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ALEX Classroom Resources  
   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 7 :
1) Remove background details from an everyday process to highlight essential properties.

Examples: When making a sandwich, the type of bread, condiments, meats, and/or vegetables do not affect the fact that one is making a sandwich.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (6) 13 :
7) Describe how automation works to increase efficiency.

Example: Compare the amount of time/work to hand wash a car vs. using an automated car wash.

[DLIT] (6) 36 :
30) Discuss and apply the components of the problem-solving process.

Example: Students will devise a plan to alleviate traffic congestion around the school during drop-off and pick-up.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 12 :
6) Create and organize algorithms in order to automate a process efficiently.

Example: Set of recipes (algorithms) for preparing a complete meal.

[DLIT] (7) 14 :
8) Formulate a narrative for each step of a process and its intended result, given pseudocode or code.

[DLIT] (7) 36 :
30) Apply the problem-solving process to solve real-world problems.

[DLIT] (8) 8 :
2) Explain how abstraction is used in a given function.

Example: Examine a set of block-based code and explain how abstraction was used.

[DLIT] (8) 11 :
5) Discuss the efficiency of an algorithm or technology used to solve complex problems.

[DLIT] (8) 12 :
6) Describe how algorithmic processes and automation increase efficiency.

[DLIT] (8) 35 :
29) Create an artifact to solve a problem using ideation and iteration in the problem-solving process.

Examples: Create a public service announcement or design a computer program, game, or application.

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computational Thinking
URL: https://www.remc.org/21Things4Students/21/21-computational-thinking/
Description:

Have you ever had a complex problem that you needed to solve? This could be a math problem, science experiment, an essay you need to write, and coding and game design. It could even be as simple as planning the best route to school or baking your favorite cookies!

Computational thinking can be used to take a complex problem, understand what the problem is and develop possible solutions to solve or explain it.

Students will complete Quests to learn about the four stages of computational thinking:


LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

When you have completed this activity you will:

  1. understand computational thinking [Computational Thinker]
     
  2. be able to solve complex problems using computational thinking. [Computational Thinker]

  3. be able to break down a problem into smaller more manageable parts. [Computational Thinker]

  4. know how to look for patterns and sequences. [Computational Thinker]

  5. be able to focus on important information only. [Computational Thinker]

  6. be able to develop a step-by-step solution to the problem. [Computational Thinker]

  7. know how to use coding to automate a task [Computational Thinker]

  8. understand computational design by applying technology to a problem [Innovative Designer]

  9. understand programming as you complete hands-on activities, solving problems encountered [Computational Thinker]

  10. understand the coding your program creates [Empowered Learner]



   View Standards     Standard(s): [DLIT] (6) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (6) 8 :
2) Define a process as a function.

Example: Functions or sets of steps combined to produce a process: turning off your alarm + getting out of bed + brushing your teeth + getting dressed = morning routine.

[DLIT] (6) 12 :
6) Identify steps in developing solutions to complex problems using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (7) 5 :
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

[DLIT] (7) 11 :
5) Solve a complex problem using computational thinking.

[DLIT] (8) 6 :
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

[DLIT] (8) 8 :
2) Explain how abstraction is used in a given function.

Example: Examine a set of block-based code and explain how abstraction was used.

[DLIT] (8) 9 :
3) Create an algorithm using a programming language that includes the use of sequencing, selections, or iterations.

Example: Use a block-based or script programming language
Step 1: Start
Step 2: Declare variables a, b and c.
Step 3: Read variables a, b and c.
Step 4: If a>b
      If a>c
         Display a is the largest number.
     Else
         Display c is the largest number.
   Else
      If b>c
         Display b is the largest number.
      Else
         Display c is the greatest number.
Step 5: Stop

Subject: Digital Literacy and Computer Science (6 - 8)
Title: Computer Science Discoveries Unit 3 Chapter 1 Lesson 4: Shapes and Randomization (18-19)
URL: https://studio.code.org/s/csd3-2018/stage/4/puzzle/1
Description:

This lesson extends the drawing skills to include width and height and introduces the concept of random number generation. The class learns to draw with versions of the ellipse() and rect() that include width and height parameters and to use the background() block to fill the screen with color. At the end of the progression, the class is introduced to the randomNumber() block and uses the new blocks to draw a randomized rainbow snake.

Note: You will need to create a free account on code.org before you can view this resource.



ALEX Classroom Resources: 2

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