ALEX Resources

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Learning Activities (1) Building blocks of a lesson plan that include before, during, and after strategies to actively engage students in learning a concept or skill. Classroom Resources (4)


ALEX Learning Activities  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [ELA2015] (0) 3 :
3 ) With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. [RL.K.3]

[ELA2015] (0) 11 :
11 ) With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. [RI.K.2]

[ELA2015] (0) 28 :
28 ) With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. [W.K.6]

[ELA2015] (1) 3 :
3 ) Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details. [RL.1.3]

[ELA2015] (1) 11 :
11 ) Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text. [RI.1.2]

[ELA2015] (1) 28 :
28 ) With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. [W.1.6]

[ELA2015] (1) 35 :
35 ) Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. [SL.1.5]

[ELA2015] (2) 26 :
26 ) With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. [W.2.6]

[ELA2015] (2) 30 :
30 ) Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. [SL.2.2]

[ELA2015] (3) 5 :
5 ) Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. [RL.3.5]

[ELA2015] (3) 32 :
32 ) Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. [SL.3.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]

[ELA2015] (4) 16 :
16 ) Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. [RI.4.7]

[ELA2015] (5) 5 :
5 ) Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem. [RL.5.5]

[ELA2015] (5) 36 :
36 ) Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes. [SL.5.5]

[ELA2015] (6) 3 :
3 ) Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves toward a resolution. [RL.6.3]

[ELA2015] (6) 35 :
35 ) Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and visual displays in presentations to clarify information. [SL.6.5]

[ELA2015] (7) 3 :
3 ) Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). [RL.7.3]

[ELA2015] (7) 34 :
34 ) Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points. [SL.7.5]

[ELA2015] (8) 2 :
2 ) Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text. [RL.8.2]

[ELA2015] (8) 34 :
34 ) Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest. [SL.8.5]

[ELA2015] (9) 3 :
3 ) Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. [RL.9-10.3]

[ELA2015] (9) 34 :
34 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.9-10.5]

[ELA2015] (10) 3 :
3 ) Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. [RL.9-10.3]

[ELA2015] (10) 35 :
35 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.9-10.5]

[ELA2015] (11) 3 :
3 ) Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). [RL.11-12.3]

[ELA2015] (11) 33 :
33 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.11-12.5]

[ELA2015] (12) 3 :
3 ) Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). [RL.11-12.3]

[ELA2015] (12) 33 :
33 ) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. [SL.11-12.5]

[DLIT] (2) 20 :
14) Collect, create, and organize data in a digital chart or graph.

[DLIT] (4) 18 :
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[DLIT] (5) 23 :
17) Publish organized information in different ways to make it more useful or relevant.

Examples: Infographic, student created website.

[DLIT] (6) 7 :
1) Remove background details from an everyday process to highlight essential properties.

Examples: When making a sandwich, the type of bread, condiments, meats, and/or vegetables do not affect the fact that one is making a sandwich.

Subject: English Language Arts (K - 12), Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2 - 6)
Title: Interactive Plot Diagram
Description:

This organizational tool for grades K-12 uses the plot diagram pyramid to map events in a story.  You can choose beginning, middle, and end for younger learners or exposition, climax, and resolution for older learners.  The mapping tool allows readers to recreate a story you have taught in class, or writers to map out the ideas for an original piece. 




ALEX Learning Activities: 1

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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 7 :
1) Remove background details from an everyday process to highlight essential properties.

Examples: When making a sandwich, the type of bread, condiments, meats, and/or vegetables do not affect the fact that one is making a sandwich.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 13 :
7) Describe how automation works to increase efficiency.

Example: Compare the amount of time/work to hand wash a car vs. using an automated car wash.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 12 :
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (7) 36 :
30) Apply the problem-solving process to solve real-world problems.

[DLIT] (8) 8 :
2) Explain how abstraction is used in a given function.

Example: Examine a set of block-based code and explain how abstraction was used.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

[DLIT] (8) 12 :
6) Describe how algorithmic processes and automation increase efficiency.

[DLIT] (8) 35 :
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computational Thinking
URL: https://www.remc.org/21Things4Students/21/21-computational-thinking/
Description:

Have you ever had a complex problem that you needed to solve? This could be a math problem, science experiment, an essay you need to write, and coding and game design. It could even be as simple as planning the best route to school or baking your favorite cookies!

Computational thinking can be used to take a complex problem, understand what the problem is and develop possible solutions to solve or explain it.

Students will complete Quests to learn about the four stages of computational thinking:


LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

When you have completed this activity you will:

  1. understand computational thinking [Computational Thinker]
     
  2. be able to solve complex problems using computational thinking. [Computational Thinker]

  3. be able to break down a problem into smaller more manageable parts. [Computational Thinker]

  4. know how to look for patterns and sequences. [Computational Thinker]

  5. be able to focus on important information only. [Computational Thinker]

  6. be able to develop a step-by-step solution to the problem. [Computational Thinker]

  7. know how to use coding to automate a task [Computational Thinker]

  8. understand computational design by applying technology to a problem [Innovative Designer]

  9. understand programming as you complete hands-on activities, solving problems encountered [Computational Thinker]

  10. understand the coding your program creates [Empowered Learner]



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

[DLIT] (5) 14 :
8) Demonstrate that programs require known starting values that may need to be updated appropriately during the execution of programs.

