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Classroom Resources (7)


ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 14 :
8) Create a program that initializes a variable.

Example: Create a flowchart in which the variable or object returns to a starting position upon completion of a task.

[DLIT] (6) 29 :
23) Discuss how digital devices may be used to collect, analyze, and present information.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (7) 7 :
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

[DLIT] (7) 8 :
2) Create complex pseudocode using conditionals and Boolean statements.

Example: Automated vacuum pseudocode — drive forward until the unit encounters an obstacle; reverse 2"; rotate 30 degrees to the left, repeat.

[DLIT] (7) 9 :
3) Create algorithms that demonstrate sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Debit card transactions are approved until the account balance is insufficient to fund the transaction = iteration, do until.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 12 :
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

[DLIT] (7) 13 :
7) Create a program that updates the value of a variable in the program.

Examples: Update the value of score when a coin is collected (in a flowchart, pseudocode or program).

[DLIT] (7) 22 :
16) Construct content designed for specific audiences through an appropriate medium.

Examples: Design a multi-media children's e-book with an appropriate readability level.

[DLIT] (7) 23 :
17) Publish content to be available for external feedback.

[DLIT] (7) 33 :
27) Identify data needed to create a model or simulation of a given event.

Examples: When creating a random name generator, the program needs access to a list of possible names.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (8) 7 :
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

[DLIT] (8) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

[DLIT] (8) 10 :
4) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: 38 = 3*3*3*3*3*3*3*3; =(Average) used in a spreadsheet to average a given list of grades.

[DLIT] (8) 13 :
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

[DLIT] (8) 35 :
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 6 Chapter 1 Lesson 9: Make a Game (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd6-2018/stage/9/puzzle/1
Description:

Students take what they've learned through Unit 6 Chapter 1 and develop an app of their own design that uses the circuit board to output information.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource. 



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 8 :
2) Define a process as a function.

Example: Functions or sets of steps combined to produce a process: turning off your alarm + getting out of bed + brushing your teeth + getting dressed = morning routine.

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (7) 7 :
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

[DLIT] (7) 10 :
4) Design a complex algorithm that contains sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Lunch line algorithm that contains parameters for bringing your lunch and multiple options available in the lunch line.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (8) 7 :
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 2 Lesson 20: The Game Design Process (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/20/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson introduces the process the class will use to design games for the remainder of the unit. The class walks through this process in a series of levels. As part of this lesson the class also briefly learns to use multi-frame animations in the Game Lab. At the end of the lesson, they have an opportunity to make improvements to the game to make it their own.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 8 :
2) Define a process as a function.

Example: Functions or sets of steps combined to produce a process: turning off your alarm + getting out of bed + brushing your teeth + getting dressed = morning routine.

[DLIT] (6) 11 :
5) Identify algorithms that make use of sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Sequencing is doing steps in order (put on socks, put on shoes, tie laces); selection uses a Boolean condition to determine which of two parts of an algorithm are used (hair is dirty? True, wash hair; false, do not); iteration is the repetition of part of an algorithm until a condition is met (if you're happy and you know it clap your hands, when you're no longer happy you stop clapping).

[DLIT] (6) 27 :
21) Identify varying data structures/systems and methods of classification, including decimal and binary.

Examples: Difference between a bit and a byte, bit representation, pixels.

[DLIT] (7) 7 :
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

[DLIT] (7) 10 :
4) Design a complex algorithm that contains sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Lunch line algorithm that contains parameters for bringing your lunch and multiple options available in the lunch line.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (8) 7 :
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

[DLIT] (8) 13 :
7) Create a program that includes selection, iteration, or abstraction, and initializes, and updates, at least two variables.

Examples: Make a game, interactive card, story, or adventure game.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 2 Lesson 19: Functions (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/19/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson covers functions as a way to organize code, make it more readable, and remove repeated blocks of code. The class learns that higher level or more abstract steps make it easier to understand and reason about steps, then begins to create functions in Game Lab. At the end of the lesson, the class uses these skills to organize and add functionality to the final version of their side scroller game.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (3) 26 :
20) Compare and contrast human and computer performance on similar tasks to understand which is better suited to the task.

Examples: Sorting alphabetically, finding a path across a cluttered room.

[DLIT] (4) 22 :
16) Gather and organize data to answer a question using a variety of computing and data visualization methods.

Examples: Sorting, totaling, averaging, charts, and graphs.

[DLIT] (7) 7 :
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

[DLIT] (7) 9 :
3) Create algorithms that demonstrate sequencing, selection or iteration.

Examples: Debit card transactions are approved until the account balance is insufficient to fund the transaction = iteration, do until.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (3 - 7)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 1 Chapter 2 Lesson 6: Processing
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd1-2018/stage/6/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson dives deeper into the concept of processing that was introduced as part of the definition of a computer. Pairs work together to put a deck of cards in order, a form of processing information. In the end, the class discusses what processing means within the context of solving information problems.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 8 :
2) Define a process as a function.

Example: Functions or sets of steps combined to produce a process: turning off your alarm + getting out of bed + brushing your teeth + getting dressed = morning routine.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 7 :
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 2: Plotting Shapes (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/2/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson explores the challenges of communicating how to draw with shapes and uses a tool that introduces how this problem is approached in the Game Lab. The class uses a Game Lab tool to interactively place shapes on Game Lab's 400 by 400 grid. Partners then take turns instructing each other how to draw a hidden image using this tool, accounting for many of the challenges of programming in Game Lab.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 8 :
2) Define a process as a function.

Example: Functions or sets of steps combined to produce a process: turning off your alarm + getting out of bed + brushing your teeth + getting dressed = morning routine.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 7 :
1) Create a function to simplify a task.

Example: Get a writing utensil, get paper, jot notes can collectively be named "note taking".

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (8) 7 :
1) Design a function using a programming language that demonstrates abstraction.

Example: Create a program that utilizes functions in an effort remove repetitive sequences of steps.

[DLIT] (8) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 3: Drawing in Game Lab (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/3/puzzle/1
Description:

The class is introduced to the Game Lab, the programming environment for this unit, and begins to use it to position shapes on the screen. The lesson covers the basics of sequencing and debugging, as well as a few simple commands. At the end of the lesson, the class creates an online version of the image they designed in the previous lesson.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 6

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