined symbol key, your students will guide one another to accomplish specific tasks without using any verbal commands. This segment teaches students the connection between symbols and actions, the difference between an algorithm and a program, and the valuable skill of debugging.

This unplugged lesson brings the class together as a team with a simple task to complete: get a "robot" to stack cups in a specific design. Students will work to recognize real-world actions as potential instructions in code. The designing of precise instructions will also be practiced, as students work to translate worded instructions into the symbols provided. If problems arise in the code, students should work together to recognize bugs and build solutions.

Students will be able to:
- gain an understanding of the need for precision in coding.
- learn how to recognize a bug and how to debug the malfunctioning code.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 11 :
5) Develop and recommend solutions to a given problem and explain the process to an audience.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 3: Building a Foundation (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/3/
Description:

New and unsolved problems are often pretty hard. If we want to have any chance of making something creative, useful, and clever, then we need to be willing to attack hard problems even if it means failing a few times before we succeed. In this lesson, students will be building a structure with common materials. The structure will be tested on its ability to hold a textbook for more than ten seconds. Most students will not get this right the first time, but it's important they push through and keep trying.

This lesson teaches that failure is not the end of a journey, but a hint for how to succeed. The majority of students will feel frustrated at some point in this lesson, but it's important to emphasize that failure and frustration are common steps to creativity and success.

Students will be able to:
- outline steps to complete a structural engineering challenge.
- predict and discuss potential issues in structure creation.
- build a structure based on a team plan.
- revise both the plan and the structure until they satisfy the challenge.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 4: Debugging With Scrat (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/4/
Description:

Debugging is an essential element of learning to program. In this lesson, students will encounter puzzles that have been solved incorrectly. They will need to step through the existing code to identify errors, including incorrect loops, missing blocks, extra blocks, and blocks that are out of order.

Students in your class might become frustrated with this lesson because of the essence of debugging. Debugging is a concept that is very important to computer programming. Computer scientists have to get really good at facing the bugs in their own programs. Debugging forces the students to recognize problems and overcome them while building critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Students will be able to:
- predict where a program will fail.
- modify an existing program to solve errors.
- reflect on the debugging process in an age-appropriate way.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 7 :
1) Construct a complex system of numbers or letters to represent information.

Example: Student-created complex secret codes using more than one form to solve a problem or answer a question.

[DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 14 :
8) Demonstrate that programs require known starting values that may need to be updated appropriately during the execution of programs.

Examples: Set initial value of a variable, updating variables.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 5: Creating Art With Code (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/5/
Description:

In this lesson, students will take control of the Artist to complete drawings on the screen. This Artist stage will allow students to create images of increasing complexity using new blocks like move forward by 100 pixels and turn right by 90 degrees.

Building off of the students' previous experience with sequencing, this lesson will work to inspire more creativity with coding. The purpose of this lesson is to solidify knowledge of sequencing by introducing new blocks and goals. In this case, students learn more about pixels and angles using the new blocks, while still practicing their sequencing skills. Also, students will be able to visualize new goals such as coding the Artist to draw a square.

Students will be able to:
- create a program to complete an image using sequential steps.
- break complex shapes into simple parts.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 7 :
1) Construct a complex system of numbers or letters to represent information.

Example: Student-created complex secret codes using more than one form to solve a problem or answer a question.

[DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 11 :
5) Develop and recommend solutions to a given problem and explain the process to an audience.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 6: My Loopy Robotic Friends (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/6/
Description:

Building on the initial "My Robotic Friends" activity, students learn to use loops when programming their robots in order to build bigger structures more efficiently.

This lesson serves as a reintroduction to loops, using the now-familiar set of "robot" programming instructions. Students will develop critical thinking skills by looking for patterns of repetition in the movements of classmates and determining how to simplify those repeated patterns using loops.