Examples: Set initial value of a variable, updating variables.

[DLIT] (6) 7 :
1) Remove background details from an everyday process to highlight essential properties.

Examples: When making a sandwich, the type of bread, condiments, meats, and/or vegetables do not affect the fact that one is making a sandwich.

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 14 :
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

[DLIT] (7) 8 :
2) Create complex pseudocode using conditionals and Boolean statements.

Example: Automated vacuum pseudocode — drive forward until the unit encounters an obstacle; reverse 2"; rotate 30 degrees to the left, repeat.

[DLIT] (7) 13 :
7) Create a program that updates the value of a variable in the program.

Examples: Update the value of score when a coin is collected (in a flowchart, pseudocode or program).

[DLIT] (8) 13 :
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (5 - 8)
Title: Create Your Own Google Logo
URL: https://csfirst.withgoogle.com/c/cs-first/en/create-your-own-google-logo/overview.html
Description:

In each of the “Create your own Google logo” activities, students code and design their own versions of the Google logo. These activities introduce students to computer science and the programming language Scratch. These activities are most appropriate for students ages 9-14 and take 15-60 minutes to run.

Be sure to review the Materials tab for the lesson plan, starter guide, and more. 

Users will need a Google account to use this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

[DLIT] (4) 10 :
4) Detect and debug logical errors in various basic algorithms.

Example: Trace the path of a set of directions to determine success or failure.

[DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 7 :
1) Remove background details from an everyday process to highlight essential properties.

Examples: When making a sandwich, the type of bread, condiments, meats, and/or vegetables do not affect the fact that one is making a sandwich.

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 14 :
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 6)
Title: Storytelling
URL: https://csfirst.withgoogle.com/c/cs-first/en/storytelling/overview.html
Description:

In Storytelling, students use computer science to tell fun and interactive stories. Storytelling emphasizes creativity by encouraging students to tell a unique story each day.

Storytelling is a complete theme designed to be completed over eight, 45-75 minute sessions. For each Activity, students will watch a series of videos and create one coding project with opportunities to personalize their work using “Add-Ons”, which are mini-coding challenges that build on top of the core project.

This Unit Plan consists of eight activities to be completed over multiple days or weeks. 

Be sure to review the Materials tab for the lesson plan, starter guide, and more. 

Users will need a Google account to use this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 8 :
2) Analyze a given list of sub-problems while addressing a larger problem.

Example: Problem - making a peanut butter sandwich; sub-problem - opening jar, finding a knife, getting the bread.
Problem - design and share a brochure; sub-problem - selecting font, choosing layout.

[DLIT] (3) 13 :
7) Test and debug a given program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

Examples: Sequencing cards for unplugged activities, online coding practice.

[DLIT] (4) 8 :
2) Formulate a list of sub-problems to consider while addressing a larger problem.

Examples: Problem - a multi-step math problem; sub-problem - steps to solve.
Problem - light bulb does not light; sub-problem - steps to resolve why.

[DLIT] (4) 9 :
3) Show that different solutions exist for the same problem or sub-problem.

[DLIT] (4) 10 :
4) Detect and debug logical errors in various basic algorithms.

Example: Trace the path of a set of directions to determine success or failure.

[DLIT] (4) 13 :
7) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs, in collaboration with others.

[DLIT] (5) 8 :
2) Create an algorithm to solve a problem while detecting and debugging logical errors within the algorithm.

Examples: Program the movement of a character, robot, or person through a maze.
Define a variable that can be changed or updated.

[DLIT] (5) 12 :
6) Create a working program in a block-based visual programming environment using arithmetic operators, conditionals, and repetition in programs.

[DLIT] (5) 14 :
8) Demonstrate that programs require known starting values that may need to be updated appropriately during the execution of programs.

Examples: Set initial value of a variable, updating variables.

[DLIT] (6) 7 :
1) Remove background details from an everyday process to highlight essential properties.

Examples: When making a sandwich, the type of bread, condiments, meats, and/or vegetables do not affect the fact that one is making a sandwich.

[DLIT] (6) 14 :
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

[DLIT] (7) 12 :
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

[DLIT] (7) 13 :
7) Create a program that updates the value of a variable in the program.

Examples: Update the value of score when a coin is collected (in a flowchart, pseudocode or program).

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (8) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

[DLIT] (8) 13 :
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

[DLIT] (8) 29 :
23) Design a digital artifact to propose a solution for a content-related problem.

Example: Create a presentation outlining how to create a cost-efficient method to melt snow on roads during the winter.

[DLIT] (8) 35 :
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 8)
Title: Art
URL: https://csfirst.withgoogle.com/c/cs-first/en/art/overview.html
Description:

In Art, students create animations, interactive artwork, photograph filters, and other exciting, artistic projects.

Art is a complete theme designed to be completed over eight, 45-75 minute, sessions. For each Activity, students will watch a series of videos and create one coding project with opportunities to personalize their work using “Add-Ons”, which are mini-coding challenges that build on top of the core project.

Be sure to review the Materials tab for the lesson plan, starter guide, and more.

Users will need a Google account to use this resource.  



ALEX Classroom Resources: 4

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