Students will be able to:
- identify repeated patterns in code that could be replaced with a loop.
- write instructions that use loops to repeat patterns.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 7: Drawing Shapes With Loops (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/7/
Description:

Watch student faces light up as they make their own gorgeous designs using a small number of blocks and digital stickers! This lesson builds on the understanding of loops from previous lessons and gives students a chance to be truly creative. This activity is fantastic for producing artifacts for portfolios or parent/teacher conferences.

This series highlights the power of loops with creative and personal designs. Offered as a project-backed sequence, this progression will allow students to build on top of their own work and create amazing artifacts.

Students will be able to:
- identify the benefits of using a loop structure instead of manual repetition.
- differentiate between commands that need to be repeated in loops and commands that should be used on their own.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 8: Nested Loops in Maze (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/8/
Description:

In this online activity, students will have the opportunity to push their understanding of loops to a whole new level. Playing with the Bee and Plants vs. Zombies, students will learn how to program a loop to be inside of another loop. They will also be encouraged to figure out how little changes in either loop will affect their program when they click Run.

In this introduction to nested loops, students will go outside of their comfort zone to create more efficient solutions to puzzles. In earlier puzzles, loops pushed students to recognize repetition. Here, students will learn to recognize patterns within repeated patterns to develop these nested loops. This stage starts off by encouraging students to try to solve a puzzle where the code is irritating and complex to write out the long way. After a video introduces nested loops, students are shown an example and asked to predict what will happen when a loop is put inside of another loop. This progression leads to plenty of practice for students to solidify and build on their understanding of looping in programming.

Students will be able to:
- break complex tasks into smaller repeatable sections.
- recognize large repeated patterns as made from smaller repeated patterns.
- identify the benefits of using a loop structure instead of manual repetition.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 9: Nested Loops With Frozen (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/9/
Description:

Now that students know how to layer their loops, they can create so many beautiful things. This lesson will take students through a series of exercises to help them create their own portfolio-ready images using Anna and Elsa's excellent ice-skating skills!

In this series, students will get practice nesting loops while creating images that they will be excited to share. Beginning with a handful of instructions, students will make their own decisions when it comes to creating designs for repetition. They will then spin those around a variety of ways to end up with a work of art that is truly unique.

Students will be able to:
- describe when a loop, nested loop, or no loop is needed.
- recognize the difference between using a loop and a nested loop.
- break apart code into the largest repeatable sequences using both loops and nested loops.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 21: Learning Sprite Lab (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/21/
Description:

In this lesson, students will learn about the two concepts at the heart of Sprite Lab: sprites and behaviors. Sprites are characters or objects on the screen that students can move, change, and manipulate. Behaviors are actions that sprites will take continuously until they are stopped.

his lesson is designed to introduce students to the core vocabulary of Sprite Lab, and allow them to apply concepts they learned in other environments to this tool. By creating a fish tank, students will begin to form an understanding of the programming model of this tool and explore ways they can use it to express themselves.

Students will be able to:
- define “sprite” as a character or object on the screen that can be moved and changed.
- create a new sprite and choose its appearance.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 22: Alien Dance Party (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/22/
Description:

This lesson features Sprite Lab, a platform where students can create their own alien dance party with interactions between characters and user input. Students will work with events to create game controls.

Students will use events to make characters move around the screen, make noises, and change backgrounds based on user input. This lesson offers a great introduction to events in programming and even gives a chance to show creativity! At the end of the puzzle sequence, students will be presented with the opportunity to share their projects.

Students will be able to:
- identify actions that correlate to input events.
- create an animated, interactive game using sequence and events.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 23: Pet Giraffe (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/23/
Description:

Here, students will use Sprite Lab to play with sprites and their properties. Students will use events, behaviors, and custom code to create their very own pet giraffe that gets hungry, playful, and even filthy!

Students will use events to make characters move around the screen, change size, and change colors based on user input. This lesson offers a great introduction to events in programming and even gives a chance to show creativity!

Students will be able to:
- identify actions that correlate to input events.
- create an animated, interactive game using sequence and events.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 24: Explore Project Ideas (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/24/
Description:

The next five lessons provide an opportunity for students to put their coding skills to use in a capstone project. This project will help individuals gain experience with coding and produce an exemplar to share with peers and loved ones. This is intended to be a multi-lesson or multi-week project where students spend time brainstorming, learning about the design process, building, and presenting their final work.

In the "Explore" stage, students will play around with pre-built Artist and Sprite Lab programs for inspiration. Next, students will learn about the design process and how to implement it in their own projects. They will be given the space to create their own project in Artist, Sprite Lab, or any other interface that you are comfortable providing. (This is likely the longest stage of the project.) Students will then revise their code after testing and peer review. Finally, students will present their finished work to their classmates.

Exploring Project Ideas is meant to inspire students with realistic and entertaining ideas for their culminating projects.

Students will be able to:
- learn to plan in advance for an ongoing assignment.
- explain how system limitations can affect project design.
- describe how compromise can help keep a project on track and inspire creativity.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 25: The Design Process (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/25/
Description:

Over the course of five lessons, students will be building a project of their own design using either Sprite Lab or Artist as their programming environment. In this portion of the project, students will learn about the design process and how to implement it in their own projects. The lesson guide provides an overview of all five stages of the process can be found at the beginning of the project process, here.

Students may be ready to jump straight into building their projects, but this lesson will help shape their ideas into plans. This structure will keep the dreamers grounded and illuminate a path for those feeling left in the dark.

Students will be able to:
- shape ideas into reasonable goals and plans.
- recognize any potential obstacles such as time constraints or bugs.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 26: Build Your Project (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/26/
Description:

Over the course of five lessons, students will be building a project of their own design using either Sprite Lab or Artist as their programming environment. Now the students will be given their own space to create their project with either Artist or Sprite Lab. This will be the longest portion of the project. The lesson guide provides an overview of all five stages of the process can be found in the beginning of the project process, here.

This lesson provides students with ample time to build and revise their projects. The trial and error inevitably involved in this lesson will teach problem solving and persistence.

Students will be able to:
- use the planned design as a blueprint for creation.
- overcome obstacles such as time constraints or bugs.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 27: Revise Your Project (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/27/
Description:

Over the course of five lessons, students will be building a project of their own design using either Sprite Lab or Artist as their programming environment. Now that the projects are built, students are given the opportunity to get feedback from peers and revise their projects. The lesson guide provides an overview of all five stages of the process can be found in the beginning of the project process, here.

This lesson helps students take a step back and view their project from a new perspective. Here, students will be able to decide if they have reached their goals. If they haven't, this lesson gives them time and space to complete the project.

Students will be able to:
- determine if the criteria set in a rubric has been met with their current project.
- draft and implement plans to resolve any issues in their code.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (5) 11 :
5) Develop and recommend solutions to a given problem and explain the process to an audience.

[DLIT] (5) 34 :
28) Develop, test, and refine prototypes as part of a cyclical design process to solve a complex problem.

Examples: Design backpack for a specific user's needs; design a method to collect and transport water without the benefit of faucets; design boats that need to hold as much payload as possible before sinking; design models of chairs based on specific user needs.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5)
Title: Computer Science Fundamentals Unit 7 Course F Lesson 28: Present Your Project (2018)
URL: https://curriculum.code.org/csf-18/coursef/28/
Description:

Over the course of five lessons, students will be building a project of their own design using either Sprite Lab or Artist as their programming environment. Now that the projects are built, students are given the opportunity to get feedback from peers and revise their projects. The lesson guide provides an overview of all five stages of the process can be found in the beginning of the project process, here.

At this point, students have worked very hard on their projects, so this lesson is meant to offer a space for the students to share their projects. This lesson will build a supportive community where students will build their own confidence and feel connected to their hardworking peers.

Students will be able to:
- indicate where each criterion point from the rubric is satisfied in the code for the finished culminating project.
- articulate the design process and how it helped shape the finished culminating project.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 18

